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Prosecute the International Finance Corporation and the Chicago Police’s Kill or Sell Policy

Petitions of the week

Jeffrey Fisher pleads for plaintiffs in jam c. International Finance Corporation. in 2018. (Art Link)

This week, we highlight cert petitions that ask the Supreme Court to consider, among other things, whether the International Finance Corporation is immune from prosecution for its actions regarding the Tata Mundra power plant in Gujarat, India, and whether the Chicago Police Department’s policy of destroying or selling property of arrested persons not recovered after 30 days violates the Fourth or Fifth Amendments.

The Business Activity Exception of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of Cassirer c. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Foundation heard oral argument in a case under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act regarding conflict of law rules. In jam c. International Finance Corporation, the Supreme Court faces another problem under the FSIA in a case that is back before the justices after sending it back to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit earlier in 2019. Jam began in 2015, when farmers and fishermen who live near the Tata Mundra power station in Gujarat, India, along with other petitioners, sued the IFC in federal district court in Washington, DC. The petitioners alleged that the power plant – financed by the IFC and approved from its headquarters in Washington – has “devastated” the local environment and way of life. First Jam case, the Supreme Court ruled that the IFC did not have absolute immunity as an international organization, but only “limited immunity”, meaning that plaintiffs could sue the IFC for claims involving its commercial activity carried on in the United States, or they could sue if the IFC had waived its immunity.

On remand, the DC circuit ruled again that the IFC was immune from suit against the applicants. First, upholding the district court, the appeals court held that the FSIA’s business activity exception did not apply. Since the “construction and operation” of the power plant in India was what “actually harmed” the claimants, their claims were not based on any of IFC’s business activities in the United States. Second, despite the wording of the IFC charter stating that “[a]actions may be brought against it”, the Court of Appeal considered itself “compelled” by the case law to find waivers of immunity only if a waiver “benefited” the organization – and the court estimated that it would not be in this case.

In their motion for judicial review, the petitioners argue that the DC Circuit created a new divided circuit with its approach to the FSIA’s business activity exception and invented its doctrine avoiding waiver in the face of seemingly clear text. waiver of immunity.

The Chicago Police’s Sell or Destroy Policy

In Conyers v. City of Chicago, Illinois, Blake Conyers challenges the Chicago Police Department’s policy of selling or destroying personal property seized from arrestees if the arrestee does not recover it within 30 days. After Chicago police destroyed an earring, bracelet and two cell phones belonging to Conyers (who was in pretrial detention when the 30 days elapsed), Conyers filed suit under the fourth, fifth and 14th amendments. The United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit upheld the district court’s dismissal of Conyers’ claims, in part on the grounds that he had been notified of his need to recover property.

These and others petitions of the week are below:

Conyers v. City of Chicago, Illinois
21-898
Publish: If a municipality may, pursuant to the Fourth and Fifth Amendments and pursuant to an explicit policy, destroy or sell property seized during an inventory search of an arrested person because the arrested person remains in custody awaiting trial for more than 30 days and is unable to recover the property.

Corbeau v. Fontenot
21-970
Publish: if “new” evidence, within the meaning Schlup vs. Delo and McQuiggin v. Perkins, means evidence that was not available at the time of trial or, as broadly construed below, encompasses any evidence, including evidence known to the defendant and/or available with due diligence, not presented at trial .

Idaho vs. Howard
21-975
PublishIf, when officers are lawfully deploying a narcotics detection dog outside a vehicle, and without any instruction, prompting or facilitation from officers, the dog briefly touches the vehicle or sticks its muzzle through a window open, the conduct of the dog constitutes a Fourth Amendment investigation by officers.

Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. v. Hewitt
21-984
Publish: If a supervisor earning more than $200,000 a year is entitled to overtime pay because the stand-alone regulatory exemption set out in 29 CFR § 541.601 remains subject to the detailed requirements of 29 CFR § 541.604 to determine whether highly paid supervisors are exempt from the overtime pay requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

jam c. International Finance Corporation
21-995
Problems: (1) If the business activity exception to the immunity for foreign sovereigns and international organizations under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act authorizes suits where the alleged acts of the defendant giving rise to its liability constitute a commercial activity carried on in the United States, whether or not the conduct of another party more directly caused the damage; and (2) if a treaty provision stipulating that “[a]actions can be brought against [international organization]” waives the immunity of the organization.

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Non profit living

Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: [email protected]

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History organization

Detroit Department of Water and Sewer Announces New Director of Opportunities and Inclusion

Detroit Department of Water and Sewer Announces New Director Position Focused on Opportunity and Inclusion
  • Tiffany Jones is DWSD’s first Director of Opportunities and Inclusion
  • Department makes major commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion for contractors, suppliers and employees
  • DWSD invests approximately $100 million annually in capital projects, in addition to other supplier contracts

DETROIT – The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) announces a groundbreaking commitment to opportunity and inclusion for contractors, suppliers and employees. To support this bold vision, DWSD Director/CEO Gary Brown has selected Tiffany Jones as its first Director of Opportunities and Inclusion beginning this month.

The DWSD Director of Opportunities and Inclusion will develop and execute a work plan around the following areas specific to DWSD, and to support Mayor Mike Duggan’s citywide initiative to create inclusive opportunities for the Detroiters and the minorities. The four main objectives are:

  • Raise awareness and engage with construction and professional services companies with a focus on opportunities and inclusion for minority and Detroit-based contractors;
  • Develop DWSD contract incentives to comply with Mayor Duggan’s Executive Order 2016-1 that requires that at least 51% of hours worked on city contracts over $3 million be performed by Detroit residents ;
  • Implement a workforce development strategy to support the expansion of the lead service line replacement program to replace 5,000 pipes per year; and
  • Create strategies and initiatives around employee diversity and inclusion in promotion opportunities.

“This is a critical time in our history to engage minority and Detroit-based contractors in DWSD projects with more work to come,” Brown said. “With Tiffany’s background in public relations, her ability to engage the public, her in-depth knowledge of DWSD’s operations, and her commitment to diversity and inclusion, she is the optimal choice to lead the organization to improve dramatically opportunities and inclusion.”

Brown added that DWSD is in the midst of a five-year, $500 million capital improvement program to modernize aging water and sewer infrastructure. This program will accelerate in the coming years with additional dollars expected from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which in turn increases opportunities for minority and Detroit-based entrepreneurs.

Tiffany Jones was previously Director of Public Affairs and has held that position since joining DWSD in February 2018. Jones has over 20 years of public relations experience. At DWSD, she oversaw DWSD’s communications strategy, which included guiding messaging and writing standards across the organization. She led the launch of DWSD’s first coordinated advertising campaign, which continues to evolve, and worked with internal groups to develop outreach materials related to construction projects, including the creation of the Lead Service Line Replacement Program package. . For the past two years, she has managed and facilitated DWSD’s annual construction contractor workshops.

Jones received a master’s degree in public relations from Ball State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from North Carolina A&T State University. She is also a graduate of the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Detroit XXXVII Leadership Class.

Bryan Peckinpaugh, previously deputy director of public affairs for the DWSD, has been promoted to director of public affairs.

A person smiling at the camera Description automatically generated with low confidence

About Detroit Water and Sewer
The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) serves more than 230,000 accounts, including a residential population of nearly 700,000. DWSD’s water system consists of more than 2,700 miles of water mains and more than 30,000 fire hydrants, and the combined sewage collection system has nearly 3,000 miles of water pipes. sewer, more than 90,000 cesspools and 16 stormwater green infrastructure projects in the city of Detroit. Beginning in June 2019, DWSD launched a five-year, $500 million program to begin addressing aging infrastructure, including replacing lead service lines. To learn more about DWSD, or to request water services, make payments, register for assistance programs, or report water or sewer emergencies, call DWSD Customer Service at 313-267- 8000, use the Improve Detroit mobile app or visit www.detroitmi. govt/dwsd.

###

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Canadian army

Over 500 Canadian troops at ‘high readiness’ in case of invasion of Ukraine – National

The Canadian commander of a multinational battle group in Latvia says he is working to ensure his troops have enough supplies and can talk to each other, as tensions rise between the NATO military alliance and Russia feed fears of a new war in Europe.

Canada has more than 500 troops in Latvia as part of a larger NATO reassurance mission first launched in 2017 in response to concerns about Russian aggression in Eastern Europe.

The Canadian contingent includes about 350 soldiers mainly from Valcartier, Quebec, who form the core of a 1,000-man NATO battle group stationed at Camp Adazi, about 30 kilometers northeast of Riga, the Latvian capital. .

Read more:

Ukrainian Canadians worried about conflict with Russia: ‘I fear for my family’

This battle group also includes military personnel and equipment from nine nations of the alliance, including Poland, Spain, Italy and the Czech Republic, all of which fall under the command of the lieutenant colonel. Dan Richel.

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In an interview with The Canadian Press on Thursday, Richel said one of his main responsibilities since taking command last month has been to ensure that the various contingents are able to communicate quickly and accurately with each other. others in the field.

“English is a second language for pretty much everyone in the battle group right now,” he said. “They are all NATO countries, obviously, so their tactics are generally the same. We just have to make sure everyone has the same understanding of all the terminology.

Clear communication would be essential in the event of a Russian invasion, which the battlegroup is specifically designed to defend against. It is also important to ensure that the NATO force has fuel, ammunition and other supplies to fight.


Click to play video: ''Don't Panic: ''Ukrainian President Addresses Nation Over Possible Conflict With Russia''







‘Don’t panic’: Ukrainian president addresses nation on possible conflict with Russia


‘Don’t panic’: Ukrainian president addresses nation on possible conflict with Russia

The battle group is designed for conventional warfare, that is, the battle with an army similar to that of Russia. Although Canada’s contribution is primarily infantry with armored vehicles, other partners have contributed tanks, artillery and other equipment.

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“We all come with very different gear, different gear that uses different ammo and requires different support,” Richel said. “It’s a challenge that I think we handle quite well.”

The Canadian commander said the main objective of the battle group was to train and prepare for a possible attack, as it has done since its creation five years ago.

“The battle group itself is already a high-readiness combat unit,” Richel said. “I would say what you see here today is a lot of what you would have seen in the other rotations as well.”

Read more:

Biden predicts Russia will ‘intervene’ in Ukraine and test Western leaders

In addition to those assigned to the battle group, Canada also has about 200 support personnel and a headquarters in Riga responsible for the overall planning and coordination of NATO efforts in Latvia.

Similar battlegroups led by Britain, Germany and the United States were established in Estonia, Lithuania and Poland respectively. The Liberal government has said Canada will lead the mission in Latvia until at least March 2023.

Designed to defend against a Russian invasion, the battlegroups’ small size means they would almost certainly be overwhelmed in a real war. Instead, their primary goal is to deter Russian aggression, with the idea that an attack on one would draw in all of NATO.

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Click to play the video: “Questions remain about the additional assistance the Canadian military can provide to Ukraine”







Questions remain about how much the Canadian military can help Ukraine


Questions remain about how much the Canadian military can help Ukraine

The Russian government has in recent weeks asked the alliance to withdraw all its forces from the region, including those from the Baltic and Poland, after mobilizing around 100,000 troops on the Russia-Ukraine border.

Canada, the United States and other NATO members have rejected the request, sparking growing concerns that an armed conflict between the two sides could start in Ukraine and spread to the rest of Europe. from the east.

Asked Wednesday whether the government would repatriate Canadian troops from Latvia and Ukraine if Russia attacked, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau underscored Canada’s commitment to NATO’s Baltic members.

“We are in Latvia to defend the Baltic states – Latvia, Lithuania and the states of Eastern Europe – against any incursion by Russian forces,” he said in French during a briefing on the COVID-19 in Ottawa. “We will continue the important work that NATO is doing to protect its eastern front.”

© 2022 The Canadian Press

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International headquarters

NCAA changes transgender athlete participation policy amid calls for re-evaluation

The NCAA has changed its policy regarding transgender athletes, it announced Wednesday.

The new approach to allowing transgender athletes will follow a sport-by-sport model similarly adopted by US and international Olympic committees, Sports Illustrated reported. the NCAA said if there was no international federation policy, then “previously established IOC policy criteria would be followed”.

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“We are steadfast in our support of transgender student-athletes and in promoting equity in college sports,” Georgetown University president and NCAA board chairman John DeGioia said Wednesday. in a press release announcing the change.

The new policy takes effect immediately.

NCAA headquarters in Indianapolis on March 12, 2020.
(Associated Press)

TRANS FEMALE ATHLETES HAVE A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE, EVEN AFTER TESTOSTERONE SUPPRESSION, SCIENTISTS SAY

The Board of Governors voted in favor of the new policy because it “preserves opportunities for transgender student-athletes while balancing fairness, inclusion and safety for all who compete,” according to the report.

“It is important that NCAA member schools, conferences and varsity athletes compete in an inclusive, fair, safe and respectful environment and can move forward with a clear understanding of the new policy,” DeGioia added.

The national governing body for each sport will be responsible for determining the participation of transgender athletes. If a sport does not have a national governing body, the policy of the international federation will be enacted, Sports Illustrated reported.

Lia Thomas swims for Penn.

Lia Thomas is swimming for Penn.
(Penn Athletics)

NCAA President Mark Emmert released a statement saying the new policy brings collegiate sports closer to Olympic standards.

“About 80% of US Olympians are current or former college athletes,” Emmert said. “This policy alignment provides consistency and further strengthens the relationship between college sports and the US Olympics.”

MICHAEL PHELPS SAYS LIA THOMAS CONTROVERSY IS ‘VERY COMPLICATED’, CALLS FOR LEVEL PLAYGROUNDS

NCAA rules moved into the national spotlight due to the emergence of Penn’s Lia Thomas. She began breaking Ivy League records with national records in her sights. She was on the men’s team for her first three years, but started on the Quakers women’s team this season after her transition.

Its success this year has drawn criticism for allowing transgender women to compete with biological women. Women’s sports advocates and Penn parents recently spoke out against the NCAA and its rules on the participation of transgender female student-athletes.

The new NCAA policy means swimming athletes will be governed by the policies of USA Swimming, which follow the International Olympic Committee.

The IOC policy updated its transgender participation policy in November 2021 by refraining from focusing on testosterone levels to determine eligibility, according to The Washington Post. The IOC has urged the governing bodies of each individual sport to create the rules while offering assistance.

“Every athlete has the right to participate in sport without discrimination and in a manner that respects their health, safety and dignity,” the updated rules state. “At the same time, the credibility of competitive sport – and in particular high-level sporting competition – depends on a level playing field where no athlete has an unfair or disproportionate advantage over the others.”

Richard Budgett, the IOC’s medical and scientific director, said at the time that it was important to look at broader terms rather than just testosterone levels.

“It’s important that we expand the evidence base. There’s some interesting research that needs to come to fruition, and that will give us a lot more insight into performance, which is the question that’s really key in determining eligibility,” Budgett said.

According to swim swam, an NCAA spokesperson said the “previously established IOC policy criteria” referred to the November 2021 guidance.

The rules previously stated that trans female athletes had to demonstrate serum testosterone levels “below 10 nmol/L for at least 12 months”.

The advice was apparently changed after Laurel Hubbard’s historic appearance at the Olympics.

Thomas finished about two seconds ahead of his opponents with a time of 1:48.73 in the 200 freestyle. She missed setting an NCAA record held by Olympian Missy Franklin, who finished the event in 1:39.10 in 2015. Thomas wasn’t as dominant as she was at the Zippy Invitational in Akron last month.

Lia Thomas of the Pennsylvania Quakers swims in the 500-yard freestyle event during a triple meet against the Yale Bulldogs and the Dartmouth Big Green at Sheerr Pool on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania on January 8, 2022 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.

Lia Thomas of the Pennsylvania Quakers swims in the 500-yard freestyle event during a triple meet against the Yale Bulldogs and the Dartmouth Big Green at Sheerr Pool on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania on January 8, 2022 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.
(Hunter Martin/Getty Images)

She faced a real challenge in the 100 freestyle from Yale’s Iszac Henig, who is making the transition from female to male. Henig clocked 49.57 seconds and Thomas finished behind him with a time of 52.84 seconds.

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Henig, who is from California and has been competing for Yale since 2018, stunned the race’s limited spectators.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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History organization

Carlos Correa hires Scott Boras; Cubs fans are collectively losing their minds

Hard baseball news is hard to come by during MLB’s ongoing lockdown, but free agent shortstop Carlos Correa hit us with a hammer on Tuesday, announcing his hiring of super-agent Scott Boras to represent him in the future.

Almost instantly, Cubs fans waved the white flag on any potential pursuit of Correa once the lockdown ended, despite Chicago being widely seen as a legitimate candidate for the former American League Rookie of the Year. Remember when we thought the Cubs might be able to step in and land Correa on a bargain if his market didn’t grow? Yeah, that’s not gonna happen under Boras’ watch.

As we all know, the Cubs — and their owners — have a complicated history with Boras, who represents former MVP and rookie of the year Kris Bryant, who is also working in free agency for the first time. Of course, Boras and Bryant accused the organization of serving time manipulation in 2015 — although, ultimately, Chicago emerged victorious in the decision.

That doesn’t mean Boras has forgotten, though. Now he represents not only Correa and Bryant, but also Nick Castellanos and Carlos Rodon. Former Cub Dylan Cease, who still has several years left on his own, also transferred his representation to the Boras Corporation this week.

So why the change? I mean, it’s not rocket science. Correa wants to set records with his next contract and Boras has an unrivaled resume in this space. He is ready to make teams feel uncomfortable, play the waiting game and corner the market for his high profile clients.

There are plenty more reasons why Correa would leave his former agency, WME, and MLB Trade Rumors does a solid job of breaking down some of that here.

Chicago Cubs, Scott Boras have a long history of trading barbs

But when it comes to Boras and the Cubs, this development certainly changes the dynamic when it comes to a potential pursuit of Correa. There’s a complicated back-and-forth history between the agent and the team, as recently as 2020, when he singled out the Ricketts family as negotiations raged over a shortened regular season at the following the pandemic.

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Ultimately, I think this all really just raises the bar for what you expect Correa to land in free agency. Boras always makes his guys pay and this will be no exception to that rule. That doesn’t mean the Cubs won’t be on the hunt — but it does mean you can put those dreams of any sort of reduction to bed right now.

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Canadian army

Positive feedback on the first episode of Veteran Hunters

The second installment of the Veteran Hunters television series premiered last night on the Canada Sportsman channel and will continue to air at various times over the coming weeks.

Titled “Pheasants a Plenty,” it captures a two-day pheasant festival for veterans and first responders hosted by the non-profit organization Veterans Hunter at Wessex Game Birds in Carstairs, AB.

It follows the first episode, titled “Anxious for Antelope”, which began airing on December 27.

Veteran Hunters founder Todd Hisey said the show’s sponsors received a positive response to the first episode. This includes Jeff McClounie, COO for Steelhead Ventures, among the show’s sponsors.

Hisey says it’s possible to get other sponsorships for his show and programming. Their fundraising runs from January to Match before the spring hunts begin.

“Any businesses or organizations in Cochrane or Calgary and area that would like to partner with us to provide donations to the organization or consider an opportunity to sponsor the TV show would be greatly appreciated,” Hisey said.

Veteran hunters also attend the Grand Valley Safari Club’s annual fundraising dinner on January 29.

The dinner started almost 20 years ago as an occasion for a few hunters to come together to swap stories and has grown into an evening that attracts over 300 people. Safari Club president Kevin Firkus said he has raised around $250,000 over the years for many worthy causes.

Hisey says the veterans appreciated the opportunity to be among the partners for the evening.

“It’s a great opportunity for the community, ranchers, hunters and outdoor enthusiasts, to come together for an evening and raise money for worthy causes,” says Hisey.

Veteran Hunters will have items up for grabs in the Silent Auction. At their booth, you can learn more about the organization, its fair and meet some of their hunter hosts.

A few tickets are available and can be purchased by contacting Veteran Hunters through their website. here or by emailing Firkus at [email protected]

Hisey had a 22-year career as an officer in the Canadian Army with deployments to Bosnia, Kosovo and Russia. In 2018, and after nearly six years of treatment for PTSD, it was determined that he could no longer work in a traditional role. In January 2019, he launched The Veteran Hunters with a website, podcast, and social media presence to continue giving back to the community and helping fellow soldiers.

Photo/Veteran Hunters

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International headquarters

Capewell appoints Lieutenant General (Rtd) Edward Davis as UK Strategic Director

Davis served 35 years in the naval service as an officer in the Royal Marines. During his distinguished career, he was the 63rd Commanding General of the Royal Marines and Commander of UK Amphibious Forces and Deputy Commander of NATO Land Command Headquarters. Retired from the British Armed Forces at the rank of Lieutenant General, he was transferred to the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and was appointed, by Her Majesty The Queen, 67and Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Gibraltar in January 2016. He completed his term as Gibraltar Governor in February 2020.

Davis spent his early years in the naval service in regimental service in the United Kingdom, the the falkland islands, Cyprus, Norway, and Belize. He commanded a specialized military unit from 2002 to 2004, which included Operation TELIC 1 in Iraq, and later commanded 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines from 2010 to 2011, during which time he deployed to Afghanistan as commander of Task Force Helmand on Operation HERRICK 14. He was appointed 63rd Commanding General of the Royal Marines and Commander of the United Kingdom Amphibious Forces in December 2011. His last appointment to naval service was as Deputy Commander of NATO Land Command Headquarters in Izmir, Turkey, from July 2014 at January 2016.

“Ed’s significant leadership experience as Governor of Gibraltar, his vast expertise in international governance and his long tenure as a military leader with our allies in the United Kingdom are invaluable,” said Gregory Bloom, CEO of Capewell. “Our global team has gained immeasurable strength with his arrival.”

“Faced with the persistent challenges of our ever-changing world,” said Davis, “I particularly relish the opportunity to contribute to Capewell’s strategic ambition to become the premier provider of air and life support systems across the Kingdom. -United, Europe and the Commonwealth. It is an ambition that Capewell will undoubtedly achieve, given its 140 years of successful engineering that is innovative, agile and reliable for mission and life. It is indeed a proud moment for me to join Capewell.”

About Capwell:
Founded in 1881, Capewell is the world’s leading custom engineer and manufacturer of critical air delivery systems and combat water survival solutions for United States government and its partner nations. Capewell’s core mission – to protect people who operate systems in hazardous environments to support national security – continues to this day. Operating from South Windsor, Conn., and Meadows of Dan, Va., the company offers four primary product segments of critical components and systems: aerial and parachute delivery systems, air and marine safety and life support equipment, operator and maintainer training and logistics, and engineering.

SOURCE Capewell

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Non profit living

Volunteers wanted for the local nonprofit’s “Dinner Club” to feed terminally ill patients

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides a community of hope, healing and compassion for those facing serious illness or death with a comfortable living space and family-like care.

Individuals, families and groups are currently providing dinner for residents of Welcome Home of Chattanooga. The love and compassion of the volunteers who provide the meals saves Welcome Home over $10,000 a year and helps residents feel welcome and someone cares.

As Welcome Home expands its reach and services in the Chattanooga area to help more residents, more volunteers will be needed. Volunteers can join the lunch club by contacting welcometochattanooga.org.

The organization’s dinner club allows families, churches and restaurants to bring a meal to residents one evening a month. As a result, almost every night of the month, Welcome Home hosts a Community Dinner which allows residents, staff and volunteers to eat together.

Due to the pandemic, adjustments have been made with the club dinner; many volunteers now drop off dinner or have dinner delivered. General manager Sherry Campbell says the dinner club started organically with a few volunteers providing meals a few nights a week. She says it has now become an essential part of their daily routine.

“We have all experienced loneliness and loss of connection, and it is important to know that we are part of a community larger than ourselves. There are people who care about us and love us. is what our dinner club is all about. We sit around the table, tell life stories, talk about our favorite bands and music, and tease each other. It’s about creating a camaraderie,” Campbell said.

Camaraderie is why volunteer Christie Petty got involved with Welcome Home of Chattanooga four years ago. “My whole family is in Ohio and my kids aren’t home. I’m a very outgoing person and love having the company of the residents,” Petty said.

She heard about the association through a resident who stopped by her work. “I believe God sent him to me. He told me he was staying at Welcome Home and told me everything the staff do for him. Then he told me he was terminally ill. I immediately went to the nonprofit to find a way to help. I don’t know who benefits more from this club, the residents or me.

She provides two meals a month.

Learn more about Welcome Home of Chattanooga:

Welcome Home of Chattanooga is expanding to eventually accommodate ten residents on Quiet Creek Trail. The second phase of the construction project will begin at the end of January. The project will cost around $500,000. If you would like to donate or volunteer to help with the expansion, you can do so online at welcometochattanooga.org.

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