close

climate change

Non profit living

BN Indians: Young community servants show the future is in good hands

Aditi Sharma founded the Inclusive Education Coalition (IEC) when she was a senior at Normal Community High School. She is now a student at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana.

She said the history curriculum particularly caught her attention when she realized the peaceful side of the civil rights movement dominated the narrative.

“You don’t get the real truth that this movement wasn’t always just a peaceful movement,” Sharma said. “That a lot of the change that’s been brought about, has been brought about in a way that people don’t really like to hear.”

She also noticed that the health curriculum was exclusive to LGBTQ+ people and abstinence-based, and that the English class readings were mostly written by white men.

“I believe education is the first step to fostering empathy,” Sharma said. “So that’s what pushed me to create this group.”

Bloomington’s More is a senior at Normal Community High School. She also advocates for inclusion as co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School group. She also started the volunteer youth group Little Free Pantry. More said she heard about a similar pantry in Arkansas and started her own when she learned about 100 kids in McLean Country go to bed hungry every night.

“And it struck a chord with me,” More said. “I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.

More said because of her privilege, she assumed hunger was not an issue in McLean County.

“I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.”

Raji More, Normal Community High School student

“So to hear that they were concerned about that, and that it was a huge priority for them to get food for a day, was interesting to me and concerning to me,” More said.

Dhruv Rebba is also a senior at Normal Community High School. As WGLT reported in October, he won the National 4-H Council’s 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for creating several projects. that advance technological learning opportunities for children and the quality of life opportunities for citizens in crisis. This includes founding the nonprofit Universal Help, which digitized and provided textbooks, internet access and technology to schools in rural India.

Rebba also set up a robotics club at Grove Elementary School to increase STEM-based learning opportunities for young children. He told WGLT student reporter Jordan Mead that robotics can be expensive and the club is making it more accessible to younger students. “And a lot of the students I’ve taught are now on robotics teams competitively, and that’s pretty cool to see,” Rebba said.

Bloomington’s Isha Gollapudi is a sophomore at Normal Community. She is a firm believer in community service, with art as her favorite tool.

“Art is a universal language,” Gollapudi explained. “I may not be able to understand what everyone has to say, but when you see a job you understand the message behind it. And it’s extremely impactful.

Like More, Gollapudi is part of the Little Free Pantry, even ruling it for a year. Through the Bloomington-Normal Art Circle, she also participates in “Chairs 4 Change,” where community members paint chairs and other furniture to be auctioned off by Recycling Furniture for Families.

“Just having art around you really brightens people’s moods,” Gollapudi said. “So I like to paint more upbeat or happier things, especially when they go to places like charities. Because I think it’s going to brighten up the mood around everyone there.

Gollapudi is so committed to the power of art that she gave it a 10-minute run on the TED-X Normal stage last year.

“So even though I only look like I’m 14,” she said towards the end of her speech, “the journey that art has taken me and the knowledge that I acquired thanks to him, almost make me feel like I’m 743 years old. Thank you.”

Inspiration struck in sixth grade. His works were part of student selections chosen by local artist Julie Meulemans to be exhibited at her Normal gallery downtown. One piece sold for $20.

“And at the time, it was huge,” recalls Gollapudi. “I was like, ‘I can make money from this.’ Then I realized that I could help people with that too.That kind of started for me.

Sparkling plea

Aditi Sharma said the anti-immigration rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election was the initial fuel that sparked her advocacy for inclusion. But she added that her parents initially pushed for a low profile because they and she were immigrants.

“So maybe I should keep quiet, shut up, not make trouble, just do what my parents came here to do.” It was to help me get a better education and a better job,” Sharma said.

It didn’t last long.

“But I couldn’t sit while I watched all these things happen to people in my community and people in other communities,” said Sharma, who became a US citizen at 14.

Sharma made a point of thanking her parents for instilling in her the generosity and empathy towards the struggles of others that have become her core values. “Because we as immigrants moved here and we struggled a lot,” she said.

Sharma said unlike many South Asians who come to Bloomington-Normal for work, her family has no built-in class privilege. And seeing his parents struggle at first was an eye opener.

“I recognize that this is something that so many families in America go through. And so that has a lot to do with my desire to want to make this change,” Sharma said.

Dhruv Rebba said the founding of Universal Help was at least partly spurred by visiting the rural area where his father grew up in India.

“That’s when I was like, ‘OK, that’s a really big difference in living standards, and basic luxuries just aren’t available there. For example, reliable digital access for school supplies and things like that,” Rebba said.

His non-profit organization is helping to digitize these rural schools with computers, projectors, a digital curriculum, and “uninterruptible power supply to meet electricity needs. Because there are power cuts quite often in this part of India,” Rebba said.

He has also contributed to natural disaster relief in West Bengal after Cyclone Yaas of 2021, running a COVID-19 isolation center to combat the Delta Variant in India, and through grassroots projects such as recycling and composting in McLean County.

“Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people around the world in innovative ways,” said Rebba.

In addition to founding and directing the Little Free Pantry in Bloomington-Normal, Raji More is co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School Group and sits on the city’s Not in our School Steering Committee. Others said they were planning protests and vigils and fighting for inclusivity and equality.

Like Sharma, More credits her parents for being willing to serve Bloomington-Normal, teaching her to be kind to everyone and treat everyone the same.

“Part of that meant that I saw that some people weren’t able to have similar opportunities, and those opportunities included getting food. And I was like, ‘Let’s make sure they have access to food too,'” More said.

Plus was also moved to act as a witness for the division. Between people, between ideas. She touts the restorative circles she uses in Not in our School, where people can express ideas without being combative. And she strives to minimize the labeling of people.

“That’s part of why I do my projects…to really include people. Some people aren’t included and don’t have the same opportunities as me, and I strive to include people,” More said.

“Rooted in Who You Are”

Isha Gollapudi thinks his desire to serve is at least partly cultural, citing the Indian holiday Holi, a festival of colors, and Diwali – the five-day festival of lights.

“When you’re brought up with the idea that all these big parties are about giving back to others, it’s kind of ingrained in who you are,” Gollapudi said.

She said it was no different from Christmas in some ways.

“Because it’s fun to get presents, but seeing your brother’s face when he opens a present you gave him…I think it’s so much better,” Gollapudi said.

Gollapudi adds that she has equated community service with a way of life that will continue into adulthood, with climate change now on her service radar.

Dhruv Rebba said that not only would he serve until adulthood, but he was just beginning.

“Many of the projects we have started locally and in India are relatively long-term projects. So I will definitely keep doing this for a long time,” Rebba said.

Like many youngsters, Aditi Sharma is under some parental pressure to pursue a lucrative career. But she said her passion for social justice and activism comes first.

“Whatever I end up doing after my four years of undergrad, I know I’m always going to want to be part of any community, no matter where I live. This service is at the core of my being,” Sharma said.

Raji More said she loves Bloomington-Normal so much that she hopes to attend college in town, continue her community service and advocate for inclusivity. She cites Camille Taylor and Mary Aplington of Not in our Town as mentors.

“So many community members, I’m so grateful to be in their presence,” More said. “So it’s mostly the people of Bloomington-Normal that keep me wanting to be here.”

ABOUT THE SERIES

Why we did it

Bloomington-Normal has more East Indians than any other southern Illinois metropolitan community. First-generation Indian immigrants and their children shaped Bloomington-Normal in more or less significant ways, and it deserves our attention. The WGLT Newsroom aimed to measure this impact in an 8-part series of human-centered stories.

how we did it

The Bloomington-Normal Indian community is not a monolith – socio-economically, politically, culturally – and this series aims to reflect that. The WGLT newsroom interviewed over 30 people from a variety of backgrounds. We recognize that these sources do not represent all Indians in Bloomington-Normal. They represent themselves and we appreciate their willingness to share their story.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of the series and what future features we should consider. You can message our newsroom at WGLT.org/Contact.

read more
History organization

Science education teacher named Fellow of Linnean Society of London



Photo submitted

Professor William McComas stands next to the statue of Charles Darwin, a member of the Linnean Society, at the Natural History Museum in London.

William F. McComas, Emeritus Parks Family Professor of Science Education at the College of Education and Health Professions, was elected a Fellow at the 2021 Autumn Meeting of the Linnean Society of London. He joins a host of other scientists and scholars who have been members and fellows over the organization’s more than 230-year history.

The Linnean Society, the world’s oldest active biological society, was founded in 1788 and named for Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus, who established the system used to name and classify the biological world. The Linnaean system allows scientists “to identify baselines and track the impact of human activity on the environment around us, including the food supply, as we face the combined challenges of biodiversity loss and climate change,” according to the website.

Membership in the organization is open to professional scientists and amateurs who share an interest in natural history. “The Fellowship is international and includes world leaders in every branch of biology who use the Society’s facilities and publications to communicate new advances in their fields,” McComas said. Many notable scientists have been members, including Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, the co-discoverers of natural selection, a key mechanism of evolution.

McComas was recommended as a Fellow because of his work in evolutionary education, Darwin studies and his writing of The American biology professorthe journal of the National Association of Biology Teachers.

The Linnean Society is headquartered in New Burlington House, a neo-Palladian mansion in the Mayfair district of London. It shares the building with four other learned societies, the Geological Society, the Royal Astronomical Society, the Society of Antiquaries and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Since 1829, the society has safeguarded Linnaeus’s personal books, as well as his collection of flora and fauna. Additionally, it maintains an extensive library focusing on natural history, biodiversity, environment, conservation, and related topics. The society supports grassroots scholarship, public education, and informed policymaking.

read more
International headquarters

Entain launches the Global Innovation Hub, Ennovate

Ennovate supports Entain’s ambition to be a global leader in interactive entertainment, delivering great products and moments of excitement for customers. As media, entertainment and games converge, customers expect richer experiences, with greater variety of content, immersive experiences, personalization and social interaction that increase their enjoyment and engagement.

Early technology companies to work with Ennovate include Verizon, BT and Theta Labs, all of which seek to develop groundbreaking customer experiences in gaming and interactive entertainment. Non-profit organizations are also collaborating with Ennovate, using technology for innovations that bring societal and environmental benefits. All external partners will collaborate with Entain’s own technical team and use the Ennovate hub to design, develop, experiment and bring their innovations to life.

“We want to lead the way with exciting new products and experiences for customers and use our cutting-edge technology to innovate sports, games and interactive entertainment for the metaverse,” said Jette Nygaard-Andersenmanaging director of Entain.

“We also want to use our position as a global technology leader to drive innovation on a larger scale. Working with partners around the world, Ennovate will demonstrate how Entain’s cutting-edge technology can both revolutionize consumer experiences and deliver real benefits to society,” she added.

Ennovate’s first dedicated innovation lab will be located in Charterhouse Square, Farringdon, in the heart of London entrepreneurial tech community, close to the UK headquarters of TikTok and Snapchat. It will host members of Entain’s innovation technology team, working alongside its business and nonprofit partners.

Inaugurated this spring, the place is equipped with state-of-the-art technology, in order to create a unique environment in which to build and experience new entertainment experiences. These will include the development of new entertainment products for the Metaverse, a virtual reality space where people can interact in a computer-generated environment.

The centerpiece of this and future Ennovate Labs will be an Experience Zone, allowing customers, investors, partners and employees to try out new, immersive experiences in sports, games and interactive entertainment.

“Our goal is to bring to life the most exciting experiences in immersive sports, gaming and interactive entertainment as the metaverse takes shape,” said Sandep Tiku, chief operating officer at Entain, which leads its work on disruptive innovation. “By working with partners, we believe we can achieve great things faster, both for customers and to apply these technologies and skills to benefit society at large.”

Ennovate will initially present:

New consumer products and experiences to drive immersive entertainment

  • Non-fungible tokens (NFT), or unique digital collectible assets, that Entain develops for the Group’s brands. Partypoker today announces plans to launch its first official Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) soon, powered by Theta Labs. NFTs are unique, non-fungible certificates of authenticity of digital files, which may include items such as artwork, music, video, or tweets. Partypoker NFTs will feature some of the most iconic video moments and tournament hands in partypoker and partypoker LIVE history.
  • Immersive experiences in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) will also be presented and developed at the Ennovate Hub. These will include a pioneering multi-sport club experience in virtual reality, which the Group will launch shortly.
  • VR arcades. Entain will make immersive experiences available to customers on the high street, converting two locations into new VR retail experience zones where consumers will soon be able to try ground-breaking new experiences in immersive sports and interactive entertainment for themselves- same. Entain is working on innovations for VR in retail and plans to open its first VR arcades later this year.

Technology partnerships

Entain builds relationships and partnerships with technology innovators and companies, based in the UK and around the world, through the Ennovate hub. Initial technology partners include:

  • Verizon, one of the world’s leading digital communications providers, is one of the first major technology companies to work with Entain to build the Ennovate 5G Lab and explore the power of 5G to deliver immersive customer experiences in the field of sports and entertainment. Additionally, the two companies are collaborating to deliver more immersive and connected gaming experiences in international markets, including the United States.
  • LV will partner with Ennovate Hub to explore new immersive products and experiences. As one of the UK’s largest investors in technology R&D, BT will work with Ennovate to bring the power of its cutting-edge 5G connectivity, high-speed fixed networks and explore the use of edge computing to provide bespoke services and disruptive experiences to Entain customers in the UK, delivering immersive experiences in sports, games and interactive entertainment.
  • Theta Laboratories, which provides end-to-end infrastructure for decentralized video and powers NFT and metaverse platforms, is working with Entain to launch a white label NFT platform for partypoker customers. Entain technologists will work further with Theta Labs to use its technology in video streaming, metaverse, gaming and more.

Accelerator and incubator programs

  • The Ennovate Hub will host accelerator and incubator programs, combining disruptive innovative ideas, technology and startup entrepreneurship with Entain’s unparalleled experience serving millions of customers worldwide.
  • The accelerator will initially invest up to £5 million in individual initiatives to develop and boost innovative concepts to revolutionize interactive entertainment, as well as new technologies that deliver societal benefits in line with Entain’s sustainability agenda.
  • Ennovate is already inviting startups focused on immersive customer experiences, interactive entertainment, and the metaverse to be part of this accelerator program, which will officially launch this summer.
  • The first Ennovate laboratory will open in Farringdon, London in spring. It will house on-site experimentation work involving approximately 50 full-time Entain developers and software engineers working on disruptive technologies around the world.

Non-profit and ESG partnerships

Entain wants the advanced technology and innovations being developed at the Ennovate hub to deliver environmental and societal benefits. Nonprofit partners will have access to Ennovate’s technology expertise and workspace, as well as additional support and funding through Ennovate. Initial partnerships include:

  • chance for childhoodan award-winning charity that supports vulnerable children through Africawill work with technologists from the Ennovate hub on an innovative mobile app that digitizes and leverages Chance for Childhood’s breakthrough approach to detecting hidden disabilities and developmental delays in preschoolers Africa. Entain’s technology, using artificial intelligence, will promote personalized and play-based learning for children with disabilities and special educational needs (SEN), which will go a long way towards improving their lives and their learning prospects.
  • Climate Hack.AI Also through Ennovate, as joint lead sponsor with Newcross Healthcare, Entain will fund and support Climate Hack.AI, an international competition that features some of the brightest students from 25 of the world’s top universities such as University College London , Stanford, Harvard, MIT, Oxford and Cambridge – seeking to use artificial intelligence to help fight climate change. The first competition is now underway and focuses on designing algorithms using satellite imagery of the Earth to predict the movement of weather fronts over the UK – an important step in the pipeline to predict weather production. solar energy and, subsequently, to reduce the amount of backup power needed to be produced by carbon-based generators.

Through train, the Group’s global D&I technology initiative, the Group will also explore new opportunities for collaboration within the Ennovate hub to improve the representation of women in STEM industries. Existing partners include Girls Who Code, a nonprofit Entain supports to attract more young women to the tech industry, and the Tech Girls Movement Foundation, which challenges perceptions of gender that limit women’s participation. girls in STEM.

Through its non-profit Foundation, the Group also works with The Berlin University of Technology and the Nexus Institute develop international training for executives to strengthen diversity in research and development and University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV)to support internships for graduates who will work alongside Entain’s US-based global innovation team at UNLV Harry Reid Research and Technology Park.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1736169/Entain_Ennovate_Experience_Zone.jpg

SOURCEEntain

read more
International headquarters

UPSC CSE Key – January 17, 2022: What you need to read today

COVER PAGE

Collarwali breathes his last, MP’s Pench Tiger Reserve loses ‘Supermom’

Program:

Preliminary examination: General questions on environmental ecology, biodiversity and climate change

Main examination: General Studies III: Environmental Conservation, Pollution and Degradation, Environmental Impact Assessment.

Key points to ponder:

• Pench Tiger Reserve and Pench National Park (Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra)

• Cartographic work – Pench River and Kanhan River – Origin

• Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book and Pench National Park – Connect the Dots

• Collarwali (Tigress) – Why was she so famous?

• Map Work-Tiger reserves in India

• Tiger Conservation Program (Project Tiger) – About, Mission and Vision

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 The Story of Collarwali – The “Empress Pench National Park”

📍 Supermom: What makes Collarwali Baghin of Pench Tiger Reserve a tigress like no other

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Devas investors cite Canadian court order, want AI assets seized in US

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance

Main examination: General Studies II: Effect of Policies and Policies of Developed and Developing Countries on India’s Interests

Key points to ponder:

• Mandate and Headquarters of the International Air Transport Association

• Convention on International Civil Aviation, as well as the Chicago Convention and India

• Antrix-Devas Agreement Controversy – Background (2005 agreement, 2011 UPA government canceled agreement, legal disputes, etc.)

• Why are Airports Authority of India (AAI) and Air India targeted?

• Decision of the National Court of Company Law on Devas Multimedia

• Know the National Court of Company Law, Antrix, restrictive immunity

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Explained: Why NCLAT Called the Devas-Antrix Deal a Fraud

📍 The story of a Rs 4,400 crore fiasco at ISRO

Stop unilateral road construction, Nepal tells India

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance

Main examination: General Studies II: India and its neighborhood relations.

Key points to ponder:

• India-Nepal Bilateral Relations

• Border disputes between India and Nepal (Kalapani and Susta region)

• Map Work-Limpiadhura, Lipulekh and Kalapani, Kali River, Dharchula

• Measures taken to resolve the border dispute

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Interpretation of the Indo-Nepal border dispute

📍 Mapping the history of the Kalapani dispute between India and Nepal

📍 Border dispute between India and Nepal at Kalapani: an explanation

THE EDITORIAL PAGE

In Crypto Garb

Program:

Preliminary examination: Economic and social development

Main examination: General Studies-III: Indian Economy and Awareness of IT Fields

Key points to ponder:

• What is crypto investing?

• Can crypto then be considered an asset?

• Cryptocurrency or virtual currency – what do you mean by this term?

• What is Bitcoin?

• What is Blockchain technology and why is it associated with Bitcoin?

• The Cryptocurrency and Official Digital Currency Regulation Bill, 2021-Highlights

• Supreme Court on Cryptocurrency in 2018

• What is RBI Sandbox?

• What are the problems with cryptocurrency in traditional financial markets or simply in the market?

• Initial Coin Offering (ICO)

• Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) – Meaning, Issues and Challenges

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Explanation: digital currencies and how they work

📍 Explanation: how are cryptocurrencies regulated in countries around the world?

📍 The Myth and Lure of Crypto

IDEAS PAGE

An Indian Green Accord
Program:

Preliminary examination: General questions on environmental ecology, biodiversity and climate change

Main examination: General Studies III: Environmental Conservation, Pollution and Degradation, Environmental Impact Assessment.

Key points to ponder:

• According to the author of this article, what is the Indian Green Deal (IGD)?

• Components of the Indian Green Deal (IGD) and how will this program help?

• What does ‘Net Zero’ mean?

• India’s commitment to carbon neutrality by 2070 at the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP) Climate Summit in
Glasgow or India’s enhanced climate commitments – the “Panchamrit”

• Difference between ‘Net Zero’ and ‘Carbon Neutral’?

• India’s new renewable energy target

• How to reach net zero?

• Public-private partnership frameworks to achieve “net zero”

• Current India Emissions Scenario

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Praveer Sinha: “Net-zero carbon emissions by 2070 is totally doable”

📍 1 billion tons of emissions reduced: why it’s a big step forward

EXPRESS NETWORK

WEF summit starts today; Modi, XI to deliver special addresses

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

Main examination: General Studies II: Important international institutions, agencies and forums – their structure, mandate.

Key points to ponder:

• World Economic Forum – About, Role, Mission, Vision, Mandate, Headquarters

• Initiatives taken by the World Economic Forum

• India and World Economic Forum

• Reports published by the World Economic Forum

In 2021, the incomes of 84% of households fell, but the number of billionaires increased

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

main examination: General Studies I: Poverty and Development Issues

Key points to ponder:

• Oxfam Report, ‘Inequality Kills’ – Key Points

• Get to know Oxfam International

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Covid has widened inequalities: wealth, education, gender

THE WORLD

Russia issues more subtle threats than invading Ukraine

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

Main examination: General Studies II: Effect of Policies and Policies of Developed and Developing Countries on India’s Interests

Key points to ponder:

• What do you mean by “hybrid warfare”?

• Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) – About, Member Countries, Mandate and Headquarters

• Where is Ukraine-locate on the map

• United States-Russia and Ukraine crisis

• Request/Proposals from Russia – Main Highlights

• 2014 Crimean crisis

• Crimea’s strategic location – why is it important for Russia?

• Ukraine, NATO, USA and Russia – where are we?

• Article 5 of the founding treaty of NATO (Collective security)

• India’s position in the Ukrainian crisis

• Bilateral relations between India and Ukraine

• How can India help the United States and Russia keep the “peace” in this conflict?

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)

📍 Ukraine crisis: Risks remain as Russia and the West talk

📍 Ukraine accuses Russia of being behind cyberattack in ‘hybrid warfare’

📍 Hybrid War – New Threats, Complexity, and “Trust” as an Antidote

📍 On the edge of the abyss

ECONOMY

Why the road ahead could be bumpy for India’s early harvest deal with the UK

Program:

Preliminary examination: Economic and social development

Main examination: General Studies II: General Studies II: Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements involving India and/or affecting India’s interests

Key points to ponder:

• What is the Early Harvest Agreement?

• What is a Free Trade Agreement (FTA)?

• Know other types of trade agreements such as bilateral investment treaty (BIT), preferential trade zone, single market, customs union, etc.

• What is the definition of trade given by the WTO?

• Reinforced commercial partnership between India and the United Kingdom

• Trade between India and the UK

• Importance of trade relations between India and UK

• India and Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Unlocking a new era: India-UK trade deal

📍 Explained: why India is trying to strike a free trade agreement with the UK

Get an e-paper subscription via our special offer – click here

For any questions or comments, contact [email protected]

read more
Canadian army

Prepare for America’s right-wing dictatorship before 2030, urges Canadian scholar


A Canadian political scientist urged his country’s government to prepare for the possibility of the United States becoming a right-wing dictatorship before 2030.

In an editorial published in The Globe and Mail Thomas Homer-Dixon, executive director of the Cascade Institute at Royal Roads University in British Columbia, on Friday warned his country had to prepare for the worst-case scenario.

“By 2025, America’s democracy could crumble, causing extreme domestic political instability, including widespread civil violence,” Homer-Dixon wrote.

“By 2030, if not sooner, the country could be ruled by a right-wing dictatorship. We should not rule out these possibilities just because they seem ridiculous or too horrible to imagine.

“In 2014, the suggestion that Donald Trump would become president would have struck almost everyone as absurd as well. But today we live in a world where the absurd regularly becomes real and the ugly banality.”

The scholar added: “The [U.S.] is becoming more and more ungovernable, and some experts believe it could escalate into civil war. “

Three retired U.S. military generals last month warned of the possibility of civil war if the 2024 presidential election results are not accepted by sections of the military.

In November, more than 150 U.S. academics wrote a public letter supporting the Freedom to Vote Act, which deals with voter registration and access, and has yet to be passed. These researchers warned that “democracy advocates in America still have a slim window of opportunity to act. But time is running out and midnight is approaching. “

In the editorial, Homer-Dixon detailed the reasons for what he called the “ongoing crisis” in the United States, writing that there had been multiple “warning signs” and the reasons for a changing political landscape.

Among them, he cited “stagnant middle-class incomes, chronic economic insecurity and growing inequality,” and a broadcaster such as the late Rush Limbaugh who he said had “hammered” the “moral authority of political institutions. American “.

He also pointed to “right-wing ideologues” stoking fears of a white “replacement”, the refusal of the rich and powerful “to pay taxes, invest in public services or create opportunities for vertical mobility” .

The editorial made reference to former President Trump, his administration and “Trumpism” 28 times.

At one point, Homer-Dixon wrote that “if Mr. Trump is re-elected, even under the most optimistic scenarios, the economic and political risks to our country will be innumerable. “

News week has contacted Trump’s rep for comment.

Discussing the “big lie” – Trump’s false claim that the 2020 presidential election was stolen – Homer-Dixon said that if Trump were re-elected in 2024, the GOP leader would have “only two goals: justification and revenge “.

“A terrible storm is coming from the south and Canada is absolutely unprepared,” wrote the political scientist.

“Over the past year, we have turned our attention inward, distracted by the challenges of COVID-19, reconciliation and the accelerated effects of climate change. democracy in the United States.

“We must begin by fully recognizing the extent of the danger.”

Homer-Dixon advised the Canadian government to create a permanent, non-partisan parliamentary committee to “receive information on the state of democracy in the United States and make recommendations.”

The American flag flies in front of the dome of the United States Capitol on September 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. A Canadian political scientist has warned that his country should prepare for the possibility of an American dictatorship by 2030.
Drew Angerer / Getty Images


read more
History organization

Colorado disaster declared after “Apocalypse-like” fire


Video

transcription

transcription

No deaths reported in Colorado wildfires

Thursday’s rapid fire burned more than 6,000 acres and forced thousands of residents to evacuate.

“During the night, the firefighters continued their mitigation efforts. Good news, we still have no reports of casualties or deaths. The only missing person we had last night has been found and is fine. So that’s great news and actually, I think, given the events we had yesterday, quite miraculous. We know that power lines fell in the area where the fire started. The origin of the fire has not been confirmed. It is suspected that these are power lines. But we’re investigating this today, and we have people on the ground as we speak who are trying to identify that cause. “It touched close to home for many of us, literally in some cases, for those of us who live nearby. But also in terms of the fire that was not a forest fire in the forest, it was a suburban and urban fire. The Costco, where we all do our shopping, the target where we buy our children’s clothes, all surrounded, damaged. Nearly 1,000 homes in two beautiful, close-knit, close-knit communities in our state are gone. “

Thursday’s rapid fire burned more than 6,000 acres and forced thousands of residents to evacuate.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff / The New York Times

BOULDER, Colo .– A windswept wildfire that ravaged suburban neighborhoods between Denver and Boulder on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of thousands, may have destroyed between 500 and 1,000 homes, authorities said Friday morning , making it the most destructive outbreak in the history of the state.

The blaze, as intense as it was sudden, prompted tens of thousands of Boulder County residents to leave department stores and homes Thursday as fire trucks swarmed the area. Although forest fires were considered less threatening in suburban areas, particularly in December, a period of intense drought had created the conditions for the flames to spread, destroying homes, a shopping complex and a hotel.

“It looked like the apocalypse,” said Ruthie Werner, a resident of Louisville, Colorado, who had gone shopping at a Target store but arrived to find the parking lot on fire.

Gov. Jared Polis told a news conference that President Biden approved an Expedited Major Disaster Declaration, which allows those who have lost their homes or small businesses to get help before the preliminary damage assessment is carried out. He said schools and major hospitals in the area have been spared.

As Mr Polis toured the damage by helicopter on Friday, a video posted by a local television station showed how the flames struck seemingly at random. A house on a cul-de-sac would be destroyed, while the others appeared to be intact. In one neighborhood, a row of about 10 still smoking piles of rubble adjoined other houses that appeared to have escaped serious damage.

Despite the destruction, no deaths have been recorded, a figure Mr Polis said at the press conference would be a ‘New Year’s miracle’ if held up.

“It wasn’t a wildfire in the forest, it was a suburban, urban fire,” said Mr. Polis, a Democrat who lives in Boulder County. “The Costco where we all buy, the target where we buy our children’s clothes – all damaged.”

Video
Loading the video player
A period of intense drought created the conditions for the flames to spread to areas between Denver and Boulder on Thursday, destroying homes, a shopping complex and a hotel.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff / The New York Times

The blaze, which started late Thursday morning, burned in a “mosaic” fashion, encouraged by winds of 105 miles per hour. It burned down about 6,000 acres, said Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle, who added damage assessments were still ongoing on Friday. Authorities suspect the blaze was caused by a failed power line, but this has not been confirmed, he said.

Much of the fire has been contained, only a few parts of Boulder County still nunnery, he said. Heavy snowfall was forecast for Friday, which would help contain the blaze but could also cause pipes to freeze, officials said.

Louisville and Superior, both located about nine miles east of Boulder, suffered the most “catastrophic” losses, he said. Residents of those towns were ordered to evacuate on Thursday, as were residents of the nearby towns of Broomfield and Westminster.

Although there has not been an immediate official tally of the number of people ultimately displaced, around 200 people are currently being accommodated in emergency shelters in the county, Polis said.

Evacuees fled areas of fire under plumes of smoke that darkened the sky for miles on Thursday, unsure whether their homes would stay overnight. The roads and highways in the Denver metro area were congested with thousands of residents trying to flee.

“It took us almost an hour to get out of our neighborhood – it was full traffic jam,” said John Stein, who was walking his dog in Superior when he saw smoke in the neighborhood and heard sirens.

Thomas Maxwell, 25, said he was unsure on Thursday whether his parents’ house in Louisville was still standing. Mr. Maxwell, who lives in California, had kept a dog for them while on vacation in Spain. He woke them up with a midnight call to tell them that he had evacuated to a hotel with their two dogs.

“It was crazy how quickly it happened,” said Maxwell. “I read about forest fires in California all the time. Now I am living it. It is so different.

Wildfires in the American West have worsened – bigger and bigger, spreading faster, and reaching mountainous elevations that were once too wet and cool to withstand heavy fires. What was once a seasonal phenomenon has become a threat year-round, with fires burning later in the fall and winter.

Recent research has suggested that the heat and drought associated with global warming are the main reasons for the increase in larger and more powerful fires, as precipitation regimes have been disrupted, snow melts earlier, and grasslands and grasslands. forests are burnt in kindling.

Colorado experienced the three largest wildfires in its history in the summer of 2020, each burning more than 200,000 acres, Polis said. But those fires burned forests and federally owned land, he said, while Thursday’s fires destroyed suburban developments and shopping malls.

“As a millennial, I just look outside and see climate change,” said Angelica Kalika, 36, of Broomfield. “I see my future. I grew up in Colorado, and it’s a place where I had snowy Christmases and a beautiful 60 degree summer. But, for me, it’s a moment of deep awareness of climate change when there is a forest fire outside my door. “


read more
Canadian army

November 27: Chapman has the right to reward vaccinated workers, Dundas in smoke and other letters


Chalk crime

Regarding the article entitled “Men guilty of hate crimes in synagogue avoid prison” (November 15): it went without comment that this case is probably the first time in Canada that the crime of mischief has been committed by drawing in the chalk.

I would have no doubts about the fairness of the prosecution of these young men if the hate messages had been painted in the synagogue parking lot. The paint would have been difficult and expensive to remove. The chalk can be removed with a few sweeps of the broom or, if left unchecked, it would be washed away in the next rain. A chalk drawing on a parking lot, whether it is a written message, a symbol or a hopscotch, does not interfere with the normal use of the property.

Whether the marked, written or drawn thing is offensive is not part of the definition of the offense. I have searched in vain for any binding legal authority in which the decision ratio was that marking property with chalk may constitute the crime of mischief within the meaning of s. 430 of the Criminal Code. If a lawyer or a police officer directly involved in this lawsuit can provide me with the report of such a case, I will gladly offer him lunch.

Andrew Bell, Stoney Creek

Non-essential hospitals?

While it might seem silly at first glance, making hospitals a non-essential service would mean that to enter you will need to have your COVID passport just like you have to show it to eat out or see a movie. Just think of the number of beds that would open up to sick people through no fault of their own. An added benefit may be that it would encourage fence keepers to “get the jab!” “

Paul John Phillips, Dundas

Vaccine rewards

Apparently the unvaccinated do not like the vaccinated to be rewarded! Rather than letting unvaccinated workers go, Chapman Ice Cream decided to give its vaccinated employees a raise of $ 1 per hour, which equates to the $ 40 it has to pay each week for rapid tests. for the unvaccinated. Have they let go of the unvaccinated? No! Did they force them to get vaccinated? No! So why can’t they reward those who have done their community duty to help end this pandemic? I guess it’s because they don’t focus all of their effort and attention on the unvaccinated. Want to be part of the increase? Get vaccinated or don’t complain!

Leorita Staresina, Hamilton

Say no to jets

If we were to buy the 88 fighter jets on offer, Canada would very likely be led by NATO to use them in conflicts that destabilize the poorest countries. Have you noticed that when two powerful countries disagree (for example, the United States, Russia or China), they end up going to war in a poor country to settle the dispute by proxy? And as Mark Hagar pointed out in The Spectator on November 22, it would be the largest military purchase ever made by Canada. The massive purchase far exceeds the tax dollars spent on climate issues, health care, Indigenous rights, affordable housing and other social issues. There should be a full investigation into the merits of these arms purchases.

Canada can certainly use its tax dollars for peaceful ideas such as high-profile talks and strong incentives for aid, as well as climate crisis mitigation and Canada’s own social needs. And if you are worried about the climate crisis, remember that the military’s huge greenhouse gas emissions are contributing to climate change but are not even allowed to be counted (due to US demands to exempt them during the Kyoto summit). As our national anthem sings, “Keep the Guard for You”. Tell your MP Filomena Tassi, the new Federal Minister of Procurement, that you do not support these purchases. We must not allow the powerful military-industrial complex and NATO to ruin our country and the planet.

Up in smoke

If affordable housing were pottery stores, the problem would be solved. In Dundas we have a grocery store but two cannabis retailers. Our priorities go up in smoke.

Robin Magder Pierce, Dundas

Military honors

Canadians are now realizing the ultimate goal that a national army should serve. Its primary focus should not be to blow up towns, kill people, and defeat our enemies, but to help with natural disasters, as British Columbia is finding out. The Canadian Armed Forces should take a well-deserved bow for stepping up so willingly to help the citizens of British Columbia. They have also helped other Canadians recently when the COVID-19 crisis was at its height. Pinning prestigious medals on these soldiers for their efforts would recognize their contribution to Canada.


read more
Canadian army

Wolseley Barracks grounds transformed for Canadian Armed Forces Disaster Preparedness Exercise – London


Londoners near Wolseley Barracks might notice a little more action than usual this weekend, with the 31st Canadian Brigade Group of the Canadian Armed Forces performing realistic disaster scenarios.

The planned training is all the more relevant as the soldiers are training for scenarios similar to the massive flooding in British Columbia at this time.

“It’s ironic that we are here at our headquarters when a similar headquarters has been deployed to help in flood situations. Our service is therefore very relevant insofar as it is a real situation, ”said Lt. Col. Alex Colic.

About 100 local Army Reserve soldiers conduct a simulated emergency scenario-based exercise in Ontario.

The scenario is designed to provide a realistic, simulated response to a request for assistance (PD) from a Canadian community, such as a COVID-19 pandemic, an ice storm, or a natural gas leak.

The story continues under the ad

About 100 local Army Reserve soldiers conduct a simulated emergency scenario-based exercise in Ontario at the Wolseley Barracks. November 20, 2021.


Sawyer Bogdan / Global News


Read more:

Floods in British Columbia – 350 soldiers “ready to deploy” from Edmonton

With climate change making problems like wildfires or flooding more frequent, Colic said it was important for the military to be trained to respond at all times.

“All of this is designed so that when the Canadian government asks for help, we can mobilize successful teams and send them across Canada to support our fellow citizens,” said Colic.

A semi-permanent tent-shaped structure is installed on the grounds of Wolseley Barracks, which can house up to 150 soldiers and serves as a mobile command base. November 20, 2021.


Sawyer Bogdan / Global News


A semi-permanent tent-like structure is installed on the ground of the Wolseley Barracks, which can house up to 150 soldiers and serves as a mobile command base with flooring, heating, lighting and insulation.

The story continues under the ad

Lieutenant (N) Andrew McLaughlin noted that the Canadian Army Reserve has two tasks: one to help missions abroad and the other to help Canadians in need.

“Being there for Canadians when they need us there most there, and that means in crisis situations when Canadian communities go through the process of asking for help and find themselves in need, the CAF are able to intervene. “

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


read more
International headquarters

Secretary Antony J. Blinken at an Ocean Plastics event


MRS ANDERSEN: Thank you. I am very honored to welcome you, Secretary Blinken, to the United Nations in Nairobi. For almost 50 years – next year it will be 50 – we at the United Nations Environment Program have been proud to host in Kenya the only UN Headquarters located in the Global South, the nerve center of multilateral governance here for the environment.

Secretary Blinken, your presence here today is extremely important. Your presence here demonstrates that the United States wants to be part of the multilateral solutions that will keep environmental action moving. At UNEP, we have long enjoyed a strong partnership with the United States on environmental law, pollution reduction, promotion of the green economy, scientific leadership for the environment and , most recently, of course, in Glasgow on methane emissions.

Mr Secretary, we have just concluded the Climate COP in Glasgow, and if there is one clear conclusion, of course, for us and for the world, it is that we can keep 1.5 alive, we can make it happen. , but it’s gonna take us all to make it happen. And as we now rush to the United Nations Environment Assembly in February 2022 to be held here in this beautiful location, we must recognize that the work Member States are doing on plastic pollution has the potential to be a turning point. Meaningful action against pollution will force us out of our comfort zones, by engaging in numerous environmental agreements with business and finance, with cities, with civil society, with entrepreneurs and with people around the world. .

I am therefore very happy to welcome here the presence of the remarkable Kenyan entrepreneurs who are proof that the action is already underway, and our host country, Kenya, continues to focus on the transition to clean energy by 2030. , geothermal energy, wind power, solar home power, the successful ban on single-use plastic bags, green bonds, climate-resilient agriculture, and much more.

So, Mr. Secretary, UNEP will mark its 50th anniversary next year, and as we seek to work together to address a triple planetary crisis – the climate change crisis, the biodiversity crisis and the loss of nature, and the pollution and waste crisis – we have a real opportunity to rush towards environmental multilateralism that has an impact, a positive impact, on people’s lives. Because as the UN Secretary General has noted, success or failure is not an act of nature; it’s in our hands. Thank you, Mr. Secretary.

SECRETARY BLINKEN: Well, hello everyone, and Executive Director Andersen, thank you very much for your outstanding leadership on this issue, for the work of the entire United Nations Environment Program team within the only United Nations Headquarters in the United Nations. southern country, and what seat it is.

Inger and I were just in Glasgow for COP26, and UNEP was a key partner in rallying countries to take the bold and urgent action needed to keep warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius and avert climate catastrophe. To give just one example, the independent and rigorous data tracked by the UNEP International Methane Emissions Observatory will bring greater transparency to the efforts of more than 100 countries now, led by the European Union and the United States. who signed the Global Methane Pledge. This commitment commits to reducing global methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030. This is just one important example of action taken by the international community in Glasgow.

Many countries, including in Africa, have established more ambitious national action plans to reduce emissions, and many have made significant commitments to invest more in adaptation, especially in vulnerable countries through initiatives such as the Africa Adaptation Initiative and President Biden’s Emergency Plan for Adaptation and Resilience, or PREPARE, as the acronym says.

Now back to methane, if the world’s major emitters of methane join us, including China, that would be like taking every ship out of the seas and every plane out of the skies in terms of emissions. At the same time, we still have a lot of work to do. As Inger pointed out at COP26, we must now stick to the commitments we made, and we must continue to push for greater commitments and more action on adaptation and mitigation, because no one is under the illusion that we have done enough yet, especially as the damage inflicted by the climate crisis continues to worsen, as the brutal drought here in Kenya very clearly shows.

So today we are stepping up and intensifying our efforts to tackle another pollutant that threatens our planet, plastic, by announcing US support for multilateral negotiations on a global deal to tackle plastic pollution in the oceans. By launching these negotiations at the United Nations Environmental Assembly in February 2022, our goal is to create a tool we can use to protect our oceans and all the life they support from the growing global harms of plastic pollution.

It is crucial that the agreement calls on countries to develop and implement strong national action plans to tackle this problem at its source. Many countries, climate and ocean advocates, private companies have supported this effort for some time. We are grateful for the serious work they have already put into this effort and look forward to working with them. The private sector in particular will need to do more to reduce plastic pollution and invest in innovation. We recognize that different actors will have different capacities to act, but every nation, every community, and indeed every individual has a role to play, and let me say a little about why.

It is estimated that we add between eight and fourteen million tonnes of plastic pollution to the ocean each year. That’s about one truckload dumped into the sea every minute of every day, and the rate is increasing rather than decreasing. Plastic can take decades to millions of years to break down. Meanwhile, the waste is transported everywhere from Antarctica to the Mariana Trench. Some of it is caught in massive swirling ocean currents. The largest, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, covers an area three times the size of France.

The negative effects of plastic pollution on marine life and humans are serious. Much of the plastic at sea is broken down into tiny pieces that marine animals eat. These microplastics can tear animals’ organs, clog their intestines, and make them look full, causing them to starve to death. And because plastics absorb toxins, when we eat seafood, we are not only consuming microplastics, but toxins as well. In addition, plastic pollution can harm artisanal fishing and discourage tourism in coastal areas.

As we know, our health, our survival is linked to the health of our oceans. We must do more to protect them. Supporting the development of this new deal is just one of the ways we are working to make it happen, but it comes above many others. At the 2019 Our Ocean conference, the United States announced more than 20 new commitments valued at over $ 1.2 billion to promote sustainable fishing, tackle marine debris and invest in marine science. In February, the United States will co-host the next Our Ocean conference with Palau, where we will focus on the link between oceans and climate change and the importance of healthy oceans for the survival of small island developing states. .

This connection is at the heart of the SALPIE initiative that President Biden launched in March to increase U.S. economic cooperation with island countries and territories. This overall goal has strong bipartisan support from the United States Congress, which passed the landmark 2020 Save Our Seas 2.0 legislation. As this legislation recognizes, innovation is crucial, and on this point the United States leads by force of our example, like the Plastics Innovation Challenge of the United States Department of Energy, which invests millions of dollars. dollars of research in national laboratories, universities, and industry to take giant leaps in areas such as the development of new recyclable plastics by design.

Many of the most promising innovations do not come from government or industry, but from individuals, including as we have just seen here in Kenya. Indeed, before speaking to you, I had the chance to meet a duo of very inspiring entrepreneurs. One of them was Nzambi Matee, an engineer who, as some of you may have heard, started a business that turns plastic waste into sustainable, affordable bricks that can be used to pave roads. Her company produces between 500 and a thousand bricks every day, recycling 500 kilos of plastic waste using machines she designed here in Nairobi. The company has created more than a hundred jobs.

The other day the (inaudible) co-founder of a social enterprise that employs women and young people in Mombasa to model a new form of waste management, organized informal workers, trained them to sort recyclable waste of other waste, and put that waste to productive and profitable use.

So we face the monumental challenge of protecting our oceans, but if we are ambitious in our global and local efforts, if we can combine the efforts of government and industry with those of communities and individuals, if we empower approaches innovations which we have seen with partners like Nzambi and (inaudible), I am convinced that we can overcome this challenge, we can meet it – we can meet it and we can meet it together.

So it’s wonderful to be here to see the amazing work that UNEP is doing here in Kenya, but also around the world. We have a lot of work to do, but we have very strong partners to do it. Thank you. (Applause.)


read more
Canadian army

As more military troops head to British Columbia, experts call for civilian disaster response solution


Like the Canadian Armed Forces send additional troops To respond to the flooding in British Columbia, military and disaster management experts say now is the time to invest in civilian response teams.

This week’s catastrophic rainfall has left a handful of cities underwater, displaced thousands of people, killed at least one and caused millions of dollars in critical infrastructure damage.


Click to play video:







Floods in British Columbia: Trudeau says “hundreds” of military personnel deployed to help with disaster


Floods in British Columbia: Trudeau says “hundreds” of military personnel deployed to help with disaster

According to federal statistics, the number of calls for a military response to natural disasters has nearly doubled over the past decade. Five of 23 calls for help in the past four years have come from British Columbia

The story continues under the ad

Read more:

Canadian Army Boosts Air Support to Help BC Flood Evacuations and Supply Chain Chaos

“With the increase in natural disasters that we are seeing as a result of climate change, and in terms of scale, scope and frequency, we have to start saying, ‘is there another alternative? »Is there a better way? Said Josh Bowen, instructor in the faculty of disaster and emergency management at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.

Bowen, a veteran and former deputy director of CAF disaster and emergency response plans in Edmonton, said the military is a “force of last resort” in disaster situations and is on a budget. limit.

It is the only force in Canada with the expertise to respond immediately and effectively to a natural disaster, he added, but that may not be enough as the effects of climate change intensify.

“What I would say is we need to look at what our neighbors are doing, what our NATO allies are doing, what our G20 allies are doing so that we can have a civilian response capability,” Bowen said. .


Click to play the video:







Flooding in British Columbia: Premier John Horgan announces provincial state of emergency due to flooding


Flooding in British Columbia: Premier John Horgan announces provincial state of emergency due to flooding

Countries like Germany and Australia have formalized large pools of civilian volunteers to respond to disasters – a much cheaper option than deploying the military.

The story continues under the ad

According to Bowen, every dollar spent on disaster mitigation and prevention saves $ 6 in disaster response and recovery, which is why provinces must invest in localized solutions.

This includes not only civilian response teams and their training, but also more climate-smart land use planning.

Read more:

‘Goods are coming’: appeals for patience in British Columbia following reports of panic buying

Details of the military’s deployment to British Columbia were still being finalized on Wednesday, a spokesperson for the Canadian Joint Operations Command told Global News.

Examples of support that could come include transport assistance, supply chain support to move resources from one point to another, and humanitarian aid, although details remain to be worked out.

“Yes, the military can do it, the question is, should the military do it? Asked Christian Leuprecht, security expert and professor at Royal Military College and Queen’s University.

“It’s not like the military doesn’t have other things going on – the military is completely exhausted with what we’re already asking them to do.”


Click to play video:







Flooding in British Columbia leaves Saskatchewan truckers expecting delays and farmers brace for backlog


Flooding in British Columbia leaves Saskatchewan truckers expecting delays and farmers brace for backlog

In 2021, Canadian troops were deployed to support provinces in both the COVID-19 pandemic and the wildfires. The budget of the Department of National Defense is approximately $ 23 billion for 2021-2022.

The story continues under the ad

“One of the challenges is that, as long as the provinces know they can always ask the federal government to bail them out when things go wrong, the provinces and municipalities have an incentive to underinvest in critical infrastructure,” he said. declared Leuprecht.

The military is not in the best position to repair underfunded municipal infrastructure, he said, nor to provide food, logistical support and “medium-term” aid.

Read more:

Three people still missing in deadly mudslide on Highway 99 in British Columbia

Adam McDonald, a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science at Dalhousie University and a member of the Canada International Council think tank, said there was no system in place for provinces to share resources or move their resources. assets across the country in the event of a disaster.

The federal government must make a political decision on the real priorities and responsibilities of the military, he added, as climate disasters escalate.

“The biggest concern is that everyone is going to think that the military is going to step in and solve these problems, when in fact the military is really good as a stopgap measure when existing measures are outdated,” he said. Explain.

“I think unfortunately this side of the house is under very careful thought and it will be a disservice to Canadians across the country if we don’t start planning for this. “

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.



read more
International headquarters

American teacher Keishia Thorpe wins 2021 million dollar Global Teacher Prize – News


Jeremiah Thoronka from Sierra Leone wins Chegg.org Global Student Prize 2021



Posted: Wed, 10 Nov 2021, 11:15 PM

Last update: Wed 10 Nov 2021, 11:45 PM

American teacher Keishia Thorpe, who opened up university education to low-income, first-generation American students, immigrants and refugees, was named the recipient of the 2021 Varkey Foundation Global Teachers’ Award held on Wednesday at Unesco headquarters in Paris. .

Now in its seventh year, the million dollar prize is the largest prize of its kind and is organized in partnership with Unesco.

Keishia, an English teacher at International High School Langley Park, Bladensburg, Maryland, was selected from over 8,000 nominations and nominations for the Global Teacher Prize from 121 countries around the world.

Meanwhile, Jeremiah Thoronka, a student from Sierra Leone, who invented a device that uses the kinetic energy of traffic and pedestrians to generate clean energy, has been named the winner of the Chegg.org Global Student Prize. 2021.

French actress Isabelle Huppert announced that Keishia was the winner of the Global Teacher Prize and actor Hugh Jackman announced that Jeremiah was the winner of the first Global Student Prize.

Jeremiah, 21, is the first recipient of this new $ 100,000 sister prize of the Global Teacher Prize which is awarded to an outstanding student who has made a real impact on learning, the lives of their peers and society at- of the.

Together, the Global Teacher Prize and the Global Student Prize tell inspiring stories from both sides of the education sector.

Keishia teaches English to grade 12 students at International High School Langley Park in Maryland. 100 percent of its students learn English and 95 percent identify as low income.

Keishia has completely redesigned the English department’s curriculum to make it culturally relevant to its students who are first generation Americans, immigrants or refugees primarily from Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean and South America. South and central.

As a result of her interventions, her students showed a 40 percent increase in their reading, which helped the school meet its growth rate against target with a 10 percent increase in reading. WIDA scores for 2019-2020 and highest in the school district for ELLs.

Keishia spends a tremendous amount of time encouraging her high school students to apply to college, helping them with their applications, and helping them get fully funded scholarships.

Between the period of 2018 and 2019 alone, she helped her students earn more than $ 6.7 million in scholarships at 11 different colleges, nearly 100 of which were tuition-free.

Jeremiah, meanwhile, was born amid the fighting of the civil war in Sierra Leone and raised with his single mother in a slum for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the capital Freetown. He had to burn charcoal and wood for light and heat.

Jeremy saw with his own eyes how, in addition to the photochemical smog that trivializes respiratory problems, his young contemporaries fell behind in their homework for lack of decent lighting.

Thus, life-threatening disadvantages and difficulties fueled Jeremiah’s passion for renewable energy and advocating for climate change. At 17, while studying at African Leadership University in Rwanda, he started a start-up called Optim Energy that turns vibrations from vehicles and pedestrians on the roads into an electric current.

Optim Energy has successfully carried out a pilot program in the districts of Jeremiah, Makawo in the northern part of Sierra Leone and Kuntoluh in the east of Freetown. With just two devices, the start-up provided free electricity to 150 homes with around 1,500 citizens, as well as 15 schools attended by more than 9,000 students.

Congratulating the winners, Sunny Varkey, Founder of the Varkey Foundation, said: “Congratulations to Keishia for winning the Global Teacher Prize 2021 and to Jeremiah for becoming the very first winner of the Chegg.org Global Student Prize. Their incredible stories show the vital role education plays in meeting the great challenges of today and tomorrow.

Stefania Giannini, Assistant Director-General for Education at Unesco, also congratulated the couple.

“Unesco was proud to host the World Teachers’ Prize this year at our headquarters in Paris. Inspirational teachers and amazing students deserve to be recognized for their commitment to education amid today’s learning crisis. Now more than ever, we must honor and support our teachers and students as they seek to rebuild a better world in the aftermath of Covid, “she said.

Actor and humanitarian Hugh Jackman emphasized the importance of listening to the voices of students.

“Students everywhere are fighting for their future. They are part of a generation that is on the front lines of the greatest challenges of our time, from climate change to global inequalities. So we need to listen to their voices and bring their stories to light.

To every dedicated student around the world who works hard to build a better future, we thank you for all you do while continuing your education, ”he said.

READ ALSO :

Congratulating Jeremiah, Jackman added, “You have made a huge difference for your community and beyond. I’m sure you will now use this amazing platform to make an even bigger impact.”


read more
International headquarters

5 takeaways from Friday at COP26


Protesters demonstrated in Glasgow, Scotland at a youth-led climate rally on Friday. Photo by AFP / Getty Images

It has been a long week at the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow and after a flurry of big announcements in recent days, the theme for Friday was the impact of climate change on future generations.

Here’s what happened if you missed it.

“Green wash festival”

Attention has shifted from the suits and briefcases of the conference venue to the city center, where thousands of children made sure their voices were heard while walking through the city.

Young activists from all over the world have flocked to Glasgow, demand action from leaders during a Fridays for Future event.

Event headliner Greta Thunberg called the COP event a “global northern greenwashing festival” and said “it should be obvious that we cannot solve a crisis the same way. that got us there in the first place. “

A word on the “good news” from the IEA

Several analysts have poured cold water on the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) assessment that global warming could be limited to 1.8 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2100, if all the COP26 commitments made on Wednesday evening are respected on time. COP26 President Alok Sharma asked the IEA to keep an eye on the commitments.

Mark Maslin, professor of earth sciences at University College London, was not convinced. “This is irresponsible, because it is only true if all of the country’s commitments are kept and their policies are 100% effective – which they never are,” Maslin told CNN. “It’s almost as if the IEA wants to tell everyone that the job is done and that we have solved climate change, when we climate scientists know that we are still a long way from 2 degrees let alone 1.5 degrees. “

Al Gore says the tools are in our hands

Former US Vice President Al Gore praised the young people who marched in Glasgow on Friday. Speaking at the official conference, he said world leaders must “legitimize their expectations for a future that is worthy of them”.

“We can do it, but we have to put the period of delay, distraction and opportunity in the past, recognize that we have entered a period of consequences and make it a period of solutions,” he said. .

Gore, a strong advocate for climate change, said humanity has the power to save the world, if the political will can be mustered. “It’s like we can flip a switch and save the future of our civilization,” Gore said. He also highlighted a common theme this week: that promises are big, but must be kept to have an impact.

“We have the tools we need to resolve the crisis. We have heard promises that will move us in the right direction towards those solutions. We need to make sure those promises are kept,” Gore said.

The US plan to make carbon capture cheaper

US Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm announced Friday that the Department of Energy has a new goal: to dramatically reduce the cost of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Granholm told COP26 on Friday that the DOE’s goal is to reduce the cost to $ 100 per tonne of carbon by 2030. At present, the department estimates that it costs around $ 2,000 per tonne.

Scientists say removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is crucial to achieving net zero emissions by 2050 and keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. But the technology is still relatively young and incredibly expensive. It also needs to be dramatically increased in order to reduce what humans have already emitted.

Negotiators at work

The first week of the COP26 summit will end on Saturday and negotiations on some of the key aspects of the Paris Agreement are well advanced. National delegates are still trying to figure out how to implement article six of the treaty, which defines the need for carbon emissions trading.

They are also trying to reach agreement on transparency rules for emission reductions, which include questions such as how often countries must report on their progress and how to avoid double counting.


read more
Non profit living

Amid climate talk, an actor’s call to action unfolds on stage


Actor Fehinti Balogun knows that theater can mobilize people towards climate action, because that’s what he has done for him.

In 2017, while preparing for a role in “Myth,” a climate parable, he started reading books about climate change and became alarmed at the unusually hot summer he was experiencing in England. The play itself called on him and the other actors to repeat the same mundane lines over and over, to the point of absurdity, as their surroundings terrifically fractured around them – the ridged walls of oil, the stove on fire, the freezer oozing water.

The whole experience changed her life, Balogun said. Suddenly, nothing seemed more important than tackling the global crisis. Not even land the head of a West End production (a long coveted dream) of “The Importance of Being Serious”. His growing anxiety made him feel like he was experiencing a real version of the “Myth” in which society repeated the same old scenario even as the planet fell into chaos.

“Knowing everything I’ve done made me angry with the world for doing nothing,” Balogun, 26, (“Dune”, “I can destroy you”) said in a telephone interview. “I didn’t understand how we weren’t upset.”

That sense of urgency is what he said he hopes to convey to audiences on “Can I Live?” », A new play he wrote, performed and created with the Complicité theater company. A filmed version of the play, which also features supporting actors and musicians and was originally intended as a live performance, was screened on Monday as part of COP26, the United Nations climate meeting. in Glasgow. The resulting artwork is as innovative as any play to emerge during the Covid-19 era: initially it seems like just an intimate Zoom session with Balogun, but evolves into an explosive mix. spoken word, animation, hip-hop and dialogue.

The hour-long production, which the Barbican Center has made available to stream on its website until November 12, combines scientific facts about how the greenhouse effect works with the story of Balogun’s own journey into the climate movement. He also emphasizes the gap between the predominantly white environmental groups he has joined and the experiences of his predominantly black friends and family.

Throughout the show, Balogun answers phone calls from family members about issues seemingly unrelated to the centerpiece of the room, asking when he is getting married or why he left a bag in the hallway. at home. Although at first it seems like they interrupt Balogun’s main narrative of ‘shows, shows, shows’ as he sings at one point, their interjections hammer home one of his central ideas: if the movement is unwilling to prioritize someone like his Nigerian grandmother, he misses the point. Climate action, in other words, is for ordinary people with everyday concerns.

“The aim is to make popular activism accessible and to represent people of color and people of the working class,” he said. To that end, he interweaves his own story with that of Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who campaigned against destructive oil extraction on behalf of his Ogoni people. “Very often we don’t talk about the Global South,” Balogun said. “We are not talking about the communities that have been fighting this fight for years.

Although Balogun is the only theater artist on the official COP26 program, he is certainly not the first playwright to tackle climate themes. Climate Change Theater Action, an initiative of the nonprofit Arctic Cycle, was created to encourage theatrical creation that could draw more attention to COP21, the United Nations climate meeting in 2015 that culminated in to the historic Paris Agreement. (The theater group has never been officially affiliated with any of the annual COP meetings.)

Since its creation, the group has produced 200 works which have been performed in front of 40,000 people in 30 countries, said its co-founder, Chantal Bilodeau. The organization commissions plays on environmental themes, remunerates the authors and then provides the scripts free of charge to theater companies, schools or any other group that wishes to stage readings or productions.

The first year, Bilodeau said, they ended up with “a lot of depressing parts.” Now they’re trying to steer playwrights away from dystopia and toward visions of a liveable future, and encourage those who direct the works to pair them with programming that helps audiences better understand the issues.

Lanxing Fu, co-director of the nonprofit Superhero Clubhouse in New York City, devotes some of her time to those who will be most affected by a warmer planet: the next generation. Through Superhero Clubhouse’s Big Green Theater after-school program, run in conjunction with the Bushwick Starr and the Astoria Performing Arts Center, students at Brooklyn and Queens public elementary schools are learning about climate issues and writing plays in response to what ‘they learn.

More than a decade after the program began, Fu said that what is most striking about the student’s plays is how young writers instinctively understand a fundamental truth about the climate that escapes many. adults: to find long term solutions, we will need to work together.

“A huge element of climate resilience is in the community we build and the way we come together,” she said. “It is always very present in their stories; it’s often part of how something resolves.

Queens-based TV playwright and screenwriter Dorothy Fortenberry also spends a lot of time reflecting on children’s roles in the movement. His play “The Lotus Paradox,” which premieres in January at the Warehouse Theater in Greenville, SC, asks: What happens when children are constantly being told that it is their job to? save the world ? Like much of Fortenberry’s work on television (she is a writer on “The Handmaid’s Tale”), “The Lotus Paradox ”includes the subject of climate change without making it the singular center of the story.

“If you make a story about anything, anywhere, and you not having climate change in it is a science fiction story, ”she said. “You made the choice to make the story less realistic than it otherwise would have been.”

It is a feeling also shared by Anaïs Mitchell, musician and author of the musical “Hadestown, ” which reopened on Broadway in September. In his account of Greek mythology, Hades is portrayed in the song as a greedy “oil and coal king” who fuels his industrialized underworld hell with the “fossils of the dead”. Above the ground, the main characters, Orpheus and Eurydice, suffer from food shortages and brutal weather that is “either scorching heat or freezing cold”, a framing inspired by the headlines on climate refugees.

It’s worth fighting intentionally with climate narratives in theater, not only because they make plays more believable, Mitchell said, but also because theater might just be one of the best tools for dealing with such themes. . Like Orpheus trying to put things right with a song that shows “how the world could be, despite what it is”, Mitchell sees theater as a powerful tool to help us imagine our path to a better future.

“The theater is able to open our hearts and our eyes to an alternative reality to the one we live in,” she said.

This is why Balogun – although he notices it more than once in “Can I Live? “ that he is “not a scientist” – said he believed he had an equally crucial role to play as any climatologist. “Scientists are begging artists and theater makers to help get this message across,” he said. “And there is a need for it more than ever. “


read more
History organization

It’s the decade to cut emissions


As the sun rose in Glasgow, more than 20,000 people – delegates from individual nations, representatives of non-governmental organizations and activists – gathered in Scotland for the start of the United Nations climate conference. two weeks. Known as the Conference of the Parties or COP 26, it takes place from Monday November 1 to Friday November 12, 2021.

COP 26 will mainly focus on two things: (1) commitments on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and (2) financing and technology transfers from developed countries to developing countries, to help them cope with and adapt to climate change.

This year’s climate negotiations are important because, under the 2015 Paris Agreement, countries must submit information to the UN detailing their plans to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Although discussions on GHGs tend to focus on carbon dioxide (CO2), GHG emissions also include methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N20). The UN aggregates the commitments, called Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and assesses the cumulative impact.

The Paris Agreement, which was adopted at COP 21 in Paris in 2015 and entered into force in 2016, stipulated that NDCs were to be reported every five years, with the intention of increasing commitments over time. time. The submission deadline was 2020, and 194 of 197 parties submitted their first NDCs.

The Paris Agreement also established a target to take action to limit the increase in average global temperature to well below 2.0 degrees Celsius and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit), considered by many countries, especially countries in sub-Saharan Africa and low-lying islands. , be the limit. “1.5 to stay alive,” as the island nations say.

Unfortunately, the nations at the top have made little progress on these issues leading up to COP 26. According to the UN, the commitments made so far will not reduce emissions but will actually allow them to increase by 16%. The current commitments would result in a temperature increase of 2.7 degrees Celsius (4.9 degrees Fahrenheit).

Historically, developed countries (in the UN parlance), such as EU countries and the United States, are the biggest emitters. The EU initially pledged to reduce its GHG emissions by 40% by 2030 based on 1990 levels. In December 2020, it updated its pledges for a more ambitious 55% reduction. by 2030, based on 1990 levels. EU supply is in line with reduction targets recommended by most scientific bodies.

Overall, current commitments would reduce CO emissions2 emissions by only 7% by 2030. But the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Program, for example, argues that GHGs must be reduced by 45% by 2030 based on 2010 levels, then reduced to net zero by 2050, in order to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) and d ” avoid irreversible climate change.

The United States has said it will reduce its GHG emissions by 50 to 52% by 2030—based on 2005 levels. While most countries use 1990 as a benchmark, the United States uses 2005, which means their commitments are actually lower. The current 50 to 52 percent of the United States appears to be close to the 55 percent of the EU, but is actually 13 to 14 percent under the 2005 baseline scenario. Accounting tricks will not solve the climate crisis. (Many states in the United States, such as California, Massachusetts, and Washington, use 1990 as a benchmark for emissions.)

Germany, on the other hand, has increased its cuts from 55% to 65% by 2030 based on 1990 levels. Yet although the amount appears large, to achieve this, Germany would have to phase out coal. by 2030, as will the major producing countries of China, India, the United States, Indonesia, Australia and Russia. UN Secretary General António Guterres has called for “no new coal by 2021”. And the president of the COP 26, Alok Sharma, demanded that the meeting of the UNO “entrust the coal to history”. The Powering Past Coal Alliance, a group of 137 countries, regions, cities and organizations working to accelerate the phase-out of coal-fired power plants, will do everything possible to ensure that COP 26 throws coal in the dustbin of history.

Developing countries, like China and India, have proposed cuts based on their economic growth. (Developing countries like China and India still remember historic inequalities in emissions production.) In 2020, China said it will aim to be net zero by 2060 and that its emissions would peak by 2035. Chinese President Xi Jinping will not attend COP 26. In his stead, Chinese Climate Envoy Xie Zhenhua and Vice Minister Zhao Yingmin will lead the delegation and provide China’s commitment to the NDC.

In 2016, India proposed a reduction of 33 to 35 percent by 2030 based on 2005 levels and has yet to submit its 2020 NDC target. Indian Prime Minister Modi will attend COP 26.

Limiting methane emissions will also be discussed. Methane is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere. In September, the US and the EU unveiled the Global Methane Pledge, which aims to reduce methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030 based on 2020 levels. Already more than 35 countries have signed the Global Methane Pledge.

Ambitions have been lowered somewhat in recent weeks by the US President’s special climate envoy John Kerry. Chinese President Xi Jinping, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and South African President Cyril Ramaphosa will not be in attendance. That said, Biden and many other heads of state will be in attendance. COP 26 will be vital in putting pressure on world leaders to take action and reduce emissions.

AIn addition to emission reductions, finance is a key topic in the UN climate negotiations.

Developed countries have agreed to provide funding to developing countries to help them adapt to the impacts of the climate crisis, such as sea level rise and drought. One hundred billion dollars a year has been pledged to developing countries, a commitment that dates back to the 2009 climate conference in Copenhagen.

This amount is, however, much lower than the amounts claimed by negotiators from various groups of nations, such as the African Group, the Alliance of Small Island States, and the least developed countries and small island developing States, which have the least. contributed to and have already suffered the worst impacts of global warming. And since 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, developed countries have contributed less than $ 90 billion, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In 2018, the OECD, together with the UN and the World Bank released a report indicating that $ 6.9 trillion would be needed annually until 2020 to ensure the resilience of developing countries.

As key climate negotiators and NGOs discuss these issues in the negotiating rooms, activists will take to the streets throughout the week to advocate for climate justice. A wave of protests will take place during COP 26, possibly the largest in Scotland since those against the Iraq war in 2003. Yesterday, Extinction Rebellion’s Deep Water Rising actions highlighted how the burning of fossil fuels results in a sea ​​level rise. Friday, a march organized by young people, Fridays for Future, will take place. On Saturday, a Global Day of Action for Climate Justice will follow, with marches planned in Glasgow, London and around the world. And on Sunday, the People’s Summit for Climate Justice will launch a series of in-person and online workshops and events. This week, 350.org is also organizing a Global Week of Action. These actions in Glasgow and around the world will inspire COP 26 negotiators to set high ambitions and take action. Time is running out, because it is the decade to reduce emissions.


read more
International headquarters

Emirates News Agency – World Council of Muslim Communities Announces International Conference “Islamic Unity: Concept, Opportunities, Challenges”


ABU DHABI, October 31, 2021 (WAM) – The World Council of Muslim Communities held a press conference at the Council’s headquarters in Abu Dhabi, with the participation of Dr Ali Rashid Al Nuaimi, Chairman of the Council, and Dr Mohamed Bechari , the Secretary General, to announce the schedule of the International Conference, entitled “Islamic Unity: Concept, Opportunities, Challenges”, to be held from December 12 to 14 in Abu Dhabi.

Dr. Al Nuaimi announced the holding of the conference, under the patronage of Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister of Tolerance and Coexistence.

The importance of the conference stems from the need to present an intellectual and legal discourse that fills the void that exists among Muslim communities around the world, to meet the challenge of belonging to contemporary Muslim society, which confirms the role pioneer of academics and thinkers in leading the nation, and presenting an intellectual and legitimate proposal up to the demands of the time.

Al Nuaimi said that one of the conference’s goals is to lead a discourse that stems from the values ​​of coexistence pursued by the UAE, in terms of partnering with others. “We truly believe in this positive partnership of working together to build nations and face the challenges facing humanity everywhere, such as climate change, pandemics, poverty or unemployment, and create opportunities for young people, ”he added.

The President of the Council underlined the importance of the pioneering role of the scholars and thinkers of the nation by presenting a discourse based on legitimate foundations, taking into account the peculiarities of that time, respecting its regulations and laws, and establishing a better future for Muslims and non-Muslims, especially with the existence of certain discourses that divide humanity and serve agendas that harm Muslims wherever they are. He noted that the Council will wish to welcome as many Muslim scholars, thinkers and academic leaders as possible, so that a vision of Abu Dhabi is presented to the world in the service of Muslims and non-Muslims, as regards concerns the concept of Islamic unity. and opens horizons for opportunities that must be invested in the present and the future, to develop strategies to deal with the challenges that Muslims face wherever they are.

The World Council of Muslim Communities is an international non-governmental organization headquartered in Abu Dhabi. It includes more than 900 Islamic organizations and institutions from 142 countries, aiming to achieve one goal: the integration of Muslim communities in their countries, and for its members to obtain full citizenship and full affiliation with the Islamic religion.


read more
Canadian army

Canada’s Justin Trudeau unveils his new cabinet | Politics News


Former Greenpeace member Steven Guilbeault will take over as environment minister and a new defense minister has been appointed.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveiled his third cabinet since his first term in 2015, replacing the Minister of Defense and Minister of the Environment as his Liberal government seeks to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, improve its environmental record and to push back the political challenges of rival parties.

In Canada’s last national election last month, the Liberals won 159 out of 338 seats in the House of Commons, meaning they need the support of another party to pass legislation.

The left-wing New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Bloc Québécois, which presents candidates only in the French-speaking province of Quebec, should be possible legislative partners for the Liberals.

Trudeau said on Twitter on Tuesday that the new cabinet “will end the fight against COVID-19, make housing more affordable, fight climate change, create good jobs, take the path of reconciliation and build a better future for all” .

Steven Guilbeault, a former Greenpeace staff member who represents a riding in Quebec, will be Canada’s new Minister of the Environment. He replaces Jonathan Wilkinson who will move to the natural resources portfolio.

Guilbeault’s appointment came just before the UN climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland. Trudeau is expected to attend the talks and Canada’s environmental record should be scrutinized.

Peter Donolo, political strategist at public relations firm Hill + Knowlton and director of communications for former Liberal Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, told Reuters news agency that Trudeau aimed to “position Canada as a winner in a greener global economy in the long run. ”.

Trudeau consistently makes ambitious promises on climate change, but Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions have actually increased faster than any other G7 country since 2016, the first full year of his term, according to a June study. 2021 from the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives.

Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau speaks with Minister of Health Jean-Yves Duclos during the swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, October 26, 2021.[Blair Gable/Reuters]

Harjit Sajjan, a former Canadian military colonel who had served as defense minister since 2015, was removed from his post following a series of high-profile sexual misconduct scandals that rocked the upper echelons of the government. army. He will become Minister of International Development.

The new Defense Minister will be Anita Anand, who served as Minister of Utilities and Procurement during the pandemic and has been credited with securing the country’s vaccine supplies amid fierce competition.

Mélanie Joly will become Canada’s new Minister of Foreign Affairs, replacing former astronaut Marc Garneau, who will no longer sit in Cabinet.

Joly will have to deal with Canada’s strained relationship with China, among other foreign policy challenges.

Trudeau has promised a gender-balanced cabinet, and Canadian prime ministers typically try to represent different regions of the world’s second-largest country at the cabinet table, narrowing his options for Tuesday’s announcement.

Marci Ien, a former television reporter who defeated former Green Party leader Annamie Paul for a seat in downtown Toronto, will become Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Youth.

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, a former journalist and Reuters author whom political analysts have viewed as a candidate to eventually replace Trudeau as prime minister, will retain her high-level posts.

Former Minister of Health Patty Hajdu will become the new Minister of Indigenous Services. The Liberal government is committed to improving the conditions of aboriginal peoples in Canada, where some communities do not have access to safe drinking water.

Ahmed Hussen, a longtime minister in various portfolios who first arrived in Canada as a refugee, will become Minister of Housing, Diversity and Inclusion. The affordability of homes has become a major issue in Canada, especially during the coronavirus pandemic, as young families struggle to buy their first home.

Canada’s new cabinet has 38 members, including the Prime Minister.


read more
Canadian army

Reviews | Top 10 Reasons to Fund the Canadian Army


10. Government inflated? Misplaced priorities? The military is by far the largest department in the Canadian government, employing the most numbers and purchasing the most equipment. The combined budget of the Department of National Defense (DND) and Veterans Affairs is $ 30 billion, or approximately 15 times Environment and Climate Change Canada. With 0.5 percent of the world’s population, Canada is responsible for 1.5% international military spending.

9. DND has the largest intelligence gathering capabilities in the country. In recent years he has spied Black lives matter, Don’t slow down anymore and peace activists.

8. The Canadian Forces (CF) are “hostileTo “LGTBQ members”, concluded former Supreme Court justice Marie Deschamps in 2015. Members suspected of being homosexual were systematically excluded from the CF until 1992. In the 1960s, military researchers and the funding played a role Central role with the aim of developing a “fruit machine” to detect homosexuals.

7. DND / CF has the the biggest Public relations (propaganda) machine in the country, employing hundreds of “public relations professionals” to influence public perception of the military. Last fall, the military, the Ottawa Citizen reported, established “a new organization who will use propaganda and other techniques to try to influence the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of Canadians. unflattering stories about the military were to be the target of phone calls to their bosses, letters to the editor and other “flacks” intended to undermine their credibility in the eyes of readers and their employers.

6. The CF has been a hotbed of white supremacy. For decades, institutional racism has been explicit and imposed from above with force wanting only those of “Pure European Descent and the White Race”. Although they represent 20% of the Canadian population, visible minorities today constitute 9.6 percent of CF. Not surprisingly, the CF has attracted many people with far-right beliefs.

5. The Canadian Special Operations Forces Command (CANSOFCOM) is a secret army within the military. The government is under no obligation to divulge information about their operations so that they can be deployed on controversial missions, and the public is not more aware of this. Canadian special forces have (probably) operated in Haiti, Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Central African Republic, Congo, Peru, Iraq, Libya, Colombia, Afghanistan and elsewhere.

4. The CF is the institutional embodiment of “toxic masculinity”. For example, it was not until 2000 that the submarine service was opened to women. In 2015, Deschamps found a “culture of misogyny ”in the CF“ hostile to women ”. Between April 1, 2016 and March 9 of this year, there were 581 sexual assault and 221 complaints of sexual harassment involving CF members.

3. Canadian warships regularly deploy around the world, from the Caribbean to the North Sea, from the Persian Gulf to the Black Sea. Recently, Canadian ships participated in “freedom of navigation” exercises conducted by warring United States in the South China Sea. They also waged war on Libya in 2011, aided the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, and supported the 1998 bombing of that country. Threatening other countries to get our way has a long history. Canadian warships were dispatched force Costa Rica to negotiate with the Royal Bank in 1921, to protect British interests during the Mexican revolution and back a dictator slaughtering peasants in El Salvador in 1932.

2. The Canadian armed forces have a huge ecological footprint. They littered the landscape with tens of millions of bullets and shells as well as polluted dozens of lakes with ammunition. They continue to enlist animals in experiences and during the war. DND is by far the largest emitter of GHGs in the federal government. DND represented 59% percent of the federal government’s GHGs in 2019-2020. Incredibly, however, the military’s emissions are exempt from the government’s current GHG reduction targets.

1. The Canadian military has fought in nine wars, only one of which is morally justified.



read more
History organization

Jonathan Katz urges Elon community and nation to learn from history


Zemari Ahmadi was killed by a US drone strike in Afghanistan in August this year. Ahmadi, along with nine other members of his family, drove a vehicle that the United States mistakenly took for use by a branch of the Islamic State called ISIS-K.

According to author and journalist Johnathan Katz, this type of unapologetic brutality is not uncommon in countries around the world, including the United States. Liberal Arts Forum initiative, Katz spoke at Elon University on October 11 about the consequences of what he called the imperialist mentality and the danger of a desensitized nation.

Katz kicked off his lecture by highlighting the injustice against Ahmadi and his family. Not only were they civilians, but seven of the ten people killed in the strike were children. It was only after the United States received a backlash for the strike that the Pentagon admitted to any sort of wrongdoing. Ahmadi’s remaining family have still not received compensation or reparations, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Drawing on that concept, Katz gave a history lesson on the US occupation of Afghanistan and Haiti for nearly 20 years, as well as the Capitol Riot on January 6. Katz said these three instances can be used to examine and define America’s current economic, political and militaristic climate.

“These three places and their histories and their histories are actually very, very intertwined in a way that I think is instructive in understanding them individually, us as a country and people and understanding growth differently than we do, Americans, can take in the future, ”Katz said.

Katz was the only full-time US journalist in Haiti during the 2010 earthquake and Associated Press correspondent in Haiti from 2007 to 2011. He later revealed the story that United Nations soldiers likely caused cholera outbreak after earthquake that killed thousands. Katz has reported in more than a dozen countries and territories.

In 2011 he was awarded the Medill Medill for Courage in Journalism and in 2019 was National Fellow in New America. Katz also previously headed the Media & Journalism Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University, and still contributes frequently to the New York Times and other publications.

Katz is currently writing a book, “Gangsters of Capitalism”, on General Smedley Butler and the legacy of the American Empire. Its release is scheduled for January 18, 2022.

At the event, Katz described in depth the reasoning reported by America behind the occupation of Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2021. He also explained the motivations that did not been reported.

“If the reason we went to Afghanistan was to root out Osama bin Laden and destroy the Taliban government that offered him refuge, then this mission should have ended in 2011,” Katz said. “But the mission of war … continued for another decade, and that’s because [the U.S. government had] these other ideals.

From Katz’s perspective, the world’s superpowers have wreaked havoc on Third World countries under the guise of providing aid, education and “civilization.” Katz said that after millions of deaths, entire regions stripped of their resources, and the will of stronger, foreign nations being applied to the colonized, world powers want to forget the past and pretend every country is starting from the same. starting line.

Professor Linda Dunn, who teaches in Peace and Conflict Studies at Elon University, has been a member of a peace organization located in Alamance County for over 40 years. The group, which started as Peacemakers of Alamance County, has now grown into a chapter of Peace Action. Peace action is a national organization that focuses on efforts such as war, the nuclear threat, poverty, climate change and terrorism.

Dunn attended the conference to get Katz’s advice on how best to educate the masses on how people can be conscious and active citizens.

According to Dunn, the Alamance chapter of Action pour la paix has largely focused on educating people about the current state of the country and how it has become, which includes anchoring institutional racism and funding for the American military might. With concepts and ideals brought to the forefront of American minds in light of events such as the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the riot on the Capitol, Dunn said she believed it was more practical than ever to ‘educate the public.

“I have a lot of hope right now,” Dunn said. “I really believe that you young people are more and more aware of all of these issues – of how institutional racism and all of that stuff relates to this military abuse, and our mindset of spending so much money. money for war. “

Considering that Haiti was the first country in the world to abolish slavery and gain independence in 1804Katz said the nation takes great pride in holding its own identity and its own success. About a century after gaining independence, US troops occupied Haiti under the pretext of restore stability in the Caribbean.

According to Katz, during the 20 years of American occupation of Haiti, American troops reestablished slavery, overthrew the Haitian Parliament and emptied the country of its resources for American profit. Now, as the leader of the modern world, the United States still refuses to provide reparations or acknowledge that Haiti’s current state of suffering is its fault, Katz said.

Not only did Katz draw the same correlation from the US occupation of Afghanistan, but he also pointed to the Capitol insurgency earlier this year as a byproduct of the Americans’ response to US military might. Katz pointed out that not only is the United States responsible for the horrors of colonization, political instability and poverty, but the imposition of its strength and will always occurs – regardless of the consequences on human lives.

“I think the first thing we need to do is stop and look at ourselves in the mirror and look at our history,” Katz said. “This kind of awareness has come home in a major way, and Americans are not sure what to do with it – and so some Americans are looking to America first.”

Although this is not a new concept, Katz explained the effect of “brutalizing” a country like the United States, where people are becoming increasingly numb to destruction, to violence. death and poverty left in other countries by their own nation.

“It’s the fault line that exists in America right now, and there certainly is the fault line in a lot of individual Americans with ‘which way are we going to go,’” Katz said. “Are we going to be brutalized or are we going to stop at realizing ourselves?” “

In the wake of more people learning and sympathizing with the damage inflicted on less developed countries by global superpowers, Katz warned that without proper remedies, these war-torn countries would fall into more corrupt and hostile systems. In the case of reparations, Katz said there must be an acknowledgment of what has been stripped and stolen that has put developing countries at a disadvantage from the start.

“It’s the kind of thing that can allow you to take those experiences, hold onto that story and turn it into something more productive instead of just doubling and tripling the brutality,” Katz said.



read more
Canadian army

Canada does not accept China’s request to join Pacific Rim trade deal


OTTAWA – Canada is giving China a cold shoulder over its interest in joining an 11-country trade bloc in the Pacific region that is seen as an important gateway to diversifying Canadian trade with d other Asian countries.

A spokesperson for International Trade Minister Mary Ng said Canada recognizes China’s desire to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but has yet to had discussions with the People’s Republic on this matter.

“We are aware of China’s interest,” Ng spokesman Chris Zhou said in an email response to questions.

“All decisions are made by consensus, and any country that joins the CPTPP must adhere to the high-quality rules and ambitious market access commitments of the CPTPP.”

Canada’s language on China’s potential accession to the pact reflects the stance taken by new Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida after taking office on Monday.

Trade analysts say Canada should vigorously oppose China’s entry into the trade pact which also includes Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

They say the safe return to Canada of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor gives the federal government more leeway to verbally oppose China’s entry into the pact. The two Canadian men were arrested in apparent retaliation for the December 2018 arrest of Chinese high-tech leader Meng Wanzhou under a US extradition warrant.

Meng returned to China last month, just hours after the United States withdrew its extradition request and a British Columbia court terminated legal proceedings against her. This paved the way for the immediate release of Kovrig and Spavor who were repatriated to Canada at the exact moment of Meng’s departure.

“Canada has no reason to do China a favor. Their appalling behavior towards Canada over the past two years, including belligerent and belligerent criticism of Canada Ǫ provides all the justifications for a cold, if not frosty, Canadian response to China’s request to the CPTPP, ”said Lawrence Herman, international trade lawyer and former Canadian diplomat.

Canada may be much smaller than China, but its membership in the larger CPTPP allows it to use its “leverage and influence” to counter “China’s aggressiveness,” Herman said.

Meredith Lilly, Simon Reisman Chair in Trade Policy at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, said Canada need not necessarily endorse or reject China’s candidacy, because the he trade agreement already contains firm rules regarding criteria for new members.

“China is currently not meeting the standards or ambition set by the accession process to join the CPTPP, and China is expected to undertake a series of reforms to be taken seriously in areas such as state-owned enterprises, subsidies national, labor and human rights. and supply, ”Lilly said.

“I think it would be a mistake for CPTPP members to dilute the deal to accommodate any new members.”

Guy Saint-Jacques, former Canadian ambassador to China, said China failed to honor commitments it made two decades ago when it joined the World Trade Organization.

“Knowing how difficult it remains for foreign companies to operate in China compared to Chinese companies that want to operate here,” Saint-Jacques said, “we need to base our approach much more on reciprocity.”

China applied to join the CPTPP in mid-September, and Taiwan followed suit with its own candidacy a week later. The move angered China, which opposes Taiwan’s involvement in all international arenas because it views the island as a separatist province.

China has stepped up military intimidation against Taiwan in recent days, flying more than 50 fighter jets to the island on Monday.

Saint-Jacques and Lilly said Canada should endorse Taiwan as a member of the CPTPP.

“Of course China is going to go mad, but you know China is not ready,” Saint-Jacques said.

“Once appointed, Canada’s next trade minister should publicly recognize Taiwan’s candidacy, sending an early signal that Canada will give its full attention to Taiwan’s candidacy,” said Lilly.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also affirmed Canada’s solidarity with its two biggest CPTPP partners in recent days.

He spoke on the phone Monday with his Australian counterpart, Scott Morrison. “The two leaders discussed the close cooperation between Canada and Australia to strengthen global trade and uphold human rights as well as the rules-based international order,” said an excerpt from the office. by Trudeau published Tuesday.

And on Monday, his office released a statement congratulating Kishida.

“Our extensive trade and investment ties, underpinned by the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, contribute greatly to our economic security,” said Trudeau.

“Together, we will advance our shared vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific and take ambitious action in the fight against climate change.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 5, 2021.


read more
International headquarters

Daimler trucks, luxury cars split up


title=s

The head office of Daimler AG reflected in a window in Stuttgart, Germany on Thursday, September 30, 2021. The shareholders of Daimler AG, maker of luxury cars Mercedes-Benz, have an extraordinary online meeting on Friday, October 1, 2021, on the spin-off of the company’s truck activity. (Marijan Murat / dpa via AP)

PA

Shareholders of Daimler AG, luxury car maker Mercedes-Benz, approved the spin-off of the company’s truck division on Friday, a move intended to enable the world’s largest truck maker to respond more quickly to change and to focus on new low emission technologies transforming the automotive industry.

Voting at an online shareholders’ meeting also means that Stuttgart-based Daimler will rename itself Mercedes-Benz Group AG as of February 1, 2022.

Daimler CEO Ola Kallenius said that “by unleashing the full potential of both companies, we are establishing two undisputed innovation leaders who will set the tone in transforming their industries.”

One of the reasons for this fallout is that luxury cars and trucks are pursuing different technological approaches to develop local zero-emission vehicles, with Mercedes-Benz focusing on battery-powered cars while the truck industry is developing high-powered vehicles. hydrogen for long distance transport. This move aims to enable different companies to make faster and more independent decisions in a rapidly changing environment and to serve distinct customer bases.

The company claims that luxury cars and big trucks are fundamentally different businesses. The Mercedes-Benz automotive division sells a luxury product to affluent consumers, while the trucks division sells expensive products to companies focused on return on investment. The split of the two companies will, Daimler hopes, reduce what it calls a conglomerate rebate, meaning the two companies would be worth more separately than they are together.

Daimler Truck Tests GenH2 Long-Haul Truck That Uses Liquid Hydrogen To Generate Electricity From A Fuel Cell; the vehicle could be ready for use by 2027 if the hydrogen fuel infrastructure is ready. Hydrogen trucks will be needed as the growing number of electric vehicles puts increased pressure on the electricity grid, as stricter emission standards in Europe to tackle climate change require more electric cars. “Europe needs a hydrogen economy,” said Martin Daum, CEO of Daimler Truck.

Daimler Truck includes Freightliner trucks manufactured in Cleveland, North Carolina, Mt. Holly, North Carolina, and Santiago Tianguistenco, Mexico, as well as its North American headquarters and style and test centers in Portland, Oregon.

The demerger was approved at 99.9% of the capital represented and the name change at 99.9%, with 56.4% of the capital represented at the meeting.

Daimler shareholders must get one share of Daimler Truck Holding AG for every two shares they own, which gives them 65% of the new company. Daimler will retain a minority stake of 35%. The company expects listing to take place later this year on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange.


read more
Non profit living

10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree


A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

Register now: Be smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter


read more
Canadian army

Evening briefing: Freeland keeps cabinet concerts


Tonight’s Evening Brief is brought to you by iPoliticsINTEL. Daily Watch INTEL Briefs are a concise rundown of the day’s committee meetings in the House and Senate – delivered to your inbox each morning. Learn more.

Good evening to you.

It was said today that Parliament would return before the end of the fall. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has also said his cabinet will be sworn in next month. As to who will attend, all we know at this point is that Chrystia Freeland will remain Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister. The cabinet will have an equal number of women and men around the table, what Trudeau has called a “basic starting point”, and there will also be an “appropriate regional distribution”.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland, who will remain Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister. (Sean Kilpatrick / The Canadian Press)

In his first full press conference since last Monday’s federal election, Trudeau said the government’s top priorities are to: continue to sign child care agreements with the provinces; the introduction of 10 days of paid sick leave in federally regulated workplaces; make housing more affordable; work on indigenous reconciliation; and fight against climate change.

It comes like Members of Parliament arrive on the Hill and begin their orientation, and Kevin Vuong is preparing to sit in the House as an independent.

Now that the federal election is over, negotiations to bring Ontario into Ottawa’s child care plan can resume – and sources on both sides say they are headed in the right direction. Charlie Pinkerton has more.

In response to a reporter’s question, Trudeau said he would decide whether or not to ban Chinese tech giant Huawei from Canada’s telecommunications network in the coming weeks. He has largely dodged the case for the two and a half years that Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor have been detained in China. Aidan Chamandy has more.

Meanwhile, at the United Nations General Assembly, the two recently released detainees were at the center of a verbal fight between Canada and China today. Foreign Minister Marc Garneau told officials around the world that Canada is applying both Canadian and international law in response to the US request for extradition of Huawei leader Meng Wanzhou, while the two Michaels were paying a “heavy price” for Canada’s commitment to the rule of law. “We continue to oppose the way these two citizens were treated,” he said, adding that Canada “will never forget this experience.” More information on this in Global News.

Jessica Lovell / Metroland

On COVID-19, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is now recommend that seniors in long-term care homes, retirement homes and assisted living facilities receive vaccine boosters. Given their day-to-day interactions with staff and other residents, their age, and other pre-existing underlying medical conditions, this is a population that is at increased risk for serious illness from the virus. NACI cited the time that has elapsed since this population received their initial injections, as well as the weakening of the immune response that can occur with age when recommending going beyond the two doses. regular.

In Quebec, Minister of Health Christian Dubé announced that public health officials in the province recommend that people in these care settings receive a third dose. CBC News reports.

Still in Quebec, major-general. Fortin was in court today to demand his reinstatement as head of federal vaccine deployment. As CBC News reports, the government says that role no longer exists.

Process Nerd: Do the Greens even need an interim leader?

Comings and goings: lawyer McMillan adds communications staff

Net Zero: Industry Groups Oppose Federal Clean Fuel Standard

The Sprout: Ontario farm charged after deadly COVID outbreak

In other titles:

Elizabeth May has been proposed as potential interim leader of the struggling Green Party (CP)
Canadians Unhappy But Not Angry With Federal Election Result: Poll (CP)
Science Table Says Ontario’s 4th Wave Has ‘Flattened’ And Releases ‘A Wide Range’ Of Case Projections (Global)
Albertans die from COVID-19 at more than three times the average Canadian rate (SRC)
BC data shows dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases among school-aged children (Global)
Travelers to Prince Edward Island will be tested for COVID-19 at its borders starting Thursday (CP)
A “potential anomaly” with the ballot boxes leads to a recount in the riding of Châteauguay — Lacolle (CP)
Don’t Stop Federal COVID-19 Benefits, Companies Say As Expiration Approaches (Global)

Internationally:

South of the border, General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, today warned that Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan could threaten the United States in as little as 12 months. In an appearance before Congress to answer questions about last month’s withdrawal, he said the Taliban, which now controls Afghanistan, is still a terrorist organization with links to al Qaeda.

General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (Photo: Matthew Moeller, US Army)

As the Associated Press reports, he called the 20-year war in Afghanistan a “strategic failure” and said his preference would have been to keep several thousand troops in the country to prevent a collapse of the Afghan government and subsequent takeover by the Taliban. In his testimony, the US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin admitted that the collapse of the Afghan army that international troops had spent two decades bringing about “Took us all by surprise”.

Meanwhile, Milley also defended his decision during the last days of Donald Trump’s presidency to call on China to reassure officials that the former president was not going to attack.

“Rebuild better, blah blah blah. Green economy, blah blah blah. Net zero by 2050, blah blah blah. At conference in Milan today, sacred words and inaction, she also urged people not to give up hope, saying change is “not only possible, but urgently needed”.

In other international titles:

US government will run out of cash by Oct. 18, treasury secretary says (CNN)
WHO horrified by sexual exploitation by aid workers in DR Congo (BBC)
Dutch police arrest politician over alleged plot to assassinate prime minister (BBC)
‘Capital Gazette’ gunman sentenced to several life sentences, plus 345 years (NPR)
PM Haiti: Elections, referendum scheduled for next year (PA)
Greece, France tout European defense autonomy with warship deal (Al Jazeera)
Sudan: five members of the security forces killed in a raid on an ISIL cell (Al Jazeera)

In Notice:

Andrew Fleming: Trudeau wins a minority with a majority in British Columbia
James Cohen: This government must work with other parties to end snow washing

The kicker:

Photo: @ Kyr0Nagib / Twitter

Michael Kovrig has been a very busy man since his return to Canadian soil. Since the weekend, he has had his hair cut, a COVID-19 vaccine, and urged others to do so as well. As the National Post reports, he also discovered he was a bit of a celebrity.

Good night.

More iPolitics


read more
International headquarters

Canadians, Chinese return home in prisoner exchange


China, the United States and Canada have concluded a high-stakes prisoner swap with happy homecoming for two Canadians detained by China and for an executive from Chinese global communications giant Huawei Technologies accused of fraud, potentially putting end to a three-year feud that involved all three of the countries.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hugged diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor on the tarmac after they touched down in Calgary early Saturday. The men were arrested in China in December 2018, shortly after Canada arrested Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies and daughter of the company founder, in connection with a US extradition request.

Many countries have called China’s action a “hostage policy,” while China has accused Ottawa of arbitrary detention. The two Canadians were jailed for over 1,000 days.

“It’s fantastic to be back in Canada and I’m extremely grateful to everyone who worked hard to bring us both home,” said the visibly slimmer Kovrig after a government plane Canadian landed in Toronto and was greeted by his wife and sister. .

“I feel fantastic,” Kovrig said.

Meng’s return to China later Saturday was broadcast live on state television, highlighting how Beijing has linked his case to Chinese nationalism and its rise as a global economic and political powerhouse.

Wearing a red dress to match the color of the Chinese flag, Meng thanked the ruling Communist Party and its leader, Xi Jinping, for supporting her for more than 1,000 days under house arrest in Vancouver, where she has two multi-million dollar mansions.

“I have finally returned to the warm embrace of the homeland,” Meng said. “As an ordinary Chinese citizen going through this difficult time, I have always felt the warmth and concern of the party, the nation and the people.”

The chain of events involving the world powers brought an abrupt end to the legal and geopolitical feuds that disrupted relations between Washington, Beijing and Ottawa. The three-way deal allowed China and Canada to each bring home their own detained citizens as the United States completed a criminal case against Meng who, for months, was mired in an extradition battle.

“These two men went through an incredibly difficult ordeal. Over the past 1,000 days they have shown strength, perseverance and grace and we are all inspired by them, ”Trudeau said of the two Canadians.

The first activity took place on Friday afternoon when Meng, 49, reached a deal with federal prosecutors calling for the fraud charges against her to be dropped next year and allowing her to return to China immediately. As part of the deal, known as the Deferred Prosecution Agreement, she accepted responsibility for distorting the company’s business relationship in Iran.

The deal came as President Biden and his Chinese counterpart Xi sought to ease signs of public tension – even as the world’s two dominant economies disagree on issues as diverse as cybersecurity, climate change, human rights and trade and tariffs. Biden said in a speech to the United Nations General Assembly earlier this week that he did not intend to start a “new cold war,” while Xi told world leaders that disputes between the countries “must be treated through dialogue and cooperation”.

“The US government joins the international community in welcoming the decision of the authorities of the People’s Republic of China to release Canadian citizens Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig after more than two and a half years in arbitrary detention. We are pleased that they are returning home to Canada, ”US Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken said in a statement.

As part of the deal with Meng, the Justice Department agreed to dismiss fraud charges against her in December 2022 – exactly four years after her arrest – on condition that she meets certain conditions, including not challenging any government factual allegations. The Justice Department also agreed to drop her request for Meng’s extradition to the United States, which she had vigorously contested.

After appearing by videoconference for her hearing in New York, Meng made a brief appearance in Vancouver court, where she was released on bail living in a multi-million dollar mansion while the two Canadians were held in cells. Chinese prison where the lights were on. 24 hours a day.

Outside the courtroom, Meng thanked the Canadian government for upholding the rule of law, expressed his gratitude to the Canadian people and apologized “for the inconvenience.”

“Over the past three years my life has been turned upside down,” she said. “It was a disruptive time for me as a mother, wife and business leader. But I believe every cloud has a silver lining. It was truly an invaluable experience in my life. I will never forget all the good wishes I received.

Soon after, Meng left on an Air China flight to Shenzhen, China, where Huawei’s headquarters are located.

Huawei is the world’s largest supplier of network equipment for telephone and Internet companies. It has been a symbol of China’s progress to become a global technological powerhouse – and a subject of US security and law enforcement concerns. Some analysts say Chinese companies have flouted international rules and standards and stolen the technology.

The case against Meng stems from a January 2019 indictment by the Trump administration’s Justice Department that accused Huawei of stealing trade secrets and using a Hong Kong shell company called Skycom to sell equipment to Iran in violation of US sanctions. The indictment also accused Meng herself of committing fraud by misleading HSBC bank about the company’s business dealings in Iran.

The indictment came amid a broader Trump administration crackdown on Huawei over concerns from the U.S. government that the company’s products could facilitate Chinese espionage. The administration cut off Huawei’s access to U.S. components and technology, including Google Music and other smartphone services, and subsequently banned vendors around the world from using U.S. technology to produce components for Huawei.

The Biden White House, meanwhile, has maintained a hard line on Huawei and other Chinese companies whose technology is believed to pose national security risks. Huawei has repeatedly denied claims by the US government and safety concerns with its products.

Former Canadian Ambassador to China Guy Saint-Jacques, the former boss of Kovrig, said he was delighted that the two Canadians were at home.

“Obviously, the Chinese were so eager to get Meng back that they dropped all claims that the two Michael’s had been arrested for good reason. They must recognize that their reputation has been seriously tarnished, ”said Saint-Jacques. “There are grunts within the Chinese Communist Party, people say, ‘Which way are we going, Xi Jinping? We are creating too many enemies. Why are we enemies of countries like Canada and Australia? “


read more
International headquarters

Youth-led climate events around the world: live updates


Jérôme Foster II. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Young climate activists marched in New York today to call for climate justice and end the burning of fossil fuels.

As the strikers made their way to the financial district of Lower Manhattan, halting traffic in New York City, the busy streets filled with chants such as “sea level is rising, so are we”, “Keep that carbon in the ground” and “There is nothing natural about natural gas.

The path followed the same route as the biggest climate strike of 2019 when Greta Thunberg made an appearance. Among the faces of the march to Battery Park, where the crowd heard speakers and musicians, were prominent young activists such as Alexandria Villaseñor, Jerome Foster II and Jamie Margolin.

Alexandria Villaseñor, on the right.
Alexandria Villaseñor, on the right. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Villanseñor told CNN her goals have evolved since she started going on strike at 13.

“The movement has really changed over the past year,” she said. “The climate crisis continues to become more and more urgent. In the latest UN climate report released in August, the language changed to be more urgent, saying that we are already affected and now we just need to mitigate. It was prevention before, but now we have to mitigate.

Foster, currently the youngest member of the White House Advisory Council on Environmental Justice, told CNN he wore red to represent the findings of the landmark UN State of the Science on Climate Change report, which has been called a “code red for humanity.”

“Our requirements have changed. We are no longer just children who are on the streets, we are now in a position of authority, ”he said. “Now we are taken seriously, we have a seat at the table, we are going to make sure everyone at this table understands the pressing urgency and takes action.”

Jamie Margolin.
Jamie Margolin. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Margolin, co-founder of the Zero Hour climate organization which joined the movement in 2016, also wore red to represent a world on fire. She grew up in the Pacific Northwest, which experienced a record-breaking heat wave this summer that scientists say would have been “virtually impossible” without man-made climate change.

“It’s been such a long journey, and it’s really overwhelming in a good way to see such joy and resilience right now because it’s been such a dark time for so long,” she said. told CNN. “Online activism just isn’t the same, especially with so many climate disasters happening.”


read more
Canadian army

Reuters Global News Summary | Politics


Here is a summary of the news in the world.

Taiwan threatens to take China to WTO in new fruit dispute

Taiwan on Sunday threatened to bring China to the World Trade Organization after Beijing said it would suspend imports of sugar apples and wax apples from the island due to pest concerns, during the last quarrel between the two over the fruit. Relations between Taipei and Beijing, which claim democratically ruled Taiwan as its own territory, are at their lowest in decades, with China increasing political and military pressure for the island to accept its sovereignty.

Explanation – The Canadian Federal Election: What Happened and What Are the Stakes

Canadians go to the polls on Monday in an election that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called two years earlier, seeking to turn public approval for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic into a new four-year term . WHY NOW?

Stored COVID vaccines must be handed over to poorest countries, says former UK prime minister

A vaccine summit hosted by US President Joe Biden this week is expected to come up with a plan to transfer 100 million stored COVID-19 vaccines to poorer countries before they reach their expiration date, said the former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Biden is due to convene a virtual COVID-19 summit on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly on Wednesday, aimed at boosting vaccinations around the world with the aim of ending the pandemic by the end of 2022.

World leaders return to UN with focus on pandemic and climate

World leaders return to the United Nations in New York this week with a focus on stepping up efforts to tackle both climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced them last year to send video statements for the annual gathering. As the coronavirus still rages amid an unfair vaccine rollout, about a third of the 193 UN states plan to send videos again, but presidents, prime ministers and foreign ministers of others are expected get to the United States.

Canadian Trudeau hammers his rival on COVID-19 position on the last day of the campaign

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, crisscrossing the country to deliver a final speech to voters ahead of Monday’s election, said on Sunday that only his Liberals can end the COVID-19 pandemic and accused his main rival of adopting the wrong approach. Opinion polls indicate that the political advantage is with Trudeau, who is stepping up attacks on Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole over the pandemic. Trudeau supports vaccination mandates against O’Toole, who prefers testing to control the public health crisis.

Russia’s ruling pro-Putin party wins majority after crackdown but loses ground

Russia’s ruling party United Russia, which backs President Vladimir Putin, has retained its majority in parliament after three days of elections and a widespread crackdown on critics, despite losing about a fifth of its support, have showed partial results Monday. With 33% of the ballots counted, the Central Election Commission said United Russia won just over 45% of the vote, with its closest rival the Communist Party at around 22%.

Australia defends cancellation of French submarine deal, Macron and Biden discuss

Australia defended on Sunday its decision to drop a multibillion-dollar order for French submarines and opt instead for an alternative deal with the United States and Britain, saying it had signaled its concerns in Paris months ago. Canberra’s move angered Paris, sparking an unprecedented diplomatic crisis that analysts say could cause lasting damage to US alliances with France and Europe. It has also annoyed China, the main rising power in the Indo-Pacific region.

Netanyahu suggests on Facebook that Biden fell asleep upon meeting new Israeli PM

Former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggested in a video posted to Facebook on Sunday that US President Joe Biden fell asleep when he met with new Israeli leader Naftali Bennett last month. A Reuters fact check https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-biden-asleep-idUSL1N2Q00H8 previously debunked the idea that Biden dozed off, after social media users shared a video clip of the US President who they said showed him looking down and falling asleep while Bennett spoke in the Oval Office.

Syrian military leader pays rare visit to Jordan to discuss border security

The Syrian Defense Minister visited Jordan on Sunday to discuss stability at their mutual border, the first such meeting since the Syrian conflict erupted ten years ago when the two neighbors backed opposing factions , officials said. The meeting follows a major military offensive to retake the last rebel stronghold in southern Syria, and after reestablishing control this month over Daraa, a town south of Damascus, as part of a deal brokered by Russia that prevented a full Iranian-led military assault. army units.

France cancels defense meeting with UK over submarine dispute, sources say

France canceled a meeting between Armies Minister Florence Parly and her British counterpart scheduled for this week after Australia canceled a submarine order with Paris in favor of a deal with Washington and London, two sources said. close to the file. Parly personally made the decision to drop the bilateral meeting with British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace, the sources said.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


read more
International headquarters

As leaders meet again at UN, climate and COVID tops list


The UN chief keeps repeating that the world is at “a pivotal moment” and must shift into high gear towards “a greener and safer world”. To do this, leaders must give multilateralism ‘teeth’, starting with joint action to reverse the global failure to fight COVID-19 in 2020 and ensure that 70% of the world’s population is vaccinated. during the first half of 2022.

But as is often the case with the United Nations, it remains to be seen whether the high-level meetings, which start on Monday and end on September 27, actually make progress.

After COVID-19 forced leaders to deliver pre-recorded speeches remotely at last year’s meeting, more than 100 heads of state and government and more than two dozen ministers decided to come to New York this year despite the pandemic. This reflects the unique role of the United Nations as a global public forum for the 193 member countries, whether small or large, weak or powerful.

The annual gathering of assembly world leaders – called the General Debate – has always been a place where presidents, prime ministers, monarchs and other senior officials can discuss local, regional and global concerns in public meetings and functions or private, and during lunches and dinners. . In other words, it creates a space for carrying out the delicate business of face-to-face diplomacy, which is seen as much more productive than online virtual meetings.

Richard Gowan, director of the International Crisis Group at the UN, said the first in-person meeting of the General Assembly since the start of the pandemic – although some 60 leaders have chosen to give pre-recorded speeches – is not only symbolic but an opportunity to “show that the international cooperation is important.”

“For the leaders of the poorest countries, this is also a rare opportunity to speak publicly about the ongoing aftershocks of COVID-19,” he said. “It’s also, frankly, quite fun coming to New York. Many of these leaders are stuck in their capitals.

After four years of Donald Trump representing the United States in meetings, this week Joe Biden will make his first appearance as president when the general debate opens on Tuesday. Gowan said that “the really important question is exactly how he frames relations with China.”

“He won’t be criticizing China as openly as Trump, especially in 2019 and 2020,” Gowan said. “But I think Biden will try to portray China as a country that challenges the rules-based world order and a country that should not be trusted to lead the international system.”

The pandemic is not only something world leaders need to discuss, but also something to deal with on the ground: a key issue ahead of the meetings has been COVID-19 entry requirements for leaders in states – United – and at the UN headquarters itself.

Traditionally, the first speaker after the Secretary General presents his State of the World Report is Brazil. Its president, Jair Bolsonaro, who is not vaccinated, reiterated Thursday that he does not plan to be vaccinated anytime soon. Bolsonaro’s rationale: He had COVID-19 and therefore, he says, he has a high level of antibodies.

Entry into the United States requires a vaccination or recent COVID-19 test, but New York City has a vaccination requirement for convention centers, and it considers the General Assembly Hall – which does not. is technically not American soil – is part of it.

Assembly Speaker Abdulla Shahid said in a letter Thursday that the UN relies only on an honor system. This means that there will be no New York City police to screen people entering the UN headquarters.

Many diplomats say they will keep a close watch on the last scheduled speakers on the last day, September 27, because each has something controversial.

North Korea has just tested new cruise missiles that could deliver nuclear weapons. In Myanmar, generals toppled the democratically elected government in February. The Guinean army overthrew the democratically elected president a month ago. And in Afghanistan, the Taliban seized power on August 15 when the Afghan army did not fight as the last American troops withdrew from the country after 20 years of war.

The credentials of Myanmar’s current ambassador, the country’s ousted democratic government, are challenged by the military junta, but UN officials say the General Assembly’s credentials committee will not meet to hear the protest only after the end of the week’s meetings. And the Taliban have yet to submit a letter challenging the credentials of the previous government’s ambassador.

Among those delivering pre-recorded statements this year are the presidents of Iran, Egypt, Indonesia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. French President Emmanuel Macron was supposed to deliver a pre-recorded statement, but the government has said Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian will now deliver the country’s speech in person on the last day.

France and China have reacted angrily to the surprise announcement by Biden, alongside Australian and British leaders, of an agreement to supply Australia with at least eight nuclear-powered submarines. Australia had signed a contract of at least $ 66 billion for a dozen French conventional diesel-electric submarines and their construction was already underway.

France, the United States’ longest-serving ally, responded by recalling its ambassadors from the United States and Australia on Friday, and the implications of the dispute for Asian and global security will certainly be hot topics in private meetings this week. .

The action begins Monday morning when the Secretary-General brings together world leaders and global pop group BTS to highlight the 17 UN goals for 2030 ranging from eradicating poverty and protecting the planet to achievement. of gender equality, providing every child with a quality education and ensuring a healthy life for all.

An hour later, around 40 world leaders will take part in a closed-door meeting on climate change co-chaired by Guterres and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the run-up to November’s big climate event in Glasgow, Scotland.

“We need urgent progress on money, cars, coal and trees,” British Ambassador to the UN Barbara Woodward said. This means raising $ 100 billion to help vulnerable countries cope with climate change and get countries ambitious emission reduction plans, she said.

Louis Charbonneau, UN director for Human Rights Watch, said world leaders must also deal with human rights crises.

“They must be clear that there can be no status quo with perpetrators of serious rights violations and support UN action which will impose real costs,” he said. “Violent leaders around the world need to know that the world is watching them and that they could one day be held responsible for serious violations. “


read more
History organization

For Latinx Heritage Month, Celebrate Our “Achievements and Moments of Joy”


Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion Dania Matos sent the following message to the campus community on Friday:

Each year we celebrate National Latinx Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15. The past twelve months have been particularly difficult for many Latinx communities, but there have also been wonderful accomplishments and times of joy.

Dania Matos is the new Equity and Inclusion Manager at UC Berkeley. (Photo courtesy of Dania Matos)

For those I haven’t met yet, I’m Dania Matos, the new Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion. I recently came from UC Merced where I was the first Associate Chancellor and Director of Diversity. I have a background in law, racial justice and intersectionality and look forward to working with you to increase inclusion, belonging and justice on our campus.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate effect on Latinx communities across the country, resulting in greater impacts on our health, finances, and well-being. In fact, a recent survey by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies, led by co-directors G. Cristina Mora and Eric Schickler, found that people in Latin American and Native American communities were less confident about their finances and of their health problems than other groups. And our UC alumnus and faculty member Dr David Hayes-Bautista recently released a report with UCLA’s Center for the Study of Latin American Health and Culture that explores the number of Disproportionate deaths for communities of color, especially for the elderly in Pacific Island communities and Latinx.

The strength of Latinx communities is demonstrated from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, to student activism on campus. UC Berkeley students have a long history of organizing space on campus: from the creation of the César E. Chávez Student Center to the creation of the Multicultural Community Center in the Martin Luther King Jr. building. continues and students have worked hard to establish a new Latinx Student Resource Center (LSRC) which will open in early 2022. The “phase 1” space of the LSRC will be located at Hearst Gym and will be managed by the office Development Center for Chicanx / Latinx Students. , directed by director Lupe Gallegos-Diaz. Students will co-create programs and create a familia y comunidad that increases their sense of belonging to UC Berkeley.

UC Berkeley is committed to becoming an Institution Serving Hispanics (HSI) by 2027. The HSI Initiative is UC Berkeley’s plan to increase the number of Latinx students and create sentiment membership where Chicanx / Latinx students can flourish academically, personally and professionally. Campus speakers, led by Co-Chairs Dr Oscar Dubón and Dr Kris Gutierrez, completed the HSI Working Group Preliminary Report in Spring 2021. The university is delighted to announce that our new Fall 2021 class is again exceptionally diverse and brings us closer to our HSI goals. The university increased the number of admitted students from underrepresented communities in higher education, including Chicanx / Latinx students, by almost 7% from fall 2020. We welcomed our newcomers. students with the shared book for new freshmen and transfer students, The Undocumented Americans, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio. The author gave a talk at Golden Bear Orientation last month and more book programming is planned for this fall.

Increasing the number of Latinx professors at Berkeley is also an institutional priority and will be a key component in becoming an HSI. The university has adopted the strategy of “recruiting faculty clusters” as a means of creating intellectual communities and diversifying the faculty. The Latinx Communities and Democracy cluster will begin the recruitment process this academic year 2021-22.

Research by and on Latinx communities continues to thrive in Cal. The Latinx Research Center continued to host important programs throughout the pandemic year, including “Decolonizing Epistemologies: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers” and a new podcast by poet Alán Pelaez Lopez titled “What’s In a Name? Where they explore the term “Latinx”. The Latinxs and Environment Initiative provides students with research opportunities focused on issues of climate change and environmental justice. Representatives recently attended the Second Annual Agriculture and Technology Conference in Stockton, Calif., Hosted by the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water, led by Cal’s former student Esperanza Vielma.

We are delighted to announce that we have ten UC Berkeley Award winners who have received the Northern California Chicana Latina Foundation Fellowship. The organization’s mission is to empower Chicanas and Latinas through personal, educational and professional advancement.

To help commemorate the important role that the students, faculty, and staff of Chicanx and Latinx have played on this campus, the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Chicanx Latinx Student Development Center, and the premier learning program cycle have teamed up to launch the Legacy Timeline project. This project researches and documents the role and history of the Chicanx and Latinx community on the UC Berkeley campus. For more information, please contact Lillian Castillo Speed ​​or Lupe Gallegos-Diaz.

Please join me in welcoming the California Alumni Association (CAA) to its new president, Alfonso Salazar. Alfonso is a UC Berkeley ’90 alumnus who was a student activist in organizations such as MEChA and United Students of Color. He is committed to working with student leaders and continuing to diversify the leadership of CAA. To continue building a pipeline of Latinx leaders across the system, the Chicanx Latinx Advisory Board will host the Chicanx Latinx Leadership Summit on Monday, September 20. Chancellor Juan Sánchez Muñoz of UC Merced will introduce President Drake, who will speak with Moderator Stephanie Reyes-Tuccio, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Educational Partnerships at UC Irvine.

UC Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association, the new collective organization for UC’s ten campuses, was recently recognized by UC President Michael V. Drake, MD, as the “first” group of alumni. system-wide in over 150 years of UC history! The group’s mission is to advocate and represent the collective interests of Latinx alumni on UC’s ten campuses to the Office of the President of the University of California. And our current UCB Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association (UCB CLAA) is gearing up for its Homecoming event on October 2, which will feature a speaker, scholarship ceremony, and alumni class reunions.

Alumni are also kicking off the Legacy 2022 event which will feature three days of alumni celebrations, networking and campus engagement.

We invite you to learn more about Latinx Heritage Month here at UC Berkeley and to read, listen, learn, participate and engage with the many communities and activities highlighted this month.


read more
Canadian army

Evening update: pandemic dominates federal campaign after Jason Kenney’s overthrow in Alberta


Have a good evening, let’s start with today’s best stories:

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau calls the COVID-19 situation in Alberta “heartbreaking” and says Ottawa will send ventilators to the province. Meanwhile, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole wouldn’t say if he still supports Prime Minister Jason Kenney’s response to the pandemic.

The federal campaign has been disrupted by Kenney’s decision this week to declare a state of public health emergency and introduce a vaccine passport system in the province. Trudeau on Thursday criticized O’Toole’s previous support for the premier of Alberta. In turn, Mr. O’Toole sued Mr. Trudeau for calling an election amid a pandemic, and said the $ 600 million spent on the campaign could have been sent to the provinces to fight the Delta variant. highly contagious instead. .

The story continues under the ad

“The fans are on. Anything more we can do, be it sending more health professionals like we did to Ontario a few months ago when they were overwhelmed. We’re going to make sure Albertans get the support of everyone in this country in the way they need to get through this time. “

Alberta Health Services said on Wednesday the agency will ask other provinces if they can take care of patients in Alberta’s intensive care units, as well as if they can send frontline staff.

Related:

  • Federal campaigns must do everything to get supporters to the polls
  • Saskatchewan to Require Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination to Try to Increase Adoption

This is the daily evening update bulletin. If you’re reading this on the web, or if it was sent to you as a transfer, you can sign up for Evening Update and over 20 other Globe newsletters. here. If you like what you see, share it with your friends.

Chinese PLA general collaborates with licensed scientist at Canada’s top infectious disease lab

A high-ranking People’s Liberation Army officer collaborated on Ebola research with one of the scientists who was later fired from the Canadian High Security Infectious Disease Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Research by Major-General Chen Wei and former Canadian government laboratory scientist Xiangguo Qiu indicates that cooperation between the Chinese military and scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory has gone much further than previously thought. previously. major-general. Chen Wei was recently praised by President Xi Jinping for developing a Chinese vaccine against COVID-19,

The story continues under the ad

major-general. Chen Wei and Dr Qiu, who until recently headed the vaccine and antiviral therapy development section at the Winnipeg lab, collaborated on two scientific papers on Ebola, in 2016 and 2020. These papers did not identify the major-general. Chen as a high-ranking officer in the military wing of the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Instead, she is identified as Wei Chen, who holds a PhD and works at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

Common? SpikeVax? Health Canada Authorizes Rebranding for Approved COVID-19 Vaccines

Health Canada has approved new names for the Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will now carry the brand name Comirnaty, which the company says represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community and immunity. The Moderna vaccine will go through SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be called Vaxzevria.

Manufacturers said the changes followed full approval of the vaccines by Health Canada on Thursday. During the interim order, which expired Thursday, the vaccines did not carry their brand names.

Read more:

  • NHL says it expects 98% of players to be fully vaccinated before the start of the season
  • France suspends around 3,000 health workers for failing to comply with COVID-19 vaccine mandate

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

The story continues under the ad

Ontario is requiring universities and colleges to update their policies on sexual assault: The province says policies need to better support students who file complaints. The guidelines were released amid calls from University of Western Ontario students to tackle the threat of sexual violence on campus after allegations that young women were drugged and sexually assaulted in residence last week.

The world risks missing its climate targets despite the pandemic pause in emissions, according to the UN: The economic slowdown linked to the virus caused only a temporary drop in CO2 emissions last year and that was not enough to reverse the rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, said the ‘World Meteorological Organization, adding that there is a growing likelihood that the world will miss its Paris The deal aims to reduce global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

Suncor is partnering with eight Indigenous communities to purchase TC Energy’s remaining interest in Northern Courier Pipeline: Suncor, three First Nations communities and five Métis communities will own a 15% interest in this approximately $ 1.3 billion pipeline asset. The partnership is expected to generate roughly $ 16 million per year in gross revenue for its partners and provide reliable revenue, Suncor said in a statement.

The Maple Leafs and Sabers will play an outdoor game in Hamilton on March 13: Buffalo is listed as the home team against the Maple Leafs in the NHL Heritage Classic, which will be played at Tim Hortons Field. Buffalo becomes the first US-based team to compete in what will be the sixth Heritage Classic.

WAKE-UP

A drop in commodities depressed the major Canadian stock index a day before heightened volatility associated with the quarterly expiration of options known as quadruple witching.

The story continues under the ad

The S & P / TSX Composite Index closed 91.69 points lower at 20,602.10.

In New York, the Dow Jones Industrial Index lost 63.07 points to 34,751.32. The S&P 500 Index lost 6.95 points to 4,473.75, while the Nasdaq composite was up 20.39 points to 15,181.92.

The Canadian dollar was trading at 78.90 US cents against 79.05 US cents on Wednesday.

Got a topical tip you’d like us to review? Write to us at [email protected]. Need to share documents securely? Contact us via SecureDrop.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Climate change puts Canada’s seniors at risk

The story continues under the ad

“If you think the pandemic has been incredibly difficult, remember that the World Health Organization and The Lancet have both declared climate change to be the number one health threat of this century. And just as we’ve seen with COVID-19, climate change won’t affect all Canadians equally. “- Amit Arya and Samantha Green

Canada’s gun violence epidemic is unlike what you might think

“Instead of just hearing an audio clip of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s opinion on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s semi-automatic rifle ban, it would have been nice to hear it as well, as well as other leaders, discuss the details of Bill C-21. Gun owners and community leaders have voiced opposition to the legislation, which contains many provisions that are not rooted in evidence-based science. “- Jooyoung lee

Low-income Canadian households will suffer the most from surging inflation

“If we truly appreciate the essential services that our workers provide to our economy, we should also appreciate the increase in their wages. Higher wages will cushion the impact of inflation on low-income Canadians, encourage more of these workers to re-enter the workforce, and alleviate labor shortages in businesses. – Sohaib Shahid

LIVE BETTER

The story continues under the ad

Five shows to see across Canada (and five to watch online) as theater returns to normal

Globe Theater columnist J. Kelly Nestruck says it has never been clearer than this month that theater is a local art form. As such, Canadian cities are in very different return states.

In Montreal, for example, the performing arts have almost returned to a pre-pandemic level of activity. In Toronto, on the other hand, many large theater companies wait until winter or even spring to resume in-person performances indoors.

Nestruck is taking a look at some in-person shows to look forward to this fall, but also has a few alternatives online.

LONG READING OF THE DAY

Ocean Cleanup struggles to deliver on pledge to eliminate plastic from the Pacific

An offshore supply vessel used by the nonprofit Ocean Cleanup to remove plastic from the ocean is docked in a port in Victoria on September 8, 2021.

GLORIA DICKIE / Reuters

Ocean Cleanup, a non-profit organization launched in 2013 and funded by cash donations and support from companies such as Coca-Cola, had hopes of ridding the world’s oceans of 90% of floating plastic by here. 2040. The meager transport shows how difficult the task will be.

The group’s best-case scenario allows it to remove 20,000 tonnes per year from the North Pacific, a small fraction of the roughly 11 million tonnes of plastic dumped into the oceans each year. And that amount entering the ocean is expected to nearly triple to 29 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

During a month’s 120-hour trip, Ocean Cleanup collected 8.2 tonnes of plastic – less than the standard haul of a garbage truck.

“I think they came from a good place to want to help the ocean, but by far the best way to help the ocean is to prevent plastic from getting into the ocean in the first place,” said Miriam Goldstein, Director of the Ocean. politics at the Center for American Progress think tank.

Read the full story here.

The evening update is presented by Rob Gilroy. If you wish to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go to here register. If you have any comments, drop us a line. Remark.


read more
History organization

The relationship between race and well-being has never been so pressing | At the Smithsonian


This summer, Simone Biles, widely regarded as the greatest female gymnast of all time, shocked the sports world by retiring from the majority of her events at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Citing her struggles with “twisties,” a mental block that makes gravity-defying gymnastics movements incredibly dangerous, the 24-year-old has received widespread praise for putting his health first.

Biles later said she took inspiration from Naomi Osaka, the 23-year-old tennis star who retired from Roland Garros and Wimbledon in order to prioritize her mental health. The two women, both black athletes at the peak of their sport, are part of a growing wave of black individuals “publicly [taking] their sanity in their hands in a way never seen before in elite sports, ”as NBC News reported.

Lonnie Bunch, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, says the example set by Biles, Osaka and others has brought the issue of “mental health through the lens of race” to the fore. This topic, along with the broader relationship between race and well-being, looks particularly timely in 2021, as the United States continues to contend with systemic racism and a pandemic that disproportionately affects people of color.

“Part of the fight for equity in America is the fight for equitable health care and access to mental health care,” Bunch said.

Race, welfare and wealth will feature prominently in an upcoming forum hosted by the Smithsonian’s Our Shared Future: Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative. Scheduled for Thursday, August 26 at 7 p.m. EST, the virtually broadcast summit will put Smithsonian academics in conversation with authors, experts and activists. Planned programming includes sessions on the history and impact of race, the link between health and wealth, the role of race in mental health and trauma, and local organizations striving to reinvent a better future.

The Smithsonian announced its Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative last summer, following the murder of George Floyd and the outbreak of widespread protests against police brutality. Funded with a $ 25 million donation from Bank of America, the goal of the campaign is to “confront race and highlight racism and social justice from a historical perspective,” Ariana said. Curtis, director of content for the initiative. Reckoning With Our Racial Past also seeks to emphasize the relevance of its topic today and to offer ideas on how to move forward as a nation.

The Smithsonian announced the initiative last June, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder and widespread protests against systemic racism.

(Photo by Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images)

In addition to virtual and live events, the multi-year initiative will include town halls, digital resources, educational tools, immersive pop-up experiences, storytelling projects, fundraising efforts and more. This week’s event will be the first of three national forums.

“When I became a secretary [in 2019], what was important for me was to recognize that the Smithsonian had a contemporary resonance, that it had an opportunity, really a responsibility, to have value, to say basically: we are going to help the public by giving him tools to grapple with everyday life, from the challenge of climate change to race issues, ”says Bunch.

He adds: “When a nation is in crisis, its institutions must be strengthened. And clearly, this country is in crisis.

The Smithsonian’s collections and researchers represent a wealth of expertise, and its status as a beloved 175-year-old American institution means it is uniquely positioned to bring together people of different backgrounds and experiences.

“Our network includes other museums and cultural centers in the United States of varying sizes and missions, as well as community organizations, academics and activists,” says Curtis. “We are certainly not assuming that the Smithsonian is the first organization to think about these [questions of race,] but thinking of the power we have as a trusted institution to bring these [issues] to a larger and larger audience is really important.

The secretary envisioned the project as a way for the Smithsonian to “do what we do best”: namely, to make complicated subjects accessible to the public, provide a historical and cultural context that illuminates the present, and forge links between people who could not otherwise interact. . With the funded initiative, the Smithsonian could shed “some light” on a moment “fraught with misinformation, hatred and partisanship.”

The team responsible for developing the initiative focused its efforts on six thematic pillars: running and well-being; race and wealth; race and location; race, politics and ethics; race beyond the United States; and race, arts and aesthetics. All of these topics tie in with ongoing Institution-wide work of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s Care Package, an online exhibit of creative offerings released at the height of the pandemic, when the crimes of Anti-Asian hatred was in the news across the nation — on the NMAAHC’s Talking About Race portal.

“The term ‘systemic racism’ can seem unwieldy and overwhelming,” explains Curtis, “and so we wanted to think about how to make it knowable? How to make it understandable? How do you make it feel changeable? “

She adds that she wants the forums to give the public a sense of optimism: “We want people to think about a way forward. “

Covid-19 test

The Covid-19 pandemic has taken a disproportionate toll on people of color.

(Governor Tom Wolf via Flickr under CC BY 2.0)

The ongoing pandemic influenced the decision of the organizers to center the initiative’s first forum on race, welfare and wealth. But this week’s event doesn’t just focus on Covid-19. One session will discuss the development of race as a social construct and the lingering consequences of unsubstantiated claims that race is based on biological differences. “[This is] a time when people are trying to go beyond race as an identity and really want to question how race works, what race means, what role race and racism have in our lives today ”, Curtis explains.

Joi Lewis, founder of the Healing Justice Foundation; Monique Morris, President and CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color; and Diana Chao, Founder and Executive Director of Letters to Strangers, will lead a separate discussion on mental health and trauma, a topic explicitly linked to public statements made by Biles, Osaka and other black athletes.

“This particular conversation is intergenerational,” Curtis explains. “Younger generations of black women speak openly about their mental health in ways that would not have seemed acceptable or permitted to previous generations. Opening this conversation in public spaces is really important.

To ensure the initiative reaches a large part of the country, the Smithsonian is working with local partners, including cultural organizations, historically black colleges and universities, sports teams, and nonprofits. These groups will help organize pop-up events in cities across the United States, addressing issues through a local lens in recognition of the fact “that the race takes place differently in different places,” according to Bunch.

“It’s less about the Smithsonian saying we have the answers, and more about the Smithsonian as a facilitator,” he adds. “What I hope it will become [is] a driver of possibility, a driver of collaboration that… the Smithsonian can continue to do long after I’m no longer a secretary.

For Bunch, the initiative represents “an opportunity for the Smithsonian to demonstrate that it has value, not only as a place that looks back, but as a place that looks to the future.” He hopes this “will help a nation recognize that it has a common future even though race issues have always divided us.”

The initiative’s first forum, on the theme of race, well-being and wealth, will be held virtually on August 26 at 7 p.m. EST. Join Secretary Bunch and a panel of esteemed experts at oursharedfuture.si.edu.


read more
History organization

Maine Gardener: Why Maine Audubon added non-native plants to its sale


When I read on the Maine Audubon Society website that the organization had started selling non-Maine plants, I was surprised.

I was sure the environment mainstay hadn’t given up on its commitment to the plants that Maine’s birds, insects, and other species need to survive. But I wondered what caused the change.

The added non-natives are good plants. One of them, Liatris scariosa or the northern flaming star, is native to York County but not the rest of the state, by the standards used by Audubon. Audubon had therefore previously excluded him from the sale of plants.

Eric Topper, explaining the change, said some birds, insects and other animals, as well as some plants, have extended their historical range, mainly north and east as the climate has warmed. So why wouldn’t Audubon sell plants whose historical range is somewhat south and west of Maine.

The change was not an instant decision.

“Since we’ve been in the world of native plant restoration six or seven years now, we’ve struggled to define our definition of native plants,” Topper said in a telephone interview.

When sales began, Maine Audubon opted for the list, also used by state officials, called BONAP, the Biota of North America program, which has long studied native plants. Audubon also consulted with state officials, and if the state thought a factory shouldn’t be on the list, it was removed, Topper said.

As a result, the list of native Maine Audubon plants for sale (mainenativeplants.org) was among the most restrictive of the native Maine listings.

Over the years, with real life experience, those in charge have started to question boundaries. Audubon staff have noticed how much hummingbirds love Monarda didyma, with the common names scarlet bee balm or red bergamot.

While working in greenhouses to water the plants, bumblebees (which are native) cover and worship Liatris spicata.

So, Audubon added these plants, which are not strictly native according to the definition she chose to use, because of their enormous benefits to birds and other wildlife that Maine Audubon’s mission is to protect.

Topper said his organization did not make the decision without outside help. He received help from Dan Jaffe, now a horticulturist at the Norcross Wildlife Foundation in Massachusetts, who co-authored the book “Native Plants for New England Gardens” while with the Native Plant Trust.

In addition to Liatris spicata, Monarda didyma, and Liatris scariosa, other non-native plants added to Audubon are Echinacea purpurea or purple coneflower, and Coreopsis lanceolata or lanceleaf coreopsis – both native to the northeastern United States but not Maine.

Buyers seem to have agreed with Audubon’s choice. Scarlet Bee Balm, Spearleaf Coreopsis, and Purple Echinacea are already sold out for this year.

Topper encourages people to research these species – not cultivars of those species, which would have a brand name with single quotes at the end – at local nurseries, and plant them.

I asked Topper if selling plants that might not be strictly native to Maine amounted to assisted migration. There has been some concern, which I spoke about in 2018, that plants might go extinct because their natural habitats are getting too hot for them to live. And these plants cannot naturally migrate as fast as climate change moves their ideal climate further north.

Topper said the sales could help with the migration, but that was not the group’s intention. He thinks the species got to Maine anyway, because people love them and planted them in their gardens.

One thing Topper said towards the end of our interview surprised me. Despite Maine Audubon’s emphasis on native species, he realizes that non-natives also have a great advantage in wildlife. He had just spent a week in the heart of nature, places where the forest has taken over from abandoned farms. Apple trees – native to Kazakhstan – in these woods still thrive and are a huge boon to wildlife, he said, giving just one example.

By the way, the Maine Audubon plant sale has gone well this year, and although three of the new introductions have sold out, there are still many good native plants in stock.

And he says, and I agree, that September and early October are great times to plant shrubs and perennials in Maine. Plus, buying them will help Audubon staff.

“We don’t want to take care of these plants in the winter,” he said.

Tom Atwell is a freelance writer who gardens in Cape Elizabeth. He can be contacted at: [email protected]

Use the form below to reset your password. When you submit your account email, we’ll send you an email with a reset code.


read more
International headquarters

Forest fires ravage Greece’s forests and cut the big island in two


GOUVES, Greece (AP) – Columns of smoke and ash blocked the sun over Greece’s second largest island and turned the skies orange as a days-old wildfire devoured pristine forests and triggered more evacuation alerts on Sunday, as residents called for additional firefighting. to help.

The fire in Evia, an island of mountains and forested canyons dotted with small coves of crystal clear water, began on August 3 and swept through the popular summer destination from coast to coast, burning uncontrollably for five days. Dozens of homes and businesses have been destroyed and thousands of residents and vacationers have been evacuated.

The fire is currently the most serious of dozens to erupt in Greece following the country’s most prolonged and intense heat wave in three decades, which has raised temperatures to 45 degrees Celsius (113 F) and created conditions of bone dryness.

The Greek Coast Guard said that three patrol boats, four navy ships, a ferry, two tourist boats and numerous fishing and private boats were ready to carry out further potential evacuations from the seaside village of Pefki, in the northern tip of Evia.

About 350 people have already boarded the ferry, the coast guard said, as towering flames cut many evacuation routes from the roads. Evacuation orders were issued for four villages, including Pefki, but some residents refused to leave, hoping to save their properties.

Planes and helicopters dropped water on the flames from above.

“It is already too late, the area has been destroyed,” lamented Giannis Kontzias, mayor of the municipality of Istiaia, north of Evia, on the Greek television channel Open TV. Residents of neighboring villages were urged to travel to Istiatia, a town of 7,000 in northern Evia that firefighters struggled to save overnight.

Villagers and residents of North Evia’s main port, Aidipsos, were urged to close windows, doors and fireplaces to prevent embers from entering homes.

Civil protection chief NIkos Hardalias said conditions in Evia were particularly difficult for planes and helicopters dropping water. Their pilots were facing “great danger” with limited visibility, air turbulence and wind currents from the fire, he said.

“We have a tougher afternoon ahead of us, a tougher night,” said Hardalias. “All the forces that have fought an uphill battle all these days will continue to operate with relentless intensity, with the same selflessness. “

Overnight, coast guards and ferries evacuated 83 people from the beaches of northern Evia. On Friday evening, ferries evacuated more than 1,000 people from beaches and a seaside village in doomsday scenes as flames raged on the hills behind them.

Local officials and residents of northern Evia called for television news broadcasts on Saturday, calling for more firefighters and planes to drop water.

Firefighters said 575 firefighters with 35 ground crews and 89 vehicles were battling the Evia blaze, including 112 Romanian firefighters and 100 Ukrainian firefighters sent to Greece as reinforcements. Four helicopters and three planes, including a huge Beriev-200 leased from Russia, provided air support.

Three other major fires also burned on Sunday in Greece’s southern Peloponnese region, while a massive blaze that ravaged forests, homes and businesses on the northern outskirts of the Greek capital appeared to be in decline. This fire traversed large swathes of a national park on Mount Parnitha, the largest remaining forested area near Athens which still bore deep scars from a fire in 2007.

The reactivation of the blaze north of Athens was a constant concern, Hardalias said, adding that firefighters and the military had patrolled through the night to deal with the situation. A firefighter was transferred to hospital on Sunday after losing consciousness while on patrol, Hardalias said. His condition was not life threatening.

A volunteer firefighter died on Friday from head injuries caused by a fall from a utility pole north of Athens, while at least 20 people were treated for fire-related injuries, including two firefighters who were hospitalized in intensive care.

The causes of the fires are under investigation. Three people were arrested on Friday _ in the greater Athens region, central and southern Greece _ on suspicion of starting fires, in two cases intentionally.

Another person, a 47-year-old Greek, was arrested on Saturday afternoon in the Athenian suburb of Petroupoli for lighting two fires in a grove and setting four dumpsters on fire, police said.

Ten countries have already sent firefighting personnel and equipment such as planes to Greece, while eight others are sending additional reinforcements.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis visited the firefighters’ headquarters in Athens on Saturday and expressed “deep sorrow” for the death of the volunteer firefighter. He then went to the airport from where the firefighting planes take off and thanked the pilots, Greek and French.

Ensuring aid to all those affected by the forest fires will be “my first political priority,” the prime minister said, promising that all burnt areas would be reforested.

“When this nightmarish summer is over, we will turn our full attention to repairing the damage as quickly as possible and restoring our natural environment,” Mitsotakis said.

Greek and European officials have blamed climate change for the large number of fires that have ravaged southern Europe in recent days, from Italy to the Balkans, Greece and Turkey.

Massive fires have also been burning in Siberia in northern Russia for weeks, forcing the evacuation of a dozen villages on Saturday. In total, forest fires have burned nearly 15 million acres this year in Russia.

In the United States, hot, dry and gusty weather also fueled devastating wildfires in California.

About the photo: People use a ferry to evacuate the village of Pefki on the island of Evia, about 189 kilometers (118 miles) north of Athens, Greece on Sunday, August 8, 2021. Columns smoke and ash block sun above Greece’s second-largest island as days-old wildfire is devouring pristine forests and triggering more evacuation alerts. (AP Photo / Petros Karadjias)

Copyright 2021 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


read more
Canadian army

Military will likely need more help with natural disaster response, DND says


With wildfires and flooding raging across the country this summer, hundreds of members of the Canadian Armed Forces have been called in to help with provincial emergencies – but they will likely need help to keep it going. do, a spokesperson for the Department of National Defense told iPolitics this week..

“WWe expect requests for assistance to increase, depending on the availability of provincial emergency resources, ”the spokesperson said in an email response. “This is consistent with the increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters, both at home and abroad.”

Provincial emergency management organizations are the first to respond, but they can call in the military if they are overwhelmed.

“WWe expect that the need for Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) support for missions (Operation Lentus) will continue to increase at a constant rate in the medium to long term, which will result in an increased need for resources, ”he said. declared the spokesperson.

Operation Lentus is the CAF’s mission to respond to natural disasters.

While the military expects more deployments to require more resources, it is difficult to know when and how.

As the nature of the missions (of Operation Lentus) is unpredictable, there is no way to say exactly how or when this might impact our resources, ”the spokesperson said. “CAF’s requests for assistance are not predictable and therefore no amount is planned or set aside in advance. “

The cost of disaster relief has fluctuated wildly since 2013, according to figures provided to iPolitics by the Department of National Defense (DND).

In fiscal year 2017-18, thousands of troops and hundreds of vehicles were sent across the country to help six provinces deal with ice storms, floods and wildfires, according to a ministry. breakdown. DND spent $ 14 million on incremental costs, which are costs attributable to a specific mission.

In fiscal year 2014-2015, however, natural disaster relief cost the ministry just under $ 150,000.

While DND cannot predict with certainty how much future deployments will cost, it anticipates “more cyclical events,” the spokesperson said. These include the seasons of fires and floods, said Jonathan Vance, former Chief of the Defense Staff, speaking to the House Defense Committee in 2018.

The CAF plans for cyclical events, such as floods and forest fires, including such things as forecasting critical areas and assessing capacity gaps, ”the spokesperson said.

This planning includes “the identification, preparation and pre-positioning of Forces, facilitators and reserves (who) would be required to respond to fire, flood, natural disaster and the routing of goods.” humanitarian aid ”, as well as“ computer simulations, planning conferences, teleconferences, tabletop exercises, field simulations, etc. “Said the spokesperson.

The use of the military for more and more natural disasters is a source of concern, said Lt. Gen. Wayne Eyre, acting chief of staff, talk to the canadian press Last year. If this continues to be commonplace, which the ministry said it expects, it could hamper the military’s combat readiness, Eyre said.

Despite the expected increase and four deployments to date in 2021, the CAF is still ready to fight, the spokesperson said..

Although the increase in natural disasters has had an impact on the number of missions (Operation Lentus) performed by the CAF, it has not yet affected our combat readiness, ”they said.

“Mincentives are always in place to ensure that CAF support on the international stage, both for combat and non-combat missions, never suffers, ”the spokesperson said.

“This includes relying more heavily on the Reserve Force for domestic operations, at times, or working with federal and provincial partners to ensure the most efficient use of CAF resources here at home. “

The more frequent use of reserves has not changed the structure of the reserve forces, “nor the way they train or are employed, but simply the frequency with which they are called,” said the spokesperson.

The military response to more natural disasters is also of concern to Adam MacDonald, member of the International Council of Canada, who wrote a test on the subject for the Institute of the Conference of Defense Associations.

There is a “growing trend for the military (increasingly responding to national and) localized environmental disasters, which are expected to increase, given climate change,” he told iPolitics.

MacDonald worries “that this is already built into what the military was going to do in the future, without really thinking politically about whether or not we want the military to do it,” he said. declared.

As climate change continues to cause large-scale natural disasters and the military expects the military to continue to assist, MacDonald has suggested two solutions, without explicitly arguing for either. ‘other.

The first is that army reserves play a more active role in emergency management.

“I don’t think it’s realistic for a number of reasons,” he said. “Number 1 is that the reserve is a force of volunteers,” and volunteers might not want to fight fires or other disasters.

The second is that reserves are trained to do the same job as regular forces, so playing a more active role in emergency management could take time compared to training to replace regular forces when deployed overseas. , did he declare.

The other option is to create a new department, similar to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the United States, which is explicitly responsible for responding to disasters.

“This is the question, ‘do we need to build capacity and expertise to (deal with) the increasing likelihood of natural disasters and other national problems? ”Said MacDonald.

“This is where the FEMA structure could work, but it could be a bit difficult, given that each province has their own emergency management organization, so there could be (battles) over who is in charge. enough to.”

Helping provinces deal with natural disasters is a core function of the CAF, as defined in the 2017 Defense Ministry report. policy document, “Strong, secure and committed”.

The use of CAF members to help provinces is increasingly common, says analysis by military experts Christian Leuprecht and Peter Kasurak for the Center for International Governance Innovation.

From 1996 to 2006, the CAF was deployed on 12 weather-related missions. Between 2007 and 2016, this number rose to 20.

From 2017 to 2019 alone, the CAF was mobilized for 15 missions.

In a mission last year dubbed Operation Laser, the CAF even helped long-term care homes in Quebec and Ontario that were overwhelmed by COVID. Other than this effort, the CAF has only been deployed to the provinces once: to help Newfoundland and Labrador weather a major snowstorm in January 2020.

In 2021, the army has so far been deployed in Manitoba, Ontario and British Columbia to fight forest fires, and in the Yukon to help protect against flooding.

More iPolitics


read more
Non profit living

The logic of Cori Bush’s fight for the moratorium on evictions


Cori Bush knows the violence that can stem from homelessness – and how it so often begins with deportation. Local surveys have found that from 12% to almost half of people living on the streets blame the eviction for their homelessness. Bush, who is now the Democratic Representative of the United States from Missouri, lived in a Ford Explorer with her then husband and two young children for three months after the family was deported in 2001.

It considers the right to housing to be a central principle of environmental justice. Homelessness and housing insecurity, she argued, hamper families’ ability to access the resources – clean water, fresh food, heating and air conditioning – needed to survive. The past year has been particularly deadly for homeless people, as relentless heat waves, poor COVID-19 precautions and unhealthy air quality levels exacerbated by wildfires and pollution have made life on the streets even more dangerous. At the same time, cities across the country have decided to criminalize housing settlements and limit the rights of the homeless.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through what I’ve been through, ever,” Bush told The Associated Press. So when the White House said last week it couldn’t extend the federal moratorium on evictions – which has banned evictions since March 2020 to curb the spread of COVID-19 – by possibly letting it expire, it took the fight in hand. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimated that 11.4 million adult renters were on the verge of eviction.

For four nights, Bush slept outside the United States Capitol, demanding that President Joe Biden extend the moratorium. In the end, she and her congressional allies won. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, issued a new moratorium on evictions that will last until October 3. which would cover areas where 90 percent of the US population lives. The CDC’s new moratorium comes after the Biden administration claimed it did not have the power to extend the eviction ban – and after some localities have already started resuming evictions. (Despite the moratorium, declining state protections and inadequate legal services have led to at least 450,000 evictions during the pandemic, according to the Princeton University Eviction Lab.)

Representative Cori Bush speaks with supporters outside the United States Capitol to call for an extension of the federal moratorium on evictions on July 31, 2021. Photo by Joshua Roberts / Getty Images

In a column for Time last week, Bush denounced the “consequences of our government’s failure to provide the basic necessities that people need to survive.” On the same day, she introduced a “Homeless Bill of Rights,” which calls on Congress to end homelessness in the United States for good by 2025 by investing in affordable housing, universal housing vouchers and social services for people most likely to live on the streets.

While many environmental activists, including the Sunrise movement, have called the new moratorium a victory for climate justice, Bush and other housing advocates argue that protection is one of many that must be instituted to ensure housing and environmental justice for America’s most vulnerable .

Julian Gonzalez, a water policy lobbyist with nonprofit group Earthjustice, says issues such as unaffordable public services are another front in the fight to ensure housing security. (Disclosure: Earthjustice is a Grist advertiser.)

“The affordability of utilities, especially the affordability of water, is a big part of the housing crisis and environmental justice,” Gonzalez told Grist. “Eventually the moratorium on evictions is going to be lifted and people are going to be grappling with bills, and they are going to have their water and electricity cut off – with that comes displacement and eviction.”

This is especially important, according to Gonzalez, because while there are state and national programs to provide assistance for energy bills, there are none for water. Households across the country face billions of dollars in utility debt, and hundreds of thousands of homes face utility cuts. Earthjustice and other organizations across the country are calling for the inclusion of water and utility assistance programs in the next congressional infrastructure bill, which in its current version only includes a pilot low-income rural water assistance program in 40 towns without authorized funding.

Courtney McKinney, director of communications at the nonprofit Western Center on Law and Poverty, said the United States should create a system that permanently limits the prevalence of evictions. The center is working to create state-based legal aid funds, dubbed the “homelessness prevention fund”. Across the country, only 10 percent of tenants who go through eviction proceedings have legal representation, compared to 90 percent of landlords.

The eviction creates an endless cycle of substandard housing, McKinney argues. According to Princeton’s Eviction Lab, 70% of evicted tenants experience serious quality-of-life issues in the next home they move into.

“Across the country, the climate is making the situation even more dire,” McKinney told Grist. “In the West, in particular, climate change, substandard housing and homelessness are a deadly reality in the future.”




read more
Canadian army

IDF Facing Israel’s Next Major Threat: Climate Change


The Israel Defense Forces has started to consider how to incorporate the dangers of climate change into their threat assessments, although some are urging the military to do much more and recognize that global warming is a major strategic threat to the country.

Netta Blass, an officer in the military’s strategic division, told a meeting of the Ministry of Environmental Protection on Monday that her unit was working with her counterparts in the IDF planning unit to examine the possibility a climate-related work plan and the creation of a special unit.

These two divisions, she said, also liaise with the Department of Environment’s Climate Change Preparedness Directorate, which held the sixth meeting on Monday since its inception in 2018, opening up part to more of 100 external people.

“The subject is on our agenda,” she said.

Michael Herzog, international researcher at Washington Institute and a retired IDF brigadier general who headed the army’s strategic planning division, was involved with a small team of academics and others in trying to get the defense establishment to recognize and adapt to the enormous implications of global warming.

Brigadier General (Retired) Michael Herzog. (Courtesy)

He told The Times of Israel on Tuesday that he thought the military was “waking up,” but, he said, “there isn’t enough awareness at the top.

“It’s good that they appointed someone down there, but I think what we really need to see is top executives taking care of it and the budgets are allocated and then you know that it is serious, ”he added.

The IDF’s work is still in its infancy, officials said.

In June, former IDF chief of staff Gadi Eisenkot told the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), where he is now a senior researcher, that unlike the US military, where climate change was an integral part, it was “not discussed” within the IDF and relegated to the “most marginal” place among all issues handled by the military.

This despite the potential of global warming to have an impact on runways and aircraft formation, he said during a confab held (in hebrew) to launch the INSS publication “Environment, Climate and National Security: A New Front for Israel”. The military was already changing training schedules to make sure soldiers were not outside during the hottest hours, he added.

An abandoned watchtower near a military road, Judean Desert, January 4, 2018 (Dario Sanchez / Flash90)

Gideon Behar, the Foreign Ministry’s special envoy for climate change and sustainability, has also been actively involved in the attempt to have climate change recognized as a threat to national security.

Gideon Béhar. (Courtesy)

“We have to go much faster,” he urged attendees at Monday’s meeting. “The rhythm of [climate] change is faster than expected and impacts are increasingly difficult to predict. No one else will correct the things that we ourselves don’t do today. This is our shift and we need to work day and night to strengthen preparedness, as well as mitigation. “

Stressing the importance of regional cooperation to ensure that neighboring states can build their resilience against the effects of global warming, Behar revealed that two years ago, Cyprus launched a regional climate cooperation initiative between countries Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (excluding North Africa).

Despite a business disruption during the coronavirus pandemic, 12 working groups have been set up and a regional meeting is scheduled for mid-October, in which Israel will participate, he said.

The IDF could look to the US military for advice, with the Pentagon leading the way in mainstreaming climate change, Dr Yehuda Troen of the Knesset’s Research and Information Unit said at the time. from the same meeting.

Work on the plans began in 2014 in light of the U.S. military’s need to be more active at the North Pole – where melting glaciers have enabled a higher Russian presence, and to provide humanitarian assistance, conduct operational activities, intelligence gathering and training, in a warming world.

In this file photo from July 22, 2017, a polar bear comes out of the water to walk on the ice in Franklin Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. (AP Photo / David Goldman, on file)

Two years ago, the U.S. military presented Congress with a comprehensive climate preparedness report at 148 military bases, detailing the risks of events such as recurrent floods, droughts and wildfires today and 20 years to come, Troen said.

Last year, it published a Climate Resilience Handbook, outlining measures that must be implemented.

The Israeli military has already experienced these problems.

At the start of last year, flooding of a number of underground hangars caused damage estimated at NIS 30 million (9.3 million) to eight F-16 fighter jets and their infrastructure.

However, it does not appear to have prompted the military to take major action.

“It is not really clear what the IDF is doing,” Troen said, adding that “the National Security Council has said it is not really dealing with the matter, although it would be ready to cooperate.”

An F-16 fighter jet sits in a flooded hangar at Hatzor Air Base in southern Israel in January 2020 (Social media)

The current director of the NSC, Meir Ben-Shabbat, is due to retire at the end of August. He will be replaced by the 45-year-old former Mossad officer Eyal Hulata.

Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg is also trying to get the government to recognize climate change as a national strategic threat.

The climate crisis and responsible journalism

As an environmental reporter for The Times of Israel, I try to convey the facts and science behind climate change and environmental degradation, explain – and criticize – official policies affecting our future, and describe the Israeli technologies that can be part of the solution.

I am passionate about the natural world and disheartened by the dismal lack of awareness of environmental issues of most of the public and politicians in Israel.

I am proud to do my part to keep The Times of Israel readers properly informed on this vital topic – which can and must lead to policy change.

Your support, by joining The Times of Israel community, allows us to continue our important work. Would you like to join our community today?

Thank you,

Sue surke, Environment Journalist

Join the Times of Israel community

Join our community

Already a member? Log in to no longer see this

Are you serious. We appreciate this!

That’s why we come to work every day – to provide discerning readers like you with must-see coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other media, we have not set up a paywall. But since the journalism we do is expensive, we invite readers for whom The Times of Israel has become important to help support our work by joining The Times of Israel community.

For as little as $ 6 per month, you can help support our quality journalism while benefiting from The Times of Israel WITHOUT ADVERTISING, as well as access to exclusive content reserved for members of the Times of Israel community.

Join our community

Join our community

Already a member? Log in to no longer see this


read more
Canadian army

Smoke from wildfires in the west causes air pollution across the country


July 20 (Reuters) – Raging wildfires across the western United States and Canada, including a two-week “monster” fire in Oregon, spewed smoke and soot on Tuesday which blew eastward and caused harmful air pollution to New York City.

In 13 western states, more than 80 large active wildfires have charred nearly 1.3 million acres (526,090 hectares) of vegetation desiccated by drought in recent weeks, an area larger than the Delaware, according to the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho.

Several hundred more fires have burned in western and central Canada. They included 86 classified as uncontrollable on Tuesday in British Columbia alone, which led authorities to declare a state of emergency.

The jet stream and other transcontinental air currents carried smoke and ash thousands of kilometers. Residents of remote towns felt the contamination of the air in their eyes, noses and lungs.

In New York City, where a gray haze enveloped the Manhattan skyline, the Air Quality Index (AQI) for fine particles reached 170, a level considered harmful even to healthy people and nine times higher than World Health Organization exposure recommendations. Philadelphia reached 172.

Other northeastern cities, including Boston and Hartford, Connecticut, had readings in the unhealthy zone above 150. Residents were advised to wear face masks outdoors to limit exposure.

Smoke from Canadian wildfires in Manitoba and Ontario in the United States likely pushed the AQI in Detroit and Cleveland above 125, considered unhealthy for sensitive people, the NIFC meteorologist said, Nick Nauslar. Smoke from forest fires from the western provinces of Canada has reached east to Ontario, triggering broad government air quality warnings.

In the western United States, parts of Idaho and Montana suffered unhealthy levels of air pollution from 40 nearby large fires and smoke from the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon, currently the largest in the United States.

Heavy exposure to smoke from wildfires has been linked to long-term respiratory consequences for firefighters, including a significantly elevated risk of developing asthma, according to a University of Alberta study released this week. week.

The general population also faces serious health effects.

The Bootleg Fire burns through vegetation near Paisley, Oregon, USA, July 20, 2021. REUTERS / David Ryder

Read more

“Exposure to smoke from wildfires (…) increases susceptibility to respiratory infections, including COVID, increases the severity of these infections and makes recovery more difficult,” the Federal Councilor said by email. Margaret Key Air Resources.

THE “MONSTER” FIRE ENTERING THE 3RD WEEK

The forest fires themselves posed a more direct risk to life and property.

The Bootleg Fire has blackened 388,600 acres (157,260 hectares) of dry brush and wood in and around the Fremont-Winema National Forest, about 250 miles south of Portland, since July 6. Only three other forest fires in Oregon in the past century have burned more territory.

As of Tuesday, an army of some 2,200 people had succeeded in digging containment lines around 30% of the outskirts of the blaze, as the blaze spread further east and north.

Incident commander Rob Allen said in his daily report that the dry fuels in the fire area “will continue to burn and smoke for weeks.”

“Fighting this fire is a marathon, not a sprint,” Allen wrote. “We’re in there for as long as it takes to contain this monster safely.”

At least 67 houses were destroyed and 3,400 others were listed as threatened, with around 2,100 people ordered to evacuate or to be ready to flee at any time.

Western conflagrations, marking a heavier-than-normal start to the wildfire season, coincided with record heat that has ravaged much of the region in recent weeks and left hundreds dead.

Scientists said the increasing frequency and intensity of forest fires is largely attributable to prolonged drought and increased episodes of excessive heat that are symptomatic of climate change.

The Bootleg fire is so large that it sometimes generated its own climate – towering clouds of pyrocumulus of condensed moisture sucked through the fire’s smoke column from the burnt vegetation and of the surrounding air. These clouds can create thunderstorms and strong winds capable of starting new fires and spreading flames.

Reporting by Peter Szekely in New York and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; additional reporting by Nia Williams in Calgary; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


read more
Canadian army

Letters to the Editor: July 20: “How many people … would vote for a party that does not recognize climate change as real?” Verification of curators as well as other letters to the editor


Keep your opinions sharp and informed. Receive the Opinion newsletter. register today.

Legal process

Re This is a crime scene. When will Canada take responsibility for delivering justice? (July 16): How we deal with all of these crimes is far from clear.

It is true, as one letter writer tells us (Things To Come – July 15), that the federal Crown has constitutional responsibility and has fiduciary obligations to Indigenous peoples. It is also true that the Crown is also responsible for others in Canada and has duties to them. The need to balance different functions like these, when they come into conflict, is one of the reasons we have a justice system.

The story continues under the ad

I find that indigenous peoples have, on the whole, been well served by the judiciary, and the author of the letter is wrong to suggest that the government should stop using the courts to resolve these issues fairly.

Pierre Amour Toronto

You and what army?

Re Former High General Vance Charged with Obstructing Justice (July 16): There is an old adage that every country has a choice of two armies – their own or someone else’s. A strong army is vital, but it is quite obvious to me that the army in this country is broken.

Maybe someone else’s army is better.

Douglas Cornwall Ottawa

Conservative confusion

Re The conservative temperament is repulsive (July 14): It is especially politics that prevents me from voting conservative. It is a mystery to me why we do not have a socially liberal and fiscally conservative party in Canada.

Maybe the pollsters know this better, but I would like a party to be selective about what the government does, make sure it does these things well and make it clear why it does not go above and beyond. I have seen the Conservatives spend too much energy getting the government to interfere in the lives of citizens on social issues.

The story continues under the ad

When they were in government I think they spent way too much money on subsidy programs like home renovations in the name of job creation. What about infrastructure, the encouragement and regulation of competitive markets, effective and efficient plans to tackle climate change, a good balance between public and private health care options and public services? effective?

So maybe over 41 percent of the population would consider voting Conservative.

Gord flaten Regina


Given our recent historic heat wave, I wonder how many people in Lytton, or anywhere in British Columbia, would vote for a party that won’t recognize climate change as real?

Arlene Churchill Surrey, BC

Careful examination

Re Liberals Bank on Urban Votes with Affordable Child Care Plan (July 16): Child care is not just an urban issue. Evidence shows that quality child care is important to rural / remote / suburban families, but its delivery is hampered by the approach to the child care market in Canada.

The story continues under the ad

Is the Liberal child care program expensive? Not when compared to spending by peers at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, or astronomical child care costs paid by Canadian parents.

Intrusive? Not with the evidence-based program elements of Ottawa and the provinces willingly collaborating in the development of their own programs.

Inflexible? A federal role should not mean a “one size fits all” outcome. Responsive public policy is the best way to meet a diversity of child care needs – shaped by diverse cultures, abilities, needs and schedules – using a pan-Canadian approach similar to Medicare. .

We now have a much better understanding of the importance of quality child care for children, families, women and the economy, and the best ways to ensure that this becomes a reality.

Martha Friendly Childcare Resource and Research Unit Toronto

Lack of food

Re Indoor Dining Is Back – But Restaurant Staff Are Not (July 15): Maybe if restaurants offered safer working environments, more staff would be willing to come back. I have been disappointed by the negative reactions of many restaurateurs to any pandemic restrictions.

The story continues under the ad

My advice: make vaccination compulsory for staff and customers, then workers would be more willing to come back and the still vulnerable elderly would feel at ease in catering establishments.

Glen morehouse Washago, Ont.


As sympathetic as I am to contributor Stephen Beckta’s cry for a feedback from his staff, I can’t help but think back to those first months, about 20 years ago, after quitting my job as a professional cook in some of the best restaurants in Toronto. .

Two weeks later, I noticed that the arch of my foot was returning to normal, I was well rested with no 12-hour workdays, and most notably, I had a social life again.

I can’t help but think of all the cooks who are suffering without work, but it seems the pandemic has given them a reason to reconsider their career choice. As long as bad hours and most importantly terrible money play out in the restaurant job in the back of the house, I think we can expect a talent shortage to continue for some time.

David Roy Toronto

The story continues under the ad

Medical memory

Re Remembering Our Front-line Heroes (Editorial, July 16): I can understand and sympathize with nurses in this country.

Imagine working long hours with all the stress of COVID-19 and having to deal with thousands of people who are hesitant to vaccinate or those who think it’s a hoax. They put their lives on the line for people who don’t care.

After 15 months they had had enough, especially when the provincial governments praised them but refused to raise wages. Indeed, praise is not enough and we now have a nursing shortage in Canada.

What a tragedy, and so easily resolved.

Robert Tremblay Gatineau, Que.


Alberta Health Services recently returned to the bargaining table with the United Nurses of Alberta and demanded much denigration and a 3 percent pay cut!

The story continues under the ad

All frontline healthcare workers should receive bonuses, not pay cuts. It is a shameful treatment.

Dorothy Watson Toronto

Re New Toronto Park Honors Frontline Heroes of the 1840s (July 16): Perhaps pandemic memorials should be as common as those of our politicians.

Over the past 400 years, dozens of pandemics have ravaged North America. Smallpox, measles and influenza ravaged the northern half of the continent in the early 1600s, and several times thereafter. Typhus, tuberculosis and polio followed.

Each of these pandemics had more serious consequences than COVID-19. Entire generations have been marked and orphaned, especially among indigenous communities. We forget this story because of our modern successes in public health, especially through vaccination and the provision of clean water.

Maybe now is a good time to remember a little more of our medical history, teach it and commemorate it.

John riley Mono, Ont.


Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address, and daytime phone number. Try to limit the letters to less than 150 words. Letters can be edited for length and clarity. To send a letter by e-mail, click here: [email protected]


read more
International headquarters

Secrets Alone Won’t Save Us: Providing a ‘Decision Advantage’ on Climate Security


When I was a CIA officer, one thing I could share with my family was a museum tour at Langley headquarters. Visitors would marvel at the cover-up devices and exclaim at stories of derring-do in the name of gathering hidden information. When we got to the Analysis Branch, however, they pretended to be interested. The printed copies of the reports weren’t as interesting as the robotic spy fish exhibit.

The theft of secrets has always captured the public imagination of the intelligence profession, for good reason. Secrets were the claim to fame of the CIA’s predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services. Prior to D-Day, it was “Wild Bill” Donovan’s placement of spies in European ports and behind enemy lines that gathered the information needed to support a successful invasion. As President Dwight Eisenhower said of the Office of Strategic Services: “If (he) had done nothing else, intelligence gathered alone before D-Day would justify its existence.

Of course, the security and intelligence landscape has changed dramatically since Eisenhower’s time. More often than not, “going behind enemy lines” means connecting to a computer, not jumping out of a plane. The risks facing the United States are more complex, involving not only a mix of state and non-state actors, but also systemic factors such as climate change, which the Chief Intelligence Officer ‘s 2021 Global Trends report identified as one of the few trends “setting the parameters” of our future world. This world is a world in which temperatures and sea levels are rising dramatically, and weather conditions are becoming more and more unpredictable and extreme. It is likely that millions of people will be displaced and forced to migrate, tensions will increase within and between states as water and food insecurity increases, and governments will find it increasingly difficult to manage aggravating risks as climatic risks intersect with other stressors. There is not a single current US national security concern that will not be affected in some way by the climate crisis.

What does a security landscape shaped by climate change mean to the way the US intelligence community does business? For some, this suggests a return to first principles. Doubling down on what my family has always found most intriguing about the CIA museum – the collection of secrets – as a way to distinguish the intelligence community from the private sector and the open source world. As Joshua Rovner argued, “the comparative advantage of secret agencies is secret information.” Of course, collecting secrets about governments’ climate policy plans and intentions can be important. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry lamented the lack of climate fundraising at a conference earlier this year. He argued that if climate change is truly an existential threat, then the US intelligence community should do as much effort to collect information on the positions of US adversaries on climate negotiations as it does to pinpoint their positions on nuclear agreements.

Secrets, however, are not enough. To achieve the goal of consistently providing a strategic advantage to the United States, the intelligence community must have the ability to put these secrets into context – analyze and communicate how they intersect with other risk information. for the national security of the United States. The trick is not to give up secrets or try to duplicate what the private sector or academia is doing, but rather to marry clandestine collection with other information from all sources. This is of course not a new concept in intelligence studies. Academics and practitioners have spilled gallons of ink debating the best ways to integrate open source information. The founder of the analyst profession in the United States, Sherman Kent, argued that integrating data and consulting with outside experts was essential to a strong profession. Most of the analysts I have known in my career prided themselves on their in-depth contextual knowledge of the regions they covered – history, academic experts, local news sources, arts and culture.

However, bringing a climate lens to intelligence isn’t as simple as bringing in just one more unclassified source. It’s different because of the type of information to integrate, the skills needed to do it, and the systemic nature of the risk. First of all, it’s hard science in addition to social science. This requires a “climate-savvy” workforce with scientific knowledge. This does not mean creating large teams within the intelligence community that do climate science. This means that intelligence officers are able to regularly understand and integrate climate models and analyzes into their work.

What does it look like in practice? It can be as simple as using references like Climate Central’s “Surging Seas” tool or regularly consulting primary sources and scientific literature. It also means leveraging more complex tools and practices. Advances in machine learning and computing power are leading to new modeling tools that can provide a wealth of relevant information to intelligence analysts. One example is the use of “ensemble assessments”, which are repeated runs of the same climate model, adjusting the starting point conditions each time. Such sets allow scientists to more clearly show a range of potential regional climate trends – important information that analysts need to incorporate into their work when assessing possible future economic, political and conflict scenarios in different parts of the world. Another example is that of “high resolution” climate models, which, thanks to advances in the power of supercomputers, can better represent atmospheric processes on a small scale. These models allow greater precision in risk assessments.

Moving forward, building on existing climate modeling approaches and tools is probably not enough for the intelligence community to truly address climate security risks. As Alice Hill, a former climate adviser to the National Security Council, recently detailed, planners across the United States are desperate for more localized climate data so they can craft better adaptation responses. Intelligence analysts need this kind of information as well, but in regions around the world. For example, although scientists believe Africa will face some of the greatest risks from climate change, accurate climate data on the continent is lacking, inhibiting useful predictive modeling of climate impacts. Without more localized and robust predictive climate models for Africa, intelligence analysts will not have the information they need to answer the kinds of questions they are sure to receive from policymakers in the years to come: the continent’s conflict zones? In which geographic areas will climate impacts and extremist groups overlap to increase security risks? Will US competitors’ infrastructure support offers to African countries withstand extreme events caused by rising temperatures?

While there are opportunities for the intelligence community to partner with the private sector to develop such capabilities, the first stop should be with US government scientists. Congress has given the intelligence community some tools to achieve this by creating the Climate Security Advisory Council, designed to link US government science and intelligence agencies, and the National Academies Climate Security Roundtable, a mechanism that enables actors in the climate science to provide information. to the intelligence community. Both meetings provide a platform for the community to use to encourage and shape the development of new modeling approaches that meet their specific needs. Moreover, intelligence agencies should use these groupings to pursue truly interdisciplinary analytical reports that marry climate science with social sciences. An example of this type of analysis can be seen in a series of reports and story maps published in recent months by the Woodwell Climate Center and the Council on Strategic Risks, detailing how climate change will shape security risks in strategic regions. of the globe.

Fully realizing this type of approach within the intelligence community – a large government bureaucracy – is not easy. I have already described the ways in which new resources, new leadership and new institutional structures can help. To his credit, the Biden administration has taken many steps to make it happen, as evidenced by the Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad. Equally important, however, are the less immediately tangible changes in organizational culture and mindset. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines acknowledged these challenges in a recent interview,

Climate is an urgent crisis, but it is very difficult for various institutional reasons to integrate it into your daily work in a fully successful way i.e. it is much easier to focus on climate negotiations or on what states do in their policies.

She went on to say however that she was starting to see changes, noting that she had been amazed by,

to what extent, in addition to focusing on China and all of our top threats that we talk about in our annual threat hearings, we [in the intelligence community] came to the conclusion that … investing in science and technology and the tools that allow us to be better at what we do, our institutions, our partnerships, our resilience, our ability to integrate that expertise, is what is really important at this critical moment in our history.

Time will tell if this recognition from the leaders of the intelligence community results in long-term change. If so, maybe one day a future president will sing the praises of the director the same way Ike did of “Wild Bill” Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services. As article after article on this month’s record temperatures around the world points out, the climate will only get worse. And the United States can only navigate this hotter world with an intelligence community that collects foreign secrets, but also has the full range of information, tools, and talent it needs to analyze. these challenges.

Erin Sikorsky is Deputy Director of the Center for Climate and Security and Director of the International Military Council on Climate and Security. Previously, she was Deputy Director of the National Intelligence Council’s Strategic Futures Group in the United States, where she co-authored the quadrennial Global Trends report and led the US intelligence community’s environmental and climate security analysis.

Image: US Air Force (Photo by Master Sgt Elijaih Tiggs)


read more
Non profit living

COVID demonstrated the immense value of higher education communities (opinion)

When I first started quarantining, well over a year ago, I felt like I had been bowled over in a modernized Danteen hellish landscape. Not one of the deepest circles, where you’re frozen in ice and someone gnaws at your head. Just one of the upper benevolent spheres, where you wander aimlessly between your desk and the refrigerator, endlessly refreshing the New York Times home page. As usual, but on top of that.

What I felt was the strange lived experience of reverse: this literary device – famous employee in Dante Hell – where the suffering of a sinner imitates the nature of his sin. Let the punishment match the crime.

Before COVID-19 hit, modern life had already left us atomized, uprooted, addicted to our smartphones. Over the past year, that life has ironically intensified: we have spent our days locked in our one-bedroom apartments, every human connection mediated by a screen, torn from our communities.

The college classroom was no exception. Just weeks after the start of the pandemic, higher education Jeremias were already prophesying a world in which a Brady Bunch of jerky, pixelated faces would become a permanent educational standard. But despite the tribulations of the past year, I came away reassured that liberal residential education never be completely supplanted by e-learning. Screens simply cannot offer what students are looking for: the chance to live and learn with their peers in tight-knit educational communities.

I have made a career of co-creating educational communities, first at Deep Springs College, then with my own nonprofit, Tidelines Institute (formerly the Arete Project), which runs similar shorter duration programs. By tearing apart such communities, COVID-19 has highlighted their immense value. The pandemic, it seems, will pass. As we begin to think about the fall semester, now It’s time to reinvent and reinvigorate educational communities when the doors of the academy finally reopen.

What is an educational community? Part of it is a social community, as it can happen in a dormitory or a sports team. But it is also an intellectual community, with a dynamic life outside the classroom. The educational community opens up from the classroom to personal relationships, extracurricular, work, meals: lived together and oriented towards learning.

The educational community is the best thing a residential college has to offer. The two together prove that education is not just about mastery of content, but the growth of the human being as a whole. Although I am happy to remember a few things about The Divine Comedy, the truth is, I forgot a lot of material from my undergraduate years. It’s not that the content wasn’t important. It is because he played the role of second violin in the vibrant world of inquiry, debate, experimentation and social relations that have gathered around him. In college, I shared this world with a small group of peers and professors. The academic content provided a substrate and sustenance, but it was within the community that my education took place. This is where I grew up.

This is what so many young people are looking for in their college experience. That’s why every college tour guide speaks convincingly about these ramblings all night long about the meaning of life they enjoy with their roommate. This is why a former student of an intensive humanities program advised incoming students to forgo the 1 p.m. class: so that the cohort discussions started in class can continue over lunch and early after. midday.

And that is precisely what online education will never supplant. Administrators charting a post-pandemic path for their institutions would do well to consider both the scientific evidence and the financial prognosis in favor of educational communities. Substantial research links tight-knit cohorts to a range of positive learning outcomes, including literacy and critical thinking gains, improved performance in STEM courses, and perseverance in college. Online education, on the other hand, can often be associated with higher attrition rate, larger success gaps and widespread student dissatisfaction. And for numbers lovers, while the price of online education can have immediate financial appeal, alumni donations are dismal among online education beneficiaries. Alumni donate to places where they have created memories, formed friendships, and made the transition to adulthood with their peers. (Deep Springs, for example, has an enviable alumni donation rate of almost 50 percent.)

It is true that Deep Springs and Tidelines Institute are outliers, striving to bring the educational community to its most vital embodiment. We did this by creating small islands where a small number of inhabitants – students, staff and faculty – participate equally in shared work and a shared world. While not completely abjuring hierarchy or division of labor, any member of the community can chair a hiring committee or swing a hammer, analyze Hegel, analyze data, or lead a camping trip.

These two institutions exist outside of the “normal” academy, but they offer courses that can be adapted for traditional colleges. Indeed, many institutions already offer educational communities of one kind or another. For those who don’t – or want to create more – here are some general precepts.

  • Cohorts are essential. Educational communities must be porous but made up of a dense network of relationships. It must be possible for individuals to really know each other. Six could be a minimum size, while 50 could be a maximum.
  • Students must share a lasting intellectual experience. The content itself can vary widely but should include at least one ongoing course, ideally for a minimum of a year. Directed studies at Yale University is one example.
  • Experiential opportunities work wonders. They strengthen relationships with students, forge community identity, and help students integrate theory and practice. Wild nature and civilization at the University of Montana effectively coupled substantive courses and outdoor exploration.
  • Diversity is a necessity. Educational communities are at serious risk: that students may self-select from groups of peers who look alike, think and act alike. But peer learning is crucial in such communities, which means students have to come with different backgrounds and beliefs.
  • … but not always. Some students thrive in communities where they share common stories with their peers. This is especially true for students from marginalized backgrounds, for whom a strong community can be a deciding factor in college perseverance. the ScHOLA²RS House at the University of Connecticut offers one of many excellent models.
  • The shared meals are excellent. The shared living space is even better.

Educational communities do not need to be totalizing; after all, it’s not The secret story. They can include French majors and physics majors, football stars, climate change activists and classical pianists. They can manifest in the form of formal programs like those mentioned above or, more simply, they can occur spontaneously.

I know how great it is to create a new program. Faculty members without this bandwidth can still cultivate educational communities. They can encourage seminars to adjourn directly to lunch or coffee where conversations can continue informally. They may advise students to set up directed readings with a handful of their peers. They can connect students with similar interests. And, where formal programs exist, they can point students in the right direction.

The pandemic has shown us how precious and necessary educational communities are. Nowhere else in modern life do we have the spaces and structures that can support such communities, and believe me, I watched. They are the product and the pride of residential colleges alone. When we finally get out of this mundane hell, let’s be ready to help them thrive.

read more
International headquarters

UNESCO has always been mired in politics and feuds, but that shouldn’t hurt its work


Australia’s Great Barrier Reef made international headlines this week. This was not good news for the reef, described by David Attenborough as “one of the greatest and most magnificent natural treasures the world possesses”.

A report filed by the UNESCO World Heritage Center recommended adding the reef to the list of 53 other World Heritage sites considered “endangered” – a move the Morrison government suggested was prompted by pressure policies.

The “endangered” classification is important for Australia as the reef is estimated to provide 64,000 jobs and contributes A $ 6.4 billion annually to the economy.

If the World Heritage Committee downgrades the reef as a World Heritage site, it will almost certainly hurt its attractiveness as a tourist destination and therefore Australia’s economic benefits.

But why is such a report from this United Nations agency so important? The reason is that the World Heritage Committee carries considerable weight on the world stage – and politics has indeed been an unfortunate part of its operations since its inception.

The Australian government said it was “blinded” by the UN recommendation to list the Great Barrier Reef as “endangered”.
KYDPL KYODO / AP

“Clearly, there was politics behind that”

UNESCO’s mandate to build peace through international cooperation in the fields of education, science, culture and media freedom derives from its founding principles in 1945 after the Second World War. The preamble to its constitution declares,

… Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defenses of peace must be built.

Nations are elected to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee at a biennial conference of the 193 Member States of UNESCO. This committee has significant power – it is authorized to make decisions on behalf of the world. And while UN member states can complain about its decisions, none can challenge the committee’s independence or authority.

The current chair of the World Heritage Committee is China, which adds to the reason why Australia protested so loudly against his recommendation.

Australian Environment Minister Sussan Ley and Foreign Minister Marise Payne immediately phoned UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay in Paris to express their deep concerns. Ley said,

This decision was flawed and there was clearly politics behind it, and it thwarted the proper process.

The head of the UNESCO World Heritage Marine Program, Dr Fanny Douvere, however, pointed out that the report was a rigorous scientific document with contributions from Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and official government reports on water quality – assessed and analyzed by a team of experts from the World Heritage Center.

Moreover, she said, work on the report began years ago and the Chinese government was “unaware” of the recommendations made.

We have yet to see how this altercation plays out, possibly at the next World Heritage Committee meeting in China in July.

How UNESCO is structured

Behind the scenes of UNESCO there is a complex interplay of international politics and UN bureaucratic processes and actions which sometimes influence the work of the agency.

I was appointed to a senior level within UNESCO from 1995 to 2005, working both in a field office and at its headquarters in Paris, and I played a central role in the attempts of the organization to reform and decentralize its operations in the early 2000s. So I have a good knowledge of the beast from within.

The first thing to realize is that there is a gap between the headquarters and the field. Almost all the attention is focused on the UNESCO Headquarters. This is where the ambassadors of the Member States have their offices and where all the important committees are based. Consequently, decisions on international conventions and actions are the responsibility of the Parisian administration.

But this is not where the most effective program action takes place – it is the work of more than 50 field offices around the world. And UNESCO’s field offices are making a real difference.

In my own work in Indonesia, as an example, we reformed the entire basic education system in the country from centralized rote learning to decentralized open classroom exploration. We have also helped the country emerge from total media censorship by helping pass legislation to ensure a free press and have built a radio network of 32 independent stations across the country trained in investigative journalism.

Headquarters provided excellent technical assistance, but the field office put on the show and found the funding.

Much of the criticism leveled at UNESCO focuses on its overly bureaucratic structure and low productivity. This criticism is largely fueled by the attention to what is happening at headquarters in Paris, and not in the field offices in places like New Delhi, Jakarta and Maputo.



Read more: The Australian government has been “blinded” by the UN recommendation to place the Great Barrier Reef in danger. But it’s not a big surprise


Member States withdrawing funding

The second thing to understand about UNESCO is that it is a “technical” agency, not a “funding” organization like, for example, the United Nations Development Program.

Because the funding depends on the Member States, this has real consequences. Sensitive political issues can anger member states, causing them to withdraw from the organization – along with their funding.

For example, after Palestine was added as a full member in 2011, the United States and Israel stopped paying their dues. The United States, which accounted for over 20% of UNESCO’s budget, accumulated some $ 600 million in unpaid dues.

The Trump administration then withdrew the United States completely from the organization after the World Heritage Committee designated the Old City of Hebron in the West Bank as a Palestinian World Heritage Site in 2017. The United States Ambassador to the United States to the West Bank UN representative Nikki Haley called the politicization of UNESCO “chronic embarrassment.”

Israel and the United States opposed the decision to designate Hebron as a Palestinian World Heritage site which was also “in danger”.
Bernat Armangue / AP

It was not the first time that the United States had withdrawn. In 1984, the Reagan administration withdrew from UNESCO amid complaints about the way it was run and what one US official, Gregory Newell, called “foreign politicization.” He decried what he perceived as

… An endemic hostility towards the institutions of a free society – especially those that protect a free press, free markets and, most importantly, individual human rights.

Bearing in mind UNESCO’s mandate

UNESCO’s listing of the Great Barrier Reef as “endangered” is at its heart a moral decision concerned with minimizing the effects of climate change and urging Member States to act.

But because it is played out at the headquarters level, there is a whiff of political commitment. It is, after all, that states play the politics of power with their members, their funding and their influence.



Read more: Is UNESCO World Heritage Status for Cultural Sites Killing What He Loves?


But the organization is so much more when you move away from the sparkle of the world’s capitals to the field. Here, the agency’s business is to build trust and connect with communities to make things happen.

This is in line with UNESCO’s mandate, which is important to remember when attention is diverted to self-serving quarrels among its members.


read more