close
Non profit living

Colleges expand mental health services for students

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased need for mental health services in colleges as students grapple with the social and economic consequences of closed campuses, online learning, and in some cases, loss of life. illness or death of their loved ones. Now, as most institutions return to more normal in-person operations, they are relying on telehealth mental health services to provide assistance to students, whether on campus or off campus.

“We have seen that many schools are focusing more on their services and making sure that they offer a health and wellness offering such as telehealth and teletherapy,” said Seli Fakorzi, director of health operations. mental health at TimelyMD, a telehealth provider. “Campuses are now wondering if they are offering enough services that offer virtual and in-person support. “

In June 2020, TimelyMD found that 85% of students reported experiencing increased stress and anxiety due to the pandemic and uncertainty about continuing with their education. Another survey from the Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement found that 53% of freshmen reported a substantial increase in mental and emotional exhaustion. Due to the increased need for services, institutions are strengthening their mental health resources for the fall semester. And given the wide range of student needs and living and learning situations – on-campus, off-campus, in-person, remote, hybrid – many institutions are using technology in innovative ways to deliver advisory services. and support to all who seek them.

T. Anne Hawkins, director of the Carruth Center for Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of West Virginia, said she and her team recognize they need to do something “outside the box” for the next semester. fall. So they established a one-year partnership with Talkspace, an online platform and app that connects students with licensed therapists. Students can send text, audio, photo and video messages to their therapist anytime, as well as schedule live video sessions. Hawkins said the partnership is especially helpful for out-of-state students because of telehealth licensing laws. As of the semester started on Aug. 18, 178 students have signed up for the app, Hawkins said.

“We know some of our students haven’t returned and are out of state or elsewhere in the state navigating virtual learning,” Hawkins said. “Our goal is really to increase mental health services to support students and help them manage the events of the pandemic and get back to in-person learning.”

She added that the university has a “large menu” of mental health resources, both in person and virtually. In addition to seeing counselors on campus during office hours, WVU students have 24/7 access to the Crisis Text Line, a mental health service where they can text a trained counselor. live that responds to messages privately. Students can text the counselor, who asks questions, empathizes, and actively listens. ProtoCall is another mental health service that students can call for crisis intervention and stabilization, as well as for referrals for network providers and other resources.

Such programs hold great promise in helping students. Studies have shown that teletherapy can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety, as one researcher said. The New York Times. Even before the pandemic, researchers from the Milbank Memorial Fund, a nonprofit health foundation, drew similar conclusions, also pointing out that behavioral telehealth can cost less than in-person visits and affect more people as well.

“What we’ve seen is that telehealth is essentially as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy – and retention rates are higher,” said David Mohr, director of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies at Feinberg. School of Medicine at Northwestern University. the American Psychological Association.

At Belmont University in Tennessee, Katherine Cornelius, director of counseling services, said students were torn between the need for in-person or virtual mental health services. In the first two weeks of classes, the institution saw a 60% increase in the number of counseling appointments compared to 2019, Cornelius said. His office has worked to increase access to mental health for non-traditional students, including graduate students or those in full-time employment.

“Over the past few years, we’ve really focused on improving access to care and reducing barriers,” Cornelius said. “Telehealth has been a huge benefit for this. Students don’t have to go to campus, and we’ve seen that a lot of students are really concerned about their health, so they really feel more comfortable doing virtual tours.

Before the onset of the pandemic, Belmont purchased Therapy Assistance Online, a virtual self-help platform that offers self-guided tools, educational and interactive modules, reviews, and progress tracking tools, to which all students , teachers and Belmont staff have free access. This fall, the school also purchased TimelyCare from Timely MD, which provides free virtual physical and mental health support and is available 24/7 to all students at Belmont, Cornelius said.

“Student life doesn’t end at 4:30 pm when our office is closed. A lot of them are just getting started, ”Cornelius said. “So TimelyCare kind of fills the gap after working hours. “

At the University of Virginia, Nicole Ruzek, director of counseling and psychology services, said students were grappling with issues beyond the pandemic. Many have felt the impact of racial injustice following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among others, at the hands of police, as well as the anxiety over the climate crisis and the 2020 presidential election. which divides. She said students seemed to like in-person and virtual counseling, so her department offers hybrid options. In 2018, the university contracted with SilverCloud, a virtual mental health platform that focuses on digital therapy, to give students access to informational videos, mental health quizzes and interactive tools.

In addition, the university signed a contract with TimelyMD “to continue to meet this demand for service,” said Ruzek. The contract allows students to have 24/7 virtual access to individual counseling, psychiatric services and on-demand support with a healthcare professional.

“Some students really appreciate having telehealth as an option. It can be much more convenient if they don’t want to travel, ”said Ruzek. “Having that option to be able to engage with a mental health provider, through a remote service, I think it’s really helpful. Then there are other students who really want to be seen in person.

Cooper Union, a private college in New York where the majority of students commute, has had to develop mental health resources that meet with students while they are on campus and when they are at home, said Chris Chamberlin , dean of students.

“We are small and we are trying to capitalize on our geography and all the resources that are available to us here in New York and in our neighborhood to provide students with significant access to care,” Chamberlin said.

In partnership with TimelyMD, Cooper Union created Cooper Care, an online app and platform that gives students 24/7 access to virtual healthcare providers. Chamberlin said that using Cooper Care with the institution’s own counseling program created “maximum flexibility” for students to meet their needs. He added that students are encouraged during Welcome Week to download and configure the Cooper Care app so that in the event of a crisis, they can immediately access help.

And it’s not difficult to engage students in telehealth resources if campuses standardize their use, said Fakorzi of TimelyMD. 24-hour services like TimelyCare can connect students with help during late hours and early when in-person care is not available in a crisis.

“If the problems boil over at 4 am I think it’s definitely a benefit for campuses to have a backup program to say, ‘Hey, this is also a place you can get help. “” said Fakorzi. “But it also gives the campus the security of knowing the help is there.”

There is always a stigma around helping with mental health, said Cornelius, of Belmont. Some students are concerned about confidentiality, while others come from backgrounds where mental health treatment is not the norm. And there is greater stigma against students struggling with mental health issues other than depression and anxiety, she said, including bipolar disorder and trauma.

Ruzek of the University of Virginia said the shift to more virtual mental health resources has opened up access for students from families or cultural backgrounds who do not typically seek mental health help.

“They don’t even have to come through our doors anymore,” Ruzek said. “They can connect with us electronically and we can put them in touch with the right resource without their parents knowing, if they don’t want their families to know, or even without their peers knowing if they are. are in a private location. “

Chamberlin agreed, saying the switch to telehealth “created access in a way that did not exist before”, when many mental health resources were confined to a certain time and place on campus. .

“More and more students are engaging in our virtual programming, whether it’s seeing a therapist remotely or attending a workshop they normally couldn’t do,” Chamberlin said. “I also think we’ve continued to do a number of things virtually that we could have done in person, because we also know that people learn differently and engage differently.”


Source link

read more
History organization

Social Justice Groups Promote Faneuil Hall Name Change, Citizens Speak Out – The Daily Free Press

Faneuil room. The Massachusetts New Democracy Coalition was planning to rally with social rights organization Occupy Boston this weekend in support of Faneuil Hall’s name change, but no protests were held despite widespread support. WITH THE AUTHORIZATION OF ERIC KILBY VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Activists were planning to rally to support Faneuil Hall’s name change over the weekend, but no protests have taken place in the market despite growing support for the cause.

Peter Faneuil, whose building is named after, was an important colonial slave trader. The Massachusetts Coalition for a New Democracy, a Boston-based nonprofit and non-partisan organization, has plans to join the social rights organization Occupy Boston to get city officials to change the name, according to a September 14 press release.

“We urge Boston mayoral candidates to take a stand not only to recognize the horror of Faneuil Hall, but to allow Bostonians to choose not to contribute to the legacy of slavery any longer,” it read. in the Occupy Boston press release.

Occupy Boston has yet to release additional information on why the event hasn’t happened and when future events will take place. The organization could not be reached for comment.

NDC founder Kevin Peterson said the coalition had asked Boston City Council to hold a meeting to discuss the name change for three years.

“Voters can influence in a very public way how the name is associated with the horrific tradition of slavery,” Peterson said.

According to a September 3 survey by MassInc Polling Group, more than half of those polled were in favor of changing Faneuil Hall’s name. Of those polled, 87% said they supported the increase in the number of black-owned businesses at Faneuil Hall and 72% supported the erection of an abolitionist statue of Frederick Douglass.

Jefferson Gomez, who has lived in Boston for 10 years, said he did not support the building’s current name because Faneuil was a slave owner.

“Why do you want to honor someone who [was] pro-slavery? said Gomez. “This is the story that needs to be corrected for the better, so that people understand how things really go.”

Faneuil Hall employee Diane Rossi said it was important to recognize the story of Peter Faneuil’s connection to slavery, while keeping the name intact.

“Don’t dismiss what he did,” Rossi said, “but maybe include information and… don’t hide that fact. It doesn’t make a difference to change the name of the building.

Faneuil Hall artist Mark Aleo said he was “open” to changing the building’s name in honor of Crispus Attucks, the first person killed in the Boston Massacre.

“It is worth discussing and I don’t think I am opposed to it,” he said.

He added, however, that the case for changing buildings named after founding fathers who owned slaves – like United States Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson – is different from buildings named after merchants from slaves.

Rossi said changing the names of historic sites might just be an easy move by politicians to appeal to the general public.

“I think we have a habit of changing things too much to accommodate who may be in office or who disagrees or the temperament of people at the time, instead of acknowledging the fact. that he was a slave owner, ”she said.

Peterson said the NDC would continue to work to protest Faneuil Hall’s name, calling for a boycott of businesses and for mayoral candidates to pledge to rename the building.

“Our elected officials refused, maybe out of fear, maybe out of a lack of understanding of how they go about having these conversations, especially around Faneuil Hall,” he said, “but they didn’t failed to produce positive action. “

Peterson said he believed the renaming of Faneuil Hall, which attracts 18 million visitors each year, would have bigger implications for the city of Boston.

“Changing the name of Faneuil Hall is explicitly tied to the city-wide engagement around discussions related to race and racial reconciliation,” said Peterson.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Reuters Global News Summary | Politics

Here is a summary of the news in the world.

Taiwan threatens to take China to WTO in new fruit dispute

Taiwan on Sunday threatened to bring China to the World Trade Organization after Beijing said it would suspend imports of sugar apples and wax apples from the island due to pest concerns, during the last quarrel between the two over the fruit. Relations between Taipei and Beijing, which claim democratically ruled Taiwan as its own territory, are at their lowest in decades, with China increasing political and military pressure for the island to accept its sovereignty.

Explanation – The Canadian Federal Election: What Happened and What Are the Stakes

Canadians go to the polls on Monday in an election that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called two years earlier, seeking to turn public approval for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic into a new four-year term . WHY NOW?

Stored COVID vaccines must be handed over to poorest countries, says former UK prime minister

A vaccine summit hosted by US President Joe Biden this week is expected to come up with a plan to transfer 100 million stored COVID-19 vaccines to poorer countries before they reach their expiration date, said the former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Biden is due to convene a virtual COVID-19 summit on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly on Wednesday, aimed at boosting vaccinations around the world with the aim of ending the pandemic by the end of 2022.

World leaders return to UN with focus on pandemic and climate

World leaders return to the United Nations in New York this week with a focus on stepping up efforts to tackle both climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced them last year to send video statements for the annual gathering. As the coronavirus still rages amid an unfair vaccine rollout, about a third of the 193 UN states plan to send videos again, but presidents, prime ministers and foreign ministers of others are expected get to the United States.

Canadian Trudeau hammers his rival on COVID-19 position on the last day of the campaign

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, crisscrossing the country to deliver a final speech to voters ahead of Monday’s election, said on Sunday that only his Liberals can end the COVID-19 pandemic and accused his main rival of adopting the wrong approach. Opinion polls indicate that the political advantage is with Trudeau, who is stepping up attacks on Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole over the pandemic. Trudeau supports vaccination mandates against O’Toole, who prefers testing to control the public health crisis.

Russia’s ruling pro-Putin party wins majority after crackdown but loses ground

Russia’s ruling party United Russia, which backs President Vladimir Putin, has retained its majority in parliament after three days of elections and a widespread crackdown on critics, despite losing about a fifth of its support, have showed partial results Monday. With 33% of the ballots counted, the Central Election Commission said United Russia won just over 45% of the vote, with its closest rival the Communist Party at around 22%.

Australia defends cancellation of French submarine deal, Macron and Biden discuss

Australia defended on Sunday its decision to drop a multibillion-dollar order for French submarines and opt instead for an alternative deal with the United States and Britain, saying it had signaled its concerns in Paris months ago. Canberra’s move angered Paris, sparking an unprecedented diplomatic crisis that analysts say could cause lasting damage to US alliances with France and Europe. It has also annoyed China, the main rising power in the Indo-Pacific region.

Netanyahu suggests on Facebook that Biden fell asleep upon meeting new Israeli PM

Former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggested in a video posted to Facebook on Sunday that US President Joe Biden fell asleep when he met with new Israeli leader Naftali Bennett last month. A Reuters fact check https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-biden-asleep-idUSL1N2Q00H8 previously debunked the idea that Biden dozed off, after social media users shared a video clip of the US President who they said showed him looking down and falling asleep while Bennett spoke in the Oval Office.

Syrian military leader pays rare visit to Jordan to discuss border security

The Syrian Defense Minister visited Jordan on Sunday to discuss stability at their mutual border, the first such meeting since the Syrian conflict erupted ten years ago when the two neighbors backed opposing factions , officials said. The meeting follows a major military offensive to retake the last rebel stronghold in southern Syria, and after reestablishing control this month over Daraa, a town south of Damascus, as part of a deal brokered by Russia that prevented a full Iranian-led military assault. army units.

France cancels defense meeting with UK over submarine dispute, sources say

France canceled a meeting between Armies Minister Florence Parly and her British counterpart scheduled for this week after Australia canceled a submarine order with Paris in favor of a deal with Washington and London, two sources said. close to the file. Parly personally made the decision to drop the bilateral meeting with British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace, the sources said.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Source link

read more
International headquarters

As leaders meet again at UN, climate and COVID tops list

The UN chief keeps repeating that the world is at “a pivotal moment” and must shift into high gear towards “a greener and safer world”. To do this, leaders must give multilateralism ‘teeth’, starting with joint action to reverse the global failure to fight COVID-19 in 2020 and ensure that 70% of the world’s population is vaccinated. during the first half of 2022.

But as is often the case with the United Nations, it remains to be seen whether the high-level meetings, which start on Monday and end on September 27, actually make progress.

After COVID-19 forced leaders to deliver pre-recorded speeches remotely at last year’s meeting, more than 100 heads of state and government and more than two dozen ministers decided to come to New York this year despite the pandemic. This reflects the unique role of the United Nations as a global public forum for the 193 member countries, whether small or large, weak or powerful.

The annual gathering of assembly world leaders – called the General Debate – has always been a place where presidents, prime ministers, monarchs and other senior officials can discuss local, regional and global concerns in public meetings and functions or private, and during lunches and dinners. . In other words, it creates a space for carrying out the delicate business of face-to-face diplomacy, which is seen as much more productive than online virtual meetings.

Richard Gowan, director of the International Crisis Group at the UN, said the first in-person meeting of the General Assembly since the start of the pandemic – although some 60 leaders have chosen to give pre-recorded speeches – is not only symbolic but an opportunity to “show that the international cooperation is important.”

“For the leaders of the poorest countries, this is also a rare opportunity to speak publicly about the ongoing aftershocks of COVID-19,” he said. “It’s also, frankly, quite fun coming to New York. Many of these leaders are stuck in their capitals.

After four years of Donald Trump representing the United States in meetings, this week Joe Biden will make his first appearance as president when the general debate opens on Tuesday. Gowan said that “the really important question is exactly how he frames relations with China.”

“He won’t be criticizing China as openly as Trump, especially in 2019 and 2020,” Gowan said. “But I think Biden will try to portray China as a country that challenges the rules-based world order and a country that should not be trusted to lead the international system.”

The pandemic is not only something world leaders need to discuss, but also something to deal with on the ground: a key issue ahead of the meetings has been COVID-19 entry requirements for leaders in states – United – and at the UN headquarters itself.

Traditionally, the first speaker after the Secretary General presents his State of the World Report is Brazil. Its president, Jair Bolsonaro, who is not vaccinated, reiterated Thursday that he does not plan to be vaccinated anytime soon. Bolsonaro’s rationale: He had COVID-19 and therefore, he says, he has a high level of antibodies.

Entry into the United States requires a vaccination or recent COVID-19 test, but New York City has a vaccination requirement for convention centers, and it considers the General Assembly Hall – which does not. is technically not American soil – is part of it.

Assembly Speaker Abdulla Shahid said in a letter Thursday that the UN relies only on an honor system. This means that there will be no New York City police to screen people entering the UN headquarters.

Many diplomats say they will keep a close watch on the last scheduled speakers on the last day, September 27, because each has something controversial.

North Korea has just tested new cruise missiles that could deliver nuclear weapons. In Myanmar, generals toppled the democratically elected government in February. The Guinean army overthrew the democratically elected president a month ago. And in Afghanistan, the Taliban seized power on August 15 when the Afghan army did not fight as the last American troops withdrew from the country after 20 years of war.

The credentials of Myanmar’s current ambassador, the country’s ousted democratic government, are challenged by the military junta, but UN officials say the General Assembly’s credentials committee will not meet to hear the protest only after the end of the week’s meetings. And the Taliban have yet to submit a letter challenging the credentials of the previous government’s ambassador.

Among those delivering pre-recorded statements this year are the presidents of Iran, Egypt, Indonesia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. French President Emmanuel Macron was supposed to deliver a pre-recorded statement, but the government has said Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian will now deliver the country’s speech in person on the last day.

France and China have reacted angrily to the surprise announcement by Biden, alongside Australian and British leaders, of an agreement to supply Australia with at least eight nuclear-powered submarines. Australia had signed a contract of at least $ 66 billion for a dozen French conventional diesel-electric submarines and their construction was already underway.

France, the United States’ longest-serving ally, responded by recalling its ambassadors from the United States and Australia on Friday, and the implications of the dispute for Asian and global security will certainly be hot topics in private meetings this week. .

The action begins Monday morning when the Secretary-General brings together world leaders and global pop group BTS to highlight the 17 UN goals for 2030 ranging from eradicating poverty and protecting the planet to achievement. of gender equality, providing every child with a quality education and ensuring a healthy life for all.

An hour later, around 40 world leaders will take part in a closed-door meeting on climate change co-chaired by Guterres and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the run-up to November’s big climate event in Glasgow, Scotland.

“We need urgent progress on money, cars, coal and trees,” British Ambassador to the UN Barbara Woodward said. This means raising $ 100 billion to help vulnerable countries cope with climate change and get countries ambitious emission reduction plans, she said.

Louis Charbonneau, UN director for Human Rights Watch, said world leaders must also deal with human rights crises.

“They must be clear that there can be no status quo with perpetrators of serious rights violations and support UN action which will impose real costs,” he said. “Violent leaders around the world need to know that the world is watching them and that they could one day be held responsible for serious violations. “


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Get addicted to Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop

Drifters co-owner Beckie Clarke finishes brewing coffee in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

There’s a new buzz to pick up in Old Town New Castle.

Combining the West’s love for trout fishing and potent elixirs, Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop truly reflects highland culture at its best.

As the great Colorado River rushes a few hundred yards from its back porch, New Castle’s freshest cup of coffee in town offers both a full coffee bar and, yes, an entire fishing section. fly.



“Who doesn’t love coffee and fly fishing, seriously?” Wonders co-owner Kyla Hemelt, 36, standing behind the rustic cafe’s caramel-colored wooden bar adorned with a school of fish to the side. “Or, who doesn’t like coffee in the river?” “

Housed in a high-ceilinged historic monument in the heart of New Castle’s West Main Street, guests can sip locally brewed coffee while sinking into the welcoming furnishings greeting the front door. Palates can enjoy the Bonfire artisan roaster based in Carbondale. Hemelt said Drifters will soon sell two in-house mixes using this primary supplier.



For every bag sold, 3% of the proceeds will go to Fish For Change, a Denver-based nonprofit that promotes international fly fishing programs. Specifically, the funds will help sponsor a member of the Coal Ridge High School Fly Fishing Club.

Drifters co-owner Kyla Hemelt chats with business partner Beckie Clarke in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Beyond its roasted benefits, Drifters offers so much, like sweet treats, breakfast burritos, and homemade tea, called “Here, Fish, Fish.” Source: Moving Mountains Tea Company in Steamboat Springs.

But uniquely adapting to that ragweed of organic coffee harvested from small farms in the Roaring Fork Valley and high mountain tea is a recreational expertise. Meet 40-year-old co-owner Beckie Clarke, there’s a good chance she’ll serve you a hot cup of Jo before she talks about trout pretty quickly.

Clarke is from Fernie, British Columbia, Canada. There she ran a fly fishing guide outfit for 17 years.

“My heart runs through the waters of these mountains and I know them very intimately,” she said. “Unlike these waters, everything is new and great. It’s just a completely different fishery. It’s pretty epic.

Not surprisingly, Colorado Drifters offers recreational opportunities in harmony with the landscape. Stand-up paddleboard rentals, fly fishing lessons, and qualified fly fishing guides are available for trips along the Colorado River Valley, a world-famous artery that sometimes jumps with 16-inch trout. inches.

Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

To catch these behemoths, the next customer is a sip of fresh coffee to check out the vast collection of Colorado Drifters flies backwards.

“We probably have the most flies in the valley,” Clarke said. “We have minimal space there, but we focused on the flies. You should choose two things that you are really good at when starting a business.

Products available at Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

While fly fishing can be an expensive habit, Colorado Drifters’ selection is all about modesty. All fly rods are priced from $ 80 to $ 150.

“Everything that we have chosen to go to this store has been specially chosen for our community,” said Clarke. “We definitely want tourists, but we want to support local people and families and make things affordable, because rivers are our passion.”

“We are not fancy,” she added. “We are a family.”

Clarke and Hemelt first met during the height of COVID-19. Hemelt, a mother of two, grew up “living the river life” as a native of Gunnison. She started hanging out with Clarke, a mother of three who was passionate about the subject of trout.

One day, the two new friends noticed that something was missing in the restaurants of Old Town New Castle: a coffee shop.

“There was no cafe and there was no fly shop,” Clarke said.

Drifters in downtown New Castle is a combination of cafe and fly shop.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

After spending many late nights texting each other and ultimately making a business plan, Clarke and Hemelt acquired the storefront and began work on the building in May. By the time they opened the doors, “New Castle arrived,” said the owners.

Now, locals have a place to sip an early morning coffee in the mountains and bask in the Colorado Drifters mantra.

“The river brings everything to life, but it’s also what brought us together,” said Hemelt. “It brings people together.”

A wide variety of flies available at the Drifters Coffee and Fly store in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Journalist Ray K. Erku can be contacted at 612-423-5273 or [email protected]


Source link

read more
History organization

What are vector-borne diseases? Here are the symptoms, the story in numbers

As Kerala witnesses a third outbreak of the Nipah virus, Uttar Pradesh is plagued by a mysterious dengue-type fever that has killed at least 100 people, mostly children, in recent weeks.

Mumbai is also seeing an increase in dengue cases compared to last year: 129 in 2020 to 138 in the last eight months of 2021. As for malaria, 3,338 cases have been reported in the financial capital so far. to August 29 of this year. As new cases of dengue and malaria increase amid the Covid-19 pandemic, here’s a look at the top mosquito-borne diseases in numbers.

What are vector-borne diseases? Human diseases caused by parasites, viruses and bacteria transmitted by vectors, according to the World Health Organization. These diseases account for over 17% of all infectious diseases, causing more than seven lakhs of deaths worldwide each year.

Many of these vectors are blood-sucking insects, which take up pathogenic microorganisms during a blood meal from an infected host (human or animal) and later transmit it to a new host. When a vector becomes infectious, it is able to transmit the pathogen for the rest of its life with each subsequent bite / blood meal.

Mosquitoes are just one type of vectors, which cause diseases such as malaria, dengue chikungunya, etc. ), sand flies (sand flies), ticks (Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever), triatomines (Chagas disease) and tsetse (sleeping sickness).

graphic

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always strived to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and have broader political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these difficult times resulting from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and cutting-edge commentary on relevant current issues.
However, we have a demand.

As we fight the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to provide you with more quality content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscriptions to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of providing you with even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital editor


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Syrian opposition calls for renewed focus on political solution

The leader of the Coalition of Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces (SMDK), Salim al-Muslat, on Saturday criticized the international community for focusing only on humanitarian issues and not showing the necessary interest in the political solution process in Syria, which has not progressed.

Al-Muslat, who was elected as chairman of the SMDK at the ordinary general assembly held in Istanbul on July 12, spoke to the Anadolu Agency (AA) about the issues surrounding the work the Constitutional Committee is trying to accomplish, SMDK efforts for the political process, the latest situation in Idlib, the visit of Bashar Assad to Russia and the return of the Syrians to their country.

Regarding the work of the Syrian Constitutional Committee, which has met five times since October 30, 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, as part of the political solution process, al-Muslat said the talks ended in failure. because of the uncompromising attitude. and the frivolity of the Assad regime.

Noting that they met with the United Nations envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen, in Istanbul on September 14, al-Muslat said: “Pedersen has not yet announced a date for the new round of Constitutional Committee talks. and we’ll wait and see what it’ll do. “

Al-Muslat drew attention to the fact that the drafting of the constitution has not yet started, although it has been almost two years since the start of constitutional studies. “No progress can be made because of the regime’s delays. International delegations and Pedersen must act more seriously on this issue,” he said. “The international community has focused on humanitarian issues rather than on the political solution that the Syrian people need.

He stressed that the international community should stand by the side of the Syrian people, adding that the activities of the WDKD contribute to the process of political solution.

“In this process, we have had meetings with many international organizations. As SMDK, we have visited many circles related to the Syrian question. In fact, we met Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu ago a few days (September 9). In addition, we had meetings with officials from other countries, “he said.

Stressing that they attach great importance to a political solution to the civil war which has been going on since March 2011, al-Muslat said: “We will have a visit to New York in the coming days before the sessions of the General Assembly of United Nations. have meetings with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres and officials from other countries. Our pain is great and there is no more room for compliments. We have to move forward in the political process, which is a strategic choice for us. We are seeing a recession in the countries that must act and take responsibility, we do not want to accomplish something and go back. “

Stating that they are still engaged in talks on Syrian territory, al-Muslat said: “Although our headquarters are abroad, we also have centers in Syria. We want to be partners in decision-making. . This means that we meet people intensively, listening to them and working to end their suffering. “

Turkey’s support

Al-Muslat said SMDK institutions go to great lengths to meet the needs of civilians in Syria – in areas under opposition control.

Emphasizing that the Syrian interim government is doing everything in its power to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, al-Muslat said: “Brother Turkey has never denied us its support. The burden has grown heavy. Turkey has always supported us in the field of education, health and safety. “

Referring to the Syrians in Turkey, al-Muslat said: “Since the beginning of the revolution, the words we have heard from our Turkish brothers and their honorable position… have never changed.

Stressing that everyone is in favor of voluntary return to the country, al-Muslat said: “All Syrians want to return to their country if a safe environment is maintained in Syria. No one comes back to die or be detained. We must obey the laws in the countries where we are. We must obey the rules of settlement and not act against them, and no one will harm those who obey them.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, Turkey has supported moderate opposition groups against the Assad regime and has opened its doors to those who had to flee the country for their lives.

Today, Turkey hosts nearly 3.8 million Syrian migrants, more than any other country in the world. The country is also leading humanitarian aid efforts for Syrians in Turkey and in opposition-controlled areas in northern Syria.

“Russia has no respect for the agreements”

Referring to the situation in Idlib, al-Muslat noted that the Assad regime and its supporter Russia continue to violate the ceasefire agreement reached in March 2020.

“There is an agreement between Turkey and Russia in Idlib. However, for months we have been witnessing violations by Russia and the regime by targeting civilians. Russia does not respect any agreement. It is a sensitive subject. There are violations every day. , but the components of the National Army are ready and on alert, ”he said.

In the report released by the Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR) on September 9, he reported that the regime and Russia have launched intense attacks against southern Idlib since June 5. It was reported that a total of 61 civilians, including 33 children and 12 women, were killed in the bombings by Russian forces and the regime from June 5 to September 1.

Regarding the visit of Bashar Assad, the head of the regime in Syria, in Moscow on September 14, al-Muslat said: “The problems that we went through are because of Russia, Iran and the regime. We don’t know the content. of the visit, but maybe there is something on the horizon because there are talks between the United States and Russia in Geneva. We can’t predict anything, we have to see some things.


Source link

read more
History organization

Carl Nassib made history, but also a great game

One of the most significant cultural milestones in recent North American sports history has occurred with as much pomp and circumstance as a shrug.

No openly gay player had ever played in a regular season game in the 102-year history of the NFL until September 13, when Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib entered the field. as he had done in every game of his six years. professional career.

Amid the pageantry of a Monday night football game, Nassib’s barrier-breaking moment overtook the Raiders’ opening ceremony of their new $ 2 billion jet-black stadium to fans. . The greatest recognition of Nassib’s achievement came from some of the participants wearing his # 94 jersey, not some other orchestrated gesture.

On Sunday, he will do it again as the Raiders play against the Steelers, with Nassib and the team making a concerted effort to take what he accomplished in stride and leave it to others to discern and dissect whether a significant cultural change has occurred in the league.

Experts on diversity and inclusion in sport have said that is how it should be.

“I think the fact that it wasn’t a distraction is a very positive sign,” said Richard Lapchick, director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport. “It’s a sign of how much this has been accepted and that there hasn’t been a lot of noise.”

On June 21, Nassib came out as gay in a video posted to his Instagram account, claiming he had internalized his sexuality as a secret for 15 years. The one-minute video, filmed outside his home in West Chester, Pa., Sparked a wave of congratulatory messages on social media, including from his NFL peers, celebrities and the President Biden. Nassib’s jersey became the NFL’s top seller in 24 hours, according to Fanatics, the league’s e-commerce partner.

Before Nassib, 15 players in league history identified as gay or bisexual, according to Outsports, a news site that covers LGBTQ athletes and sports issues. But unlike Nassib, they either announced their sexuality after their playing days were over or had never appeared in a regular season game.

Before the start of the season, Nassib announced that he would donate $ 100,000 to the Trevor Project, a crisis intervention organization for LGBTQ youth. He contacted his organization about two months before his Instagram post to discuss a plan, said Amit Paley, executive director of the Trevor Project. In their conversations, Paley said Nassib wanted to raise awareness of LGBTQ issues rather than just focusing on himself.

Forty percent of the more than 60,000 LGBTQ youth polled in a Trevor Project 2020 survey said they had considered suicide, and 68 percent of those polled in another survey conducted by the organization released this month said they did not participate in sports for their school or community club. for fear of discrimination.

As Nassib’s message spread, traffic to Project Trevor’s website increased by over 350%, and the organization received at least $ 225,000 in pledged donations by the end of this week. .

“I think Carl really didn’t want it to be a big deal, and I hope someday it’s not a big deal when someone goes out,” Paley said in an interview. “But it was clearly a big deal to go out and be the first in this way.”

Things calmed down when training camp started a month later. Nassib’s jersey is no longer at the top of the league’s sales, but it remains in the top five of the Raiders’ players, according to Fanatics.

He declined several interview requests and only spoke publicly once before the first game. Against the Baltimore Ravens, Nassib played 44% of defensive snaps in a rotating role, making three tackles. But in overtime, he collided with Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson for a sack and forced a fumble that the Raiders defense recovered. The offense scored a touchdown to win the game, 33-27, two games later.

Nassib, now in his third team since the Cleveland Browns drafted him in 2016, led the nation with 15.5 sacks at Penn State as a senior and won the Lombardi Award for the country’s best lineman. He tries to remember things from every game, he said, but mostly he relished Monday night’s win.

“It was really special,” Nassib said at a post-match press conference. “I’m really happy that we got the victory on the day that made history a little bit.”

His teammates did not mention Nassib’s historic role in the victory. Coach Jon Gruden only complimented his performance on the pitch. Defensive end Maxx Crosby did it too, saying simply, “Carl is a ball player and I’m proud of the guy.”

ESPN, the network that broadcast the game, also subtly dealt with Nassib’s feat. He released a 28-second video in the third quarter with clips from his Instagram video and a few photos. On an alternate show on ESPN2 featuring retired NFL quarterbacks Peyton Manning and Eli Manning, former NBA player Charles Barkley appeared as a guest and wore Nassib’s jersey.

The cover’s nonchalant demeanor in some ways mimicked the reception of other male professional athletes who played their first games after coming out. Former NBA player Jason Collins received modest applause from the opposing crowd when he entered a game for the Nets in 2014, 10 months after announcing he was gay. But there was no other form of recognition inside the arena, and Collins and his teammates downplayed the media’s importance of the moment.

Robbie Rogers, the first MLS player to appear in a game when he was openly gay, said things looked “normal” in an atmosphere typical of a 2013 Los Angeles Galaxy game.

Nassib said in August that his teammates had supported him since his exit. The Raiders haven’t left any players available for comment, but quarterback Derek Carr, who said his record was just a few points behind Nassib’s, said during training camp that he had seen nothing to dispute it.

“When he walked in I just like to watch, and not a single person from my perspective treated him differently,” Carr said.

Amy Trask, the former Raiders general manager, said this fits in with the tradition of a team that has historically embraced diversity. In 1997, she became the first female NFL general manager Tom Flores, who is of Mexican descent, was the first Latino NFL coach to win a Super Bowl, winning two with the Raiders, over the seasons. 1980 and 1983. The team also drafted Eldridge Dickey, the first black quarterback taken in the first round, in 1968, when the Raiders played in the AFL.

Trask said she didn’t focus on the story she made on her first day or how her coworkers would change the way they act towards her. She’s not surprised at how Nassib and the Raiders fared last week.

“This is an organization that has a history of hiring regardless of race, gender or any other individuality that has no bearing on whether one can do a job,” said Trask said in an interview. “It’s very, very special, from my perspective, that Carl is a Raider.

“He came out and did his job, like everyone would want a player to do their job,” she added.

If he continues to do the job well, said Wayne Mabry, arguably the Raiders’ most recognizable fan, Nassib’s sexuality wouldn’t change the way he views the player. For nearly 30 years, Mabry, nicknamed “The Violator,” attended nearly every Raiders home game dressed as a pirate with black and silver face paint, leather boots and spiked epaulettes.

He said it was a tribute inspired in part by the team’s familiar reputation as the league’s “Bad Boys”. It is irrelevant, he said, that a gay player is part of a team with such a historically gritty perception.

“Warriors come in all shapes and sizes,” said Mabry, 64. “It’s about what you bring to the table. As long as he can help us win, he’s a warrior for me.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

San Antonio – Since 1989, Guide Dogs of Texas, a non-profit guide dog provider, has worked to train and supply guide dogs for the visually impaired in Texas.

This group professionally breeds, trains, and pairs guide dogs with owners statewide. It is a service that brings friendship, freedom and mobility to those who need the help of guide dogs.

Judy St. Clair has been legally blind since 1993, and she has said that only her ability to travel independently with a guide dog has positively impacted her life.

“We trust each other and that’s a factor of trust. With a wand you basically have to know where you’re going, but that’s great because you can still hurt yourself. The dog will see something in advance and protect you, ”said Sainte-Claire.

According to the Guide Dogs of Texas, puppies are placed with volunteer puppy breeders until they are 14 to 16 months old. The San Antonio group said it had been successful in dealing with the future number of guide dogs, even in a pandemic, and needed a “puppy breeder” to support the program.

advertising

Patty McCauley is a puppy breeder who has lived with her dog “nugget” since she was eight weeks old. She said she had played with the idea of ​​volunteering for a while, then decided how much her service would help those in need.

“I just raised a puppy, gave it love, took it out and introduced it to people, the environment and what the average person encounters every day, and I know you give back to someone. ‘a. I think it’s pretty awesome to know that you can help someone on your own, ”said McColly.

According to the group, “No previous experience is required and all training is provided. “

“Puppies are responsible for teaching puppies etiquette and providing them with a social experience for the first year of their life,” a nonprofit said.

Puppies also attend monthly meetings to share ideas and information, work on training techniques, and participate in social gatherings.

advertising

Guide dog instructor Amy Samora said dogs do more than just increase mobility and independence.

“The dog brings a lot of happy faces, and it really encourages people to go to our customers to get involved with them, and it also brings all of this great social relationship.” Said Samora.

Guide dogs are obedient and friendly, but the instructor said it was important not to pet the guide dog. Guide dog owner St. Clair says he will not allow the dog when wearing the harness.

“If I let someone touch her with the harness, she would want to go too far and play. It would be fun, and the general idea of ​​working with a guide dog would be a distraction. But they will continue to focus, ”said St. Clair.

Guide dogs in Texas charge only $ 1 per specially trained dog, but the cost of breeding and training guide dogs can run as high as $ 50,000.

For more information or to register for the program, please visit www.guidedogsoftexas.org, call 210-366-4081 or email @ guidedogsoftexas.org.

advertising

KSAT Details:

San Antonio dog owners share tearful reunion with lab that disappeared 10 years ago

Copyright 2021-KSAT All rights reserved.

San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

Source Link San Antonio Nonprofit Train Provides Guide Dogs to Visually Impaired Texans


Source link

read more
Canadian army

“Belfast” Wins Audience Award at Toronto International Film Festival

The idea of ​​decreased immunity has gained momentum in recent weeks, with some countries using it to justify rolling out third-dose COVID-19 vaccine boosters to their populations. But immunologists say the concept has been largely misunderstood.

While the antibodies – proteins created after infection or vaccination that help prevent future invasions of the pathogen – stabilize over time, experts say this is believed to happen.

And that doesn’t mean we aren’t protected against COVID-19.

Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto, said the term “waning immunity” has given people a false understanding of how the immune system works.

“Waning has this connotation that something is wrong and there isn’t,” she said. “It’s completely normal for the immune system to trigger a response where a ton of antibodies are made and a lot of immune cells are developed. And for now, that sort of thing is taking over.

“But it has to twitch, or you wouldn’t have room for subsequent immune responses.”

Antibody levels rise in the “primary response” phase after vaccination or infection, “when your immune system is loaded and ready to attack,” said Steven Kerfoot, associate professor of immunology at Western University. .

They then decrease from this “emergency phase”, he added. But the memory of the pathogen and the body’s ability to respond to it remains.

Kerfoot said that B cells, which make antibodies, and T cells, which limit the virus’s ability to cause serious damage, continue to work together to prevent serious illness long after a vaccine is given. Although T cells cannot recognize the virus directly, they determine which cells are infected and kill them quickly.

Recent studies have suggested that the T cell response is still robust several months after a COVID-19 vaccination.

“You could get a minor infection… (but) all of those cells are still there, which is why we are still seeing very stable efficacy when it comes to preventing serious illness,” Kerfoot said.

A pre-printed study published this week by Public Health England suggested that the protection against hospitalization and death remains much higher than the protection against infection, even in the elderly.

So the concept of declining immunity depends on whether you measure protection against infection or against serious illness, Kerfoot said.

Ontario reported 43 cases of hospitalizations among those fully vaccinated on Friday, compared to 256 hospitalized unvaccinated infections. There were a total of 795 new cases in the province that day, 582 among those who were not fully vaccinated or whose vaccination status was unknown.

British Columbia, meanwhile, has seen 53 fully vaccinated COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the past two weeks, compared to 318 unvaccinated patients.

“You will hear people say that vaccines are not designed to protect infections, they are designed to prevent serious illness,” Kerfoot said. “I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s the vaccine that’s designed to do either… that’s exactly how the immune system works.”

Moderna this week released actual data suggesting that its vaccine was 96 percent effective in preventing hospitalization, even in the midst of the more transmissible Delta variant, and 87 percent effective in preventing infection – down by compared to the 94 percent efficacy seen in the latest clinical trials. year.

Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said the drop “illustrates the impact of declining immunity and supports the need for a booster to maintain high levels of protection.”

Pfizer-BioNTech backed the same with its own data, and a U.S.-based Food and Drug Administration advisory group voted on Friday to approve third doses for people aged 65 and over or above. risk of serious illness.

However, the panel rejected boosters for the general population, saying the drug company provided little safety data on the additional jabs.

Gommerman said the efficacy data presented by Moderna does not indicate the need for a third dose.

“The fact that it protects 87% against infection is amazing,” she said. “Most vaccines can’t achieve this.”

Bancel said Moderna’s research, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, suggests that a booster dose may also prolong the duration of the immune response by increasing levels of neutralizing antibodies.

But Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti, an infectious disease specialist in Mississauga, Ont., Said looking only at the antibody response is misleading and could be falsely used to justify an endless number of callbacks.

Israel, which has opened third doses to its citizens, recently talked about administering fourth doses in the near future.

“This idea of ​​declining immunity is being exploited and it’s really worrying to see,” Chakrabarti said. “There’s this idea that antibodies mean immunity, and it’s true … but the background level of immunity, enduring T cells, hasn’t been emphasized enough.”

While some experts argue that boosters for the general population are premature, they agree that some people would benefit from a third jab.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has recommended boosters for those who are immunocompromised, who do not develop a robust immune response from a series of two doses.

Other experts have argued that long-term care residents, who were a priority when the rollout began last December, may also soon need a third dose. The English study suggests that immunity may decrease in older groups, but not much, if at all, in those under 65.

Chakrabarti said a decrease in protection among older populations may be due more to “overlapping factors” including their generally weaker immune systems and life situations for people in long-term care. .

“These are the people most at risk of hospitalization,” he said. “Could (the time that has passed after their doses) play a role? Yeah maybe. “

While we still don’t know the duration of the immune response to the COVID-19 vaccination, Gommerman said immune cells typically continue to live in the bone marrow and produce small amounts of antibodies for “decades.”

“And they can be quickly mobilized if they encounter a pathogen,” she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on September 19, 2021.

Melissa Couto Zuber, The Canadian Press


Source link

read more
1 13 14 15 16 17 34
Page 15 of 34