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Read the book by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. “People of color: a memory” a few months ago i read other black history books.

The next title and author of the book is “My slavery and my freedom” by Frederick Douglass, written in 1855. The first chapter makes him live as a little boy, and those years are those when his life was happy. Although he was born into a family of slaves, he still did not feel these terrible factors. He lived with his grandparents and didn’t feel like anyone owned him.

He was born in an agricultural country in eastern Maryland called Tuckahoe. The best feature was the Choptank River that ran through the area.

He tells us about the family he was born into: “Family trees do not flourish among slaves” (p. 30). They usually did not keep family records, so it is not certain what year he was born, but he believes it was 1817. When the slave family had a baby, the slave owners did not note the date of birth for them.

The family member he has fond memories of is his grandmother, Betsy Baily. She caught shad and herring in fishnets, and when the time was right, she planted sweet potatoes for people.

Her grandparents lived in a cabin built of clay, wood and straw. Her grandmother looked after her grandchildren while their mothers (her five daughters) were hired to work remotely. Her mother’s name was Harriet.

He writes that living with his grandmother and grandfather gave him the experience of not feeling like a slave when he was a little boy.

Eventually he learned that his grandparents did not own the hut they lived in, but “Old master” made. That’s what her grandmother used to say. He also began to realize that one day he would no longer live with his grandparents.

He was always worried and sad when he thought about when he would be separated from his grandmother. He was sad now even when she was gone for a short time.

Towards the end of this chapter, he writes that the white boy in the family has more problems than he does. The slave boy goes wild. The owner’s boy – the white boy – has rules to follow, such as using your knife and fork correctly. The slave boy is free from these rules of behavior.

The end of this chapter is a powerful read, for you know that this 7 or 8 year old slave boy will soon no longer feel that freedom.

Chapter II begins with a description of the slave-owning family, which came from Wales to Maryland, and in a few pages we read that Frederick was taken 12 miles to their plantation. When he realizes that he will no longer be with his grandmother, he falls to the ground and cries.

The appendix to the book contains excerpts from speeches Douglass gave throughout his life. He died in 1895.

Here is my first note on “Give me wings: how a choir of former slaves conquered the world”, by Kathy Lowinger, circa 2015: “This book is like an encyclopedia! It’s only 144 pages long, but it’s a complete book, written by a Jewish Canadian. Her family came to Canada from Hungary when she was very young.

One of the book’s many historical stories tells how the Fisk Jubilee Singers started in Tennessee in 1861 with hard times. In two years, they became very well known by performing in the United States, England, the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland. In the recent book by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., “The Black Church”, he writes about the Jubilee Singers.

On a second overseas trip, they performed in England again, as well as Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

They made enough money to save Fisk University, which was about to close for lack of funds.

However, while they traveled by train and boat and stayed in hotels, their wish to be treated fairly like white people was often not honored. These situations got better as they became more famous.

When the Jubilee Singers performed in Hartford, Connecticut, the state governor was in attendance, as was Mark Twain. He was a Jubilee fan and wrote “I think these gentlemen and ladies make eloquent music – and what’s nicely done, they reproduce the real melody of the plantations, and are the only people I’ve ever heard of doing this on a public platform.” (p.97).

The book features many songs written by black people, giving the history of who wrote it and the lyrics. These songs include “Republic battle anthem” “Come down to Moses” and “Rock low, Sweet Chariot.”

Each chapter of this book contains many illustrations. On page 127, readers see the poster for THE ORIGINAL FISK UNIVERSITY JUBILEE SINGERS ORGANIZED OCTOBER 1871.

The next book is “Black girl well read: finding our stories, discovering ourselves”, Edited by Glory Edim, c 2018. There are 22 selections of black writers. I started in the book while reading “Zora and I” by Marita Golden, who has taught writing at numerous universities.

One of the awards she received was for her novel “After”; this award was presented by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. This author co-founded The Zora Neale Hurston / Richard Wright Foundation. These writers have both written about black life in the South – rural areas and small towns.

Marita Golden tells us that Zora’s writings “Offer the world a people who are a symphony, not a disturbing minor key” (p.55). Zora’s father told her about Frederick Douglass before she was old enough to hear about him at school.

We read that for a long time Zora’s writings weren’t well known. The first book she read was “Their eyes looked at God”, and then she read all of her books. Her last paragraph is a thank you to Zora for all the inspiration she has given to black people.

The Hurston book that we have on our shelves is “Traces of dust on the road.”

You can search the history of black subjects on the Plum Creek library system and find many authors and titles, and there is also a wide selection on the Overdrive and Hoopla library digital platforms.

For more information, visit marshalllyonlibrary.org or call 507-537-7003.

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Exfoliators and Scrubs market size 2021

Pune, October 10, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – “The final report will add analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on this industry.”

Global “Exfoliators and scrubs marketThe 2021-2027 research report is a historical overview and in-depth study of the current and future market of the Exfoliators and Scrubs industry. The report represents a basic overview of the Exfoliators and Scrubs market share, competitor segment with a basic introduction of key vendors, major regions, product types and end industries. This report gives a historical overview of Exfoliators and Scrubs market trends, growth, revenue, capacity, cost structure, and key driver analysis. The report further studies and assesses the current landscape of the ever-changing business industry and the present and future effects of COVID-19 on the Exfoliators and Scrubs market.

Get a Sample PDF Report – https://www.industryresearch.biz/enquiry/request-sample/18668732

Scope of Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Report:

Exfoliators and scrubs are used to remove dead skin cells present on the outermost surface of the skin. Exfoliators and scrubs are useful for all skin types. In this report, exfoliators and scrubs are divided into plant type, chemical type, and flower essential oil type.
The major global players in exfoliators and scrubs are Estee Lauder, L’Oréal, Shiseido, Amore Pacific, Avon Products, etc. The world’s top five manufacturers hold a share of over 35%.
China is the largest market, with a share of around 25%, followed by Europe and North America, both of which have a share of around 35%.
In terms of products, Natural Type is the largest segment, with a share of around 85%. And in terms of users, the largest user is female, followed by male.

Market analysis and outlook: Global and U.S. Exfoliators and Scrubs Market
This report focuses on the Global and U.S. Exfoliators and Scrubs Market.
In 2020, the global exfoliators and scrubs market size was US $ 1,621 million and is expected to reach US $ 2,324.3 million by the end of 2027, with a CAGR of 5.3% in 2021-2027 .

TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE COVID-19 IMPACT IS COVERED IN THIS REPORT

The main players in the The exfoliators and scrubs market includes: The research covers the current Exfoliators and Scrubs market size and its growth rates based on 5 year records with business highlights of key players / manufacturers:

  • Estee Lauder
  • L’Oreal
  • P&G
  • Shiseido
  • Unilever
  • Kao
  • Beiersdorf
  • Nation
  • Johnson & johnson
  • LVMH
  • Peaceful Love
  • Clarins
  • Avon Products
  • Chanel
  • Oriflame
  • Christine
  • Natura
  • Boticario

Based on the type of product, This report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, mainly divided into:

  • Natural Type
  • Chemical type

Based on end users / applications, This report focuses on the major application / end-user status and outlook, consumption (sales), market share and growth rate of each application, including:

Inquire Before Buying This Reporthttps://www.industryresearch.biz/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/18668732

The competitive landscape of the Exfoliators and Scrubs market provides details and data information by the vendors. The report offers comprehensive analysis and accurate statistics on the player’s revenue for the period 2016-2021. It also offers a detailed analysis supported by reliable statistics on the incomes (at global and regional level) of the actors for the period 2016-2021. Details included are business description, main business activities, total business revenue and revenue generated from Exfoliators and Scrubs business, Date of entry into the Exfoliators and Scrubs market, product introduction Exfoliators and scrubs, recent developments, etc.

Get sample copy of Exfoliators and Scrubs Market 2021-2027 Report

Some of the key questions this report answered:

  • What is the global (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa) sales value, production value, consumption value, import and export of scrubs and scrubs?
  • Who are the world’s leading manufacturers of the exfoliators and scrubs industry? What is their operational situation (capacity, production, sales, price, cost, gross and turnover)?
  • What are the Exfoliators and Scrubs market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors of the global Exfoliators and Scrubs industry?
  • What application / end user or type of product may be looking for incremental growth prospects? What is the market share for each type and application?
  • What targeted approach and what constraints are there in the Exfoliators and Scrubs market?
  • What are the different sales, marketing and distribution channels in the global industry?

Purchase this report (Price $ 3,900 for a single user license) – https://www.industryresearch.biz/purchase/18668732

Years considered for this report:

  • Historical years: 2016-2020
  • Year of reference : 2020
  • Estimated year: 2021
  • Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Forecast Period: 2021-2027

Along with tables and figures to help analyze the global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market, this research provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of direction and direction for businesses and interested people. tightened by the market.

Some points of the TOC:

1 Study coverage
1.1 Product presentation exfoliators and scrubs
1.2 Market by Type
1.2.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size Growth Rate by Type
1.3 Market by Application
1.3.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size Growth Rate by Application
1.4 Study objectives
1.5 years taken into account

2 Executive summary
2.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size, Estimates and Forecast
2.1.1 Global Sales of Exfoliators and Scrubs 2016-2027
2.1.2 Global Sales of Exfoliators and Scrubs 2016-2027
2.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size by Region: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
2.3 Historical Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size by Region (2016-2021)
2.3.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Retrospective Market Scenario in Sales by Region: 2016-2021
2.3.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs in Revenue Retrospective Market Scenario by Region: 2016-2021
2.4 Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Estimates and Projections by Region (2022-2027)
2.4.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales Forecast by Region (2022-2027)
2.4.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue Forecast by Region (2022-2027)

3 Global Landscape of Exfoliators and Scrubs Competitors by Players
3.1 Global Major Manufacturers of Exfoliators and Scrubs by Sales
3.1.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales by Manufacturer (2016-2021)
3.1.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales Market Share by Manufacturer (2016-2021)
3.2 Global Major Exfoliators and Scrubs Manufacturers by Revenue
3.2.1 Major Exfoliators and Scrubs Manufacturers Covered: Ranking by Revenue
3.2.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue by Manufacturers (2016-2021)
3.2.3 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2016-2021)
3.2.4 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs (CR5 and HHI) Market Concentration Ratio (2016-2021)
3.2.5 The top 10 and top 5 companies in the world by sales of exfoliators and scrubs in 2020
3.2.6 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Share by Business Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
3.3 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Prices by Manufacturers
3.4 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Manufacturing Base Distribution, Product Types
3.4.1 Exfoliators and Scrubs Manufacturers Distribution of Manufacturing Base, Headquarters
3.4.2 Exfoliators and Scrubs Manufacturers Product Type
3.4.3 Date of Entry of International Manufacturers in Exfoliators and Scrubs Market
3.5 Mergers and acquisitions of manufacturers, expansion plans

4 Breakdown data by type (2016-2027)
4.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size by Type (2016-2021)
4.1.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales by Type (2016-2021)
4.1.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue by Type (2016-2021)
4.1.3 Average Sales Price of Exfoliators and Scrubs (ASP) by Type (2016-2021)
4.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size Forecast by Type (2022-2027)
4.2.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales Forecast by Type (2022-2027)
4.2.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue Forecast by Type (2022-2027)
4.2.3 Average Sales Price (ASP) Forecast of Exfoliators and Scrubs by Type (2022-2027)

5 breakdown data by application (2016-2027)
5.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size by Application (2016-2021)
5.1.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales by Application (2016-2021)
5.1.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue by Application (2016-2021)
5.1.3 Exfoliators and Scrubs Price by Application (2016-2021)
5.2 Exfoliators and Scrubs Market Size Forecast by Application (2022-2027)
5.2.1 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Sales Forecast by Application (2022-2027)
5.2.2 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Revenue Forecast by Application (2022-2027)
5.2.3 Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Price Forecast by Application (2022-2027)
……………………
7 North America
8 Asia-Pacific
9 Europe
10 Latin America
11 Middle East and Africa

12 company profiles
13 Analysis of market opportunities, challenges, risks and influencing factors
14 Analysis of the value chain and sales channels
15 Research results and conclusion
16 Annex

Detailed Table of Contents of Global Exfoliators and Scrubs Market @ https://www.industryresearch.biz/TOC/18668732

About Us:

The market is changing rapidly with the continued expansion of the industry. Advances in technology have provided today’s businesses with multifaceted benefits resulting in daily economic changes. Thus, it is very important for a company to understand the patterns of market movements in order to better develop a strategy. An effective strategy gives companies a head start in planning and an advantage over competitors. Industry research is a credible source for obtaining market reports that will give you the head start your business needs.


        


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San Francisco housing complex gives victims of domestic violence a fresh start

Tucked away on her Chesterfield sofa, her power wheelchair close at hand, Rosemary Dyer examined the glittering peacock figures she had purchased on her first solo trip to San Francisco’s Chinatown after her release from prison, and admired the bright tablecloth with silk flowers in her new living room.

Dyer, an effervescent woman with a mischievous sense of humor, brought these and other prized possessions to Home Free, a new transitional apartment complex in San Francisco. It was designed for women who have been jailed for killing their abusive partner or being at a crime scene coerced by an abusive spouse or boyfriend. Dyer was convicted of murder and sentenced to life without parole in 1988 for the shooting death in 1985 of her eight-year-old husband, who abused and tortured her, at a time when expert testimony related to domestic violence and its effects were not permitted. in court in most states.

The insidious villainy that defined her life included being repeatedly beaten and sodomized with a loaded handgun. Her husband had dug a grave in the backyard, saying he intended to bury her alive.

Home Free – where Governor Gavin Newsom’s 2020 Dyer’s Switch is proudly hung on the wall – was created by Five Keys Schools and Programs, a statewide nonprofit that provides education, training professional, therapeutic programs and housing for inmates and new releases. The five-bedroom, two-bedroom apartment complex is the result of years of advocacy by survivors of intimate partner violence and the organizations that work with them. Their efforts have enabled women like Dyer to secure their release by pardon or by retroactively presenting evidence of their abuse to the state parole board or the courts.

“The fact that women who have suffered unspeakable violence against them have not been allowed to provide evidence of the abuse is the epitome of injustice,” said Sunny Schwartz, founder of Five Keys. “We are committed to creating a vibrant, dignified and safe home, a place that says ‘you are worth it.’ “

Previous transitional housing options for women were largely limited to those dealing with substance abuse. Home Free, on Treasure Island, a former naval base in the San Francisco Bay area, was forged during the pandemic last year with a tight start-up budget of $ 750,000, including staff. The once grimy apartments have been renovated with the help of nearly 100 volunteers – architects and landscapers, flooring and cabinet installers, plumbers, transporters, electricians and urban construction apprentices. They all gathered on this somewhat bizarre island originally built for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exhibition.

Interior design students at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco dedicated a semester to the project, joining mini-charettes on Zoom with Irving A. Gonzales of G7 Architects. They also reflected with the women, whose desires included full-length mirrors (they had been denied in prison to monitor their form for years).

“We wanted color! said Dyer, who visited the construction site while still in temporary accommodation. She and others had a particular aversion to gray, a shade associated with bunks and metal prison lockers.

A 69-year-old cancer survivor with congestive heart failure, Dyer has been using a wheelchair since she injured her hip in prison. A huge pirate flag – a nod to the Treasure Island theme – greets visitors as they arrive. Her accessible apartment adjoins a patio where she grows pots of tomatoes and radishes.

The landscape itself was designed by Hyunch Sung of the Mithun firm, who chose 10 different tree species. (Because the soil on Treasure Island is contaminated with industrial chemicals, the trees are planted in brightly colored containers.) Sung said she approached her work there as if designing for high-end clients. . “The idea of ​​beauty is underestimated for disadvantaged communities,” she said.

Nilda Palacios, 38, who lives upstairs, said it was “emotionally moving” to join the resort. She grew up with a history of abuse: she was assaulted as a child by an uncle and a stepfather, then raped at the age of 15 by a high school teacher. The teacher’s stressful ordeal made her dependent on drugs and alcohol (“I was trying to sleep my life,” she says). Palacios became distraught and suicidal. When a beggar cornered her one day, she said, she thought he was planning to attack her and “went on a rampage”, strangling her. She was convicted of second degree murder. Incarcerated for 17 years, she benefited from therapists in prison who helped her understand “how the depth of my crime relates to my story,” she said. “I confused someone who was not a threat for someone who was.”

Palacios was paroled. She benefited from a broader vision for Home Free, which now welcomes women like her, whose crimes were directly linked to their abuse.

Upon moving in, she was “shocked” at the prospect of a private room after years of sharing an 8 x 10 foot cell and cramming all her things into a six cubic foot box, with, as one inmate put it, current. , “your panties against noodles and peanut butter.”

“No way, is this my room?” Palacios recalled. “It felt like a real house to me.”

The idea for Home Free arose during a conversation between Schwartz, its founder, and the state treasurer of California, Fiona Ma, then the deputy of the state. Ma’s legislation, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2012, allowed women who had experienced domestic violence and been convicted of violent crimes related to their abuse the opportunity to have their cases heard again using Women’s Syndrome. beaten (as it was called then) as a defense. The law also gave them the right to present evidence of abuse by intimate partners during the parole process. It applied to persons convicted before August 1996.

The number of Rosemary Dyers still behind bars is unknown. About 12,000 women are currently incarcerated for homicide nationwide, said Debbie Mukamal, executive director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center at Stanford Law School and director of the Regilla Project, a three-year effort to study the frequency with which women in the United States are jailed for killing their attackers. Small studies, including one in Canada, suggest that 65% of women serving a life sentence for the murder of their intimate partner had been assaulted by them before the offense. The link between abuse and violent crime was highlighted by grim statistics in a 1999 US Department of Justice report showing that a quarter to a third of incarcerated women had been abused as minors and only a quarter to almost a half in adulthood.

Despite increased public awareness, “there are still a large number of criminal lawyers who do not understand how intimate partner violence creates the context for a crime,” said Leigh Goodmark, director of the gender-based violence clinic at the University of Maryland School of Law.

In New York State, the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act, enacted in 2019, was put to the test in the high-profile case of Nicole Addimando, a young mother of two in Poughkeepsie who shot and killed her baby friend and his father. children in 2017 after years of heartbreaking abuse (the case is dramatically captured in the documentary film “And So I Stayed.”)

Sentenced to 19 years in life for second degree murder, Addimando was entitled to a subsequent hearing under the law, where her allegations of abuse could be factored into a reduced sentence. The county court judge dismissed the allegations, saying she “had been given the opportunity to leave her attacker safely.” In July, the appeals division of the state Supreme Court overturned the decision, reducing the length of Ms. Addimando’s detention to 7.5 years.

For Kate Mogulescu, associate professor at Brooklyn Law School and director of its Survivors Justice Project, the case illustrates “the impossible burdens we place on survivors to prove their victimization.” Women are scrutinized by the courts in a very different way than men, she added. “With women, they are a bad mother, or promiscuous. The tropes are trotted on women and the punishments reflect this. However, so far 16 women have been punished in New York.

By far the most common reason that women who have been abused by intimate partners end up in prison are accomplice laws, in which a victim is forced to be at the scene of an abuser’s violence, like driving the getaway car, said Colby Lenz, co-founder of Survived and Punished, a national rights organization.

This was the case with Tammy Cooper Garvin, a victim of sex trafficking at the age of 14 and jailed for 28 years for being in the car while her pimp murdered a client. Her sentence was commuted and she was hired by Home Free as a residential coordinator.

Another advocate – and a guiding force behind the founding of Home Free – is another survivor named Brenda Clubine, who started a weekly support group at the California Institution for Women. Some 72 women quickly joined. Dyer was one of the original members, but until Clubine encouraged her, she was so terrified of life that she could barely speak.

Clubine herself had suffered years of abuse, including broken bones and stab wounds, by her husband, a former police detective. She hit her head with a bottle of wine and he died of blunt trauma. She served 26 years of a 16 life sentence. Her fierce retelling of the stories of the women in the prison group – which she sent to state lawmakers and governors – led to public hearings and the 2009 documentary “Sin by Silence,” which in turn inspired California laws.

Clubine’s close friendship with Dyer continued and is essential to Dyer’s rebounding confidence. At Home Free, Dyer now delights in making homemade noodles with chicken from his grandmother’s recipe. Clubine, his BFF, found that a safe and strengthening place for his “sisters” was long overdue. “I can’t say how full my heart feels that he’s available to them now,” she said.


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Vaccines, Child Care, Canadian Thanksgiving: Your Weekend Briefing

(Want to receive this briefing by email? Here is the register.)

Here are the best stories of the week and a glimpse into the future.

1. Moderna’s vaccine appears to be the world’s best defense against Covid. Poor countries struggle to get it.

Moderna sells almost all of its Covid vaccine – the only product it sells – to rich countries, generating billions in profits. About a million doses went to countries the World Bank classifies as low-income, compared to 8.4 million Pfizer doses and about 25 million Johnson & Johnson single-injection doses.

Most middle-income countries that have deals with Moderna have not received any doses. Thailand and Colombia pay a premium. The Biden administration has pressured the company to make its vaccine, which was developed with support from the US government, more widely available.

The development of Covid vaccines means that more effective influenza vaccines could emerge, using the same technology. In the meantime, public experts say it is very important to get the flu shot this year to avoid “twindemia”.

2. As Congress debates President Biden’s $ 3.5 trillion social policy bill, we took a close look at one key element: child care.

The bill would cap families’ spending on child care at 7% of their income, offer large subsidies to day care centers and force centers to increase salaries in the hope of improving the quality of teachers. The grants “would be the biggest investment in the history of child care,” said one expert.

Democrats describe the problem as a fundamental market failure – it simply costs more to provide care than many families can afford. Republicans say the plan is unaffordable and smacks of socialism. As Democrats consider slashing the bill to $ 2 trillion, a proposal to limit programs to the poor has reignited debate about the government itself.


3. Most abortions in Texas are banned again after a federal appeals panel reinstated the restrictive law.

The decision came two days after a lower court blocked the law in a case brought by the Biden administration. Many vendors expected the Conservative Fifth Circuit to side with Texas. The panel called on the administration to respond by Tuesday. While at least six Texas clinics had started performing the procedure beyond the limits of the new law over the past week, most of the state’s roughly two dozen providers had chosen not to. .

4. Taiwan is at the heart of the American-Chinese tensions, with the potential to ignite military conflict and reshape the regional order.

China’s growing military might made it possible to conquer Taiwan. The island’s readiness has wilted; China sent 56 fighter jets to test its besieged air defenses on Monday. The United States has seen its military dominance in Asia erode.

Few people believe that a war is inevitable. The economic and diplomatic aftershocks would be astounding for China. But China is now acting with growing confidence, in part because many officials, including Xi, believe US power has faltered.

American failures with the Covid-19 pandemic and its political upheavals have reinforced these views. In war games since at least 2018, American “blue” teams have repeatedly lost to a “red” team representing a hypothetical Chinese force.

5. Is Big Tech the Next Big Tobacco?

The testimony of a Facebook whistleblower last week generated an unusual bipartisan agreement that it was time for regulations to put the brakes on the tech industry. But if what’s facing Big Tech is anything like what happened to Big Tobacco in the 1990s, what lies ahead will likely be a multi-year struggle.

Lawmakers are weighing proposals, such as creating a new federal agency dedicated to overseeing the industry or overhauling laws so companies can be held accountable for amplifying damaging rhetoric. But the industry has built the largest army of lobbyists in Washington.

Our tech reporter also watched on how two recent high-profile implosions – those of Ozy Media and Theranos – are a reminder of how risky the bet of start-ups is and how often companies distort the truth.

6. Erika Girardi has become famous for her lavish lifestyle. Then her husband’s law firm was accused of embezzling millions of dollars. What has happened since is drama made for television.

Girardi, an actor in “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills”, is married to Tom Girardi, who helped win the lawsuit that made Erin Brockovich famous. He is accused of robbing vulnerable customers – including victims and relatives of those killed in the Lion Air plane crash in 2018 in Indonesia – to support their extravagant tastes. She, too, has been cited in half a dozen civil lawsuits and seems to be enjoying the attention.


7. How can you make up for 52 years of lost time in 11 days?

After years of battling cancer, Sam Anthony was running out of time. Before he died this summer, he found the courage to post a letter he had long been afraid to send, to a man he had never met: his biological father. A colleague from the National Archives helped find him.

Sam’s father, Craig Allen, had lost all hope of finding his son. After receiving the letter, father and son spent Sam’s last days together. “It was a combination of the saddest moments of my life, but also the proudest,” Craig said.


8. Phoebe Robinson is a comic, but a better description could be the boss.

Over the past few years, Robinson has grown from a pushy stand-up to a mini-mogul with a staff, a production company, a publishing imprint, TV deals, and even an intro to leadership she wrote. after noting the lack of views of black women. in business books. She writes, “Where’s ‘Lean In’ for us? “

In other news from the entertainment empire, what happens when Balenciaga collaborates with “The Simpsons” to present its latest collection? Springfield meets Paris in a delicious 10-minute episode.


9. If you are frustrated with trying to grow figs in a cold climate, you are not alone.

Our gardening expert, Margaret Roach, spoke to another expert about how to make your tree fruitful. The simple way to grow figs is in a pot, and that requires proper size and proper protection. A sunny location during the outdoor growing season and good drainage is also necessary.

Ahead of Canadian Thanksgiving tomorrow, our correspondent wrote a tribute to a different fruit tree: the McIntosh apple. The crunchy, tangy apple was discovered by John McIntosh in 1811, just south of Ottawa. If you feast on tomorrow, here are 11 delicious last minute recipes.


Have a fruitful week.


David Poller photos compiled for this briefing.

Your weekend briefing is posted Sunday at 6:30 a.m. EST.

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History organization

Tensions persist between the legacy of Columbus and the natives

Monday’s federal holiday dedicated to Christopher Columbus highlights the lingering rift between those who view the Explorer as a representative of Italian-American history and others horrified by an annual tribute that ignores the indigenous peoples whose lives and culture were forever changed by colonialism.

Spurred on by national calls for racial fairness, communities across the United States have taken a closer look at Columbus’ legacy in recent years – by associating or replacing it with Indigenous Peoples Day.

On Friday, President Joe Biden issued the first presidential proclamation of “Indigenous Peoples Day,” the most important impetus to date in efforts to refocus the federal holiday celebrating Columbus.

But activists, including members of Native American tribes, said the end of the official Columbus name vacation was blocked by politicians and organizations focusing on Italian-American heritage.

“The opposition tried to portray Columbus as a benevolent man, in the same way that white supremacists painted Robert E. Lee,” said Les Begay, a member of the Diné nation and co-founder of the Indigenous Peoples’ Day Coalition of Illinois, referring to the Civil War general who led the Confederate Army.

The arrival of Columbus began centuries of exploration and colonization by European nations, bringing violence, disease and other suffering to indigenous peoples already living in the Western Hemisphere.

“Failure to honor indigenous peoples on this day continues to erase our history, our contributions and the fact that we were the original inhabitants of this country,” Begay said.

Across the country, the tension, over the two public holidays, has been playing out since the early 1990s. Debates over monuments and statues of the Italian explorer are treading on similar ground, as in Philadelphia where the city has placed a box on a statue of Columbus last year following the murder of George Floyd, a black man, by a white Minneapolis policeman. Protesters opposing racial injustice and police brutality against people of color rallied for months in the summer of 2020.

Philadelphia attorney George Bochetto, who fought against Democratic Mayor Jim Kenney’s administration to uncover the statue, said on Saturday many viewed the efforts to remove it as an attack on Italian-American heritage.

Kenney previously signed an executive order changing the city’s annual Columbus Day celebration to Indigenous Peoples Day. Monday will be the city’s first public holiday under the new name.

“We have a mayor who is doing all he can to attack the Italian-American community, including canceling his parade, removing statues, changing Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day by decree,” said Bochetto .

Kenney’s spokesperson Kevin Lessard said the statue should remain wrapped “in the best interest and public safety of all Philadelphians.”

In 2016, Lincoln, Nebraska joined other cities in adding Indigenous Peoples Day to the calendar on the same date as Columbus Day. Monday’s events will focus on the most recent addition, including the unveiling of a statue in honor of the first Native American physician, Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte.

Some believe that a split day causes even more harm. Activists are planning a small protest outside the Robert V. Denney Federal Building, calling for an outright end to the holidays on behalf of Columbus at all levels of government.

“It is patently absurd to honor indigenous peoples and the man who tortured and murdered their ancestors,” said Jackson Meredith, an organizer. “As far as we are concerned, we will continue to protest until Columbus Day is abolished.”

In New York City, the annual Columbus Day Parade returns after a one-year in-person absence attributed to the coronavirus pandemic. The parade is touted by some as the biggest Columbus Day celebration in the world.

In May, Italian-American activists complained after the Board of Education removed Columbus Day from the New York City school calendar, replacing it with “Indigenous Peoples Day”. Following the outcry, schools changed the designation to: “Italian Heritage Day / Indigenous Peoples Day”.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has said he supports the compromise.

“We must honor this day as a day to recognize the contributions of all Italian Americans, so of course the day should not have been changed arbitrarily,” said de Blasio.

The annual Columbus Day Parade in Chicago also returns on Monday after the pandemic forced the event to be canceled in 2020 which draws 20,000 people. It’s a vivid reminder of the ongoing fight for three statues of Columbus, still in storage by the city after protesters targeted them in the summer of 2020.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot in July 2020 ordered the statues to be removed and said the protests endangered protesters and police.

She then created a committee to examine the city’s monuments, including the fate of the monuments of Columbus. No plan has been publicly announced, but the Joint Italian-American Civic Committee planning the Columbus Day parade this summer has sued the city’s park district, demanding it be restored.

Ron Onesti, the organization’s chairman, said the parade usually attracts protesters and expects that on Monday as well. He sees the holidays, parade, and statues as a celebration of the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States, not just to Columbus.

“The result I am looking for is (for) our traditions to be respected and conversations to continue,” Onesti said on Saturday. “Each plaque that accompanies a statue indicates that it recognizes the contributions of the Italian community. So people have to figure out why it’s there, and then let’s sit down and figure out where to go from here.

In 2017, Illinois designated the last Monday in September as Indigenous Peoples Day, but maintained Columbus Day as the second Monday in October. A proposal to replace Columbus Day tabled this year has not received any action.

Chicago public schools in 2020 voted to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day, sparking outrage from several aldermen and Italian-American groups. The city’s public holiday calendar still lists Columbus Day.

Begay, the advocate for Indigenous Peoples Day, said the organization decided to focus on changing Columbus Day in Cook County first, hoping it would be an easier route than convincing officials state or Chicago. But so far, members of the county’s board of directors have not sided with the proposal.

“Why are more than 500 years still forgotten? Said Bégay. “Why don’t we have this one day to recognize these horrific atrocities committed against native people? “

___

Associated Press Reporter Lawrence Neumeister in New York contributed to this report.


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International headquarters

OECD hails ‘victory’ as dissenters join global tax reform

“HISTORICAL MOMENT”:
A 15% global corporate tax set to go into effect in 2023, but Oxfam called it a capitulation to tax havens like Ireland

A global push to enact a minimum international tax on large corporations came closer to reality on Friday as one of the last holdouts, Hungary, agreed to join a reform that now has 136 countries.

The agreement brokered by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which sets a global tax of 15%, aims to prevent international companies from reducing their tax bills by registering in countries with low rates.

“Today’s agreement will make our international tax agreements fairer and more efficient,” said OECD Secretary General Mathias Cormann. “This is a great victory for effective and balanced multilateralism.

Photo: AP

Hungary’s announcement came a day after another key opponent, Ireland – whose low tax rate attracted Apple Inc and Alphabet Inc’s Google – caved in and agreed to join the global effort.

Along with Hungary, 136 countries representing 90% of global GDP have now signed on, the Paris-based OECD said.

Estonia also joined the reform on Thursday.

The OECD has said Kenya, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and Pakistan are the latest holdouts among the 140 countries that negotiated the tax.

Pakistan was on a previous list of signatories.

The organization said the countries aim to sign a multilateral convention next year, with a view to implementing the reform in 2023.

The years-long talks were given a boost earlier this year when the administration of US President Joe Biden backed a global minimum tax rate of at least 15%.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made reforms more urgent as countries need new sources of revenue to pay for the huge stimulus packages that were rolled out during last year’s global recession.

“Today’s agreement represents a unique achievement for economic diplomacy,” US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a statement.

“Since this morning, almost the entire world economy has decided to end the race to the bottom in corporate taxation,” Yellen said.

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, called it a “historic moment”, saying that “all companies must pay their fair share”.

The Brussels IT and communications industry association welcomed the agreement.

It was a step “to ensure that international tax rules reflect today’s global economy,” association vice-president Christian Borggreen said in a statement. “This is an important step towards greater fairness and certainty in the global tax system. “

However, the Oxfam charity was scathing.

“Today’s tax deal was about ending tax havens for good. Instead, it was written by them, ”said Susana Ruiz, Oxfam tax policy expert. “This deal is a shameful and dangerous surrender to the low-tax model of nations like Ireland.”

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Canadian army

Newport D-Day veteran Lyndon Sheedy’s medals have gone home

The last wish of a decorated Newport D-Day veteran has been granted – after his medals were returned to Wales from his home in Canada.

Lyndon Sheedy, CStJ, CD, ADC from Crindau had a decorated career in the Armed Forces and regularly returned from his home in Canada to Newport and France to pay his respects on D-Day.

Lyndon Sheedy in his South Wales Borderers uniform

Mr Sheedy passed away at the age of 96 on August 14, 2020 and wanted his medals returned to the Royal Regiment of Wales Museum in Brecon – formerly the South Wales Borderers Museum.

On September 30, 2021, his sister Joan Reynolds – herself a veteran who served in the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) attached to the Royal Artillery on anti-aircraft guns – and Lord Lieutenant of Gwent, Brigadier Robert Aitken were awarded his military and civilian medals. and awards as well as two photos to the museum’s curator, Amanda Rosewarne. They were joined by Mrs. Reynolds’ friends Ivan and Sue Beatty.

South Wales Argus: Lord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitken and Joan Reynolds MBE presenting Royal Regiment of Wales Museum curator Amanda Rosemarme with Lyndon Sheedy medalsLord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitken and Joan Reynolds MBE presenting Royal Regiment of Wales museum curator Amanda Rosemarme with Lyndon Sheedy medals

Mr. Sheedy was born in Crindau on July 31, 1924 and he joined the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers in 1942 and was assigned to A Company to secure the residence of Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

On D-Day – June 6, 1944 – he was posted to Normandy with the 2nd Battalion and the Gloucesters and Essex regiments. At 7:30 am, he landed on the ‘Gold’ beach in Normandy. He was then injured and returned home for treatment.

He then served with the 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers in Cyprus, Gaza and Palestine during the uprising. He also served in Sudan and Eritrea.

South Wales Argus: Lord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitkin and Joan Reynolds with medals and photographs of Lyndon Sheedy at the Royal Regiment of Wales MuseumLord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitkin and Joan Reynolds with the medals and photographs of Lyndon Sheedy at the Royal Regiment of Wales Museum

Mr. Sheedy spent the last period of his career in the British Army as a permanent staff instructor at the Brecon Regimental Depot. He left the British Army in 1952 with the rank of sergeant.

In 1953, he enlisted in the Canadian Army as a corporal and was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Guard Battalion. The following year, he was promoted to sergeant. In 1956, he was posted to NATO, West Germany, as a platoon commander and, upon his return to Canada, he performed field garrison and ceremonial guard duties on the Parliament Hill.

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He was promoted to warrant officer in 1965 and served as a company quartermaster. He then returned to NATO in West Germany to the brigade headquarters where he served as an administrative adjutant.

Mr. Sheedy returned to Canada at Bordon, Ontario, and served as the Senior Warrant Officer in the Infantry Basic Training Division. In 1972, he transferred to the Combat Arms School as an instructor, then to the Mechanized Commando where he was a platoon warrant officer.

In 1974, he was appointed lieutenant and requested leave from the Canadian Forces. As a civilian, he was later employed by the United States Embassy in the Department of State Administration on General Services. His role was to coordinate and oversee the placement of staff during presidential visits, the Secretary of State and other VIPs.

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy in his Order of St. John uniformLyndon Sheedy in his Order of St. John uniform

He was awarded the United States Government Medal of Citation for his outstanding performance and upon his retirement in July 1989 he was awarded a Certificate for Dedicated Service to the Government of the United States of America by the United States Ambassador in Canada, Edward N. Ney.

After his retirement, Mr. Sheedy devoted his time to the community, spending 17 years with the Order of St. John – where he was described as personifying the principles of the Order and was recognized as a “rare person who has shown leadership and determination extremely well. of the highest level. ‘

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy's medalsLyndon Sheedy’s medals

Mr. Sheedy has received a number of accolades from various organizations and nations for his service. He was awarded the French National Order of the Legion of Honor – the highest national order in France. It was presented to him by the French Ambassador to Canada at the French Embassy in Ottawa.

He also received a medal from the mayor of Caen in France – a place he visited every year. This presentation was made in her house in Newport by Madame Marie Lambert-Prou.

He was elevated to the rank of Officer and then Commanding Officer in 1983 during ceremonies at Christchurch Cathedral in Ottawa. In July 1991, he was appointed aide-de-camp to the Governor General.

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy's military and civilian medalsLyndon Sheedy Military and Civilian Medals

For 32 years, he took care of his wife Jean who suffered from MS. He also took care of another lady who lived in the same apartment complex for 11 years.

Mr. Sheedy not only had a long and exceptional career in the military and government, but he was also an author and artist. He painted landscapes and wrote about his life and experiences in his book Under five flags, the Odyssey of a soldier.


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History organization

Blue Ridge Hunt opening meets return at Carter Hall | Winchester Star

MILL WOOD – A long-standing tradition in Clarke County is back.

On October 30, the Blue Ridge Hunt will hold their opening meet for the 2021 season at Carter Hall, returning for the first time in about 20 years.

The new owners of the historic estate allow the hunt to re-use the land for the annual event.

“It’s wonderful that … the new owners want the tradition to continue,” said Anne McIntosh, one of the two masters of the hunt. The other is Jeffrey LeHew.

Project HOPE, a nonprofit health and humanitarian organization, occupied the 87-acre estate off Bishop Meade Road (Va. 255) for four decades before consolidating its operations in the Washington, DC area.

The estate was recently purchased by Carter Hall Estate LLC – comprised of Langdon Greenhalgh; her brother, Blakley Greehalgh, and their mother, Beverley Byrd – for $ 5.75 million. Clarke County tax rolls show the property was valued at $ 5,764,400.

Carter Hall is listed on both the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register.

Plans are for the estate to become a country inn and conference center, according to Langdon Greenhalgh.

“We value and respect the history of Clarke County and the unique role the Blue Ridge Hunt has in it,” he said, explaining why the family invited him to return.

In addition, “we are working to make Carter Hall more accessible to the community,” such as special events, he added.

Langdon Greenhalgh mentioned that his grandmother, Sybilla “Billy” Greenhalgh, and stepmother, Judy Greenhalgh, were former masters of the hunt.

Founded in 1888, the Blue Ridge Hunt has approximately 80 members who enjoy fox hunting.

The Hunt began holding its opening meetings at Carter Hall each year in the mid-1930s. Then, around 2000, Project Hope did not invite the Hunt to return to the field. Cinira Baldi, the organization’s development and communications manager, could not be reached for comment on Friday afternoon why.

The opening meetings were then moved to the historic Long Branch House and Farm, where the Hunt holds its annual Thanksgiving events. He will be holding one this year.

But Hunt wanted to return their opening meetings to Carter Hall to revive a historic tradition in Millwood, McIntosh said. She recalled that when the opening meetings were held there, “the whole community came to see the dogs fly away”.

Millwood is an unincorporated village surrounding the old Burwell-Morgan Mill. Its origins date back around two centuries.

Fox hunting is “a very old tradition in Virginia,” McIntosh said. The Blue Ridge Hunt is one of some 45 such clubs across the state, she said.

Today, the hunt is focused on the members, who are animal lovers who enjoy riding horses through the landscape in the company of dogs, rather than the actual hunt, McIntosh continued.

Foxes run fast, so he’s rarely caught by dogs, McIntosh pointed out. When a person is captured, they are usually sick or have been injured in the past, she said.

“We are not trying to catch them,” she said. “We try not to kill them.”

The hunt has more than 100 dogs, but only about 45 outings per event, McIntosh said.

Hunting takes place on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from September to March. The opening meeting marks the official start of activities. Pre-competition gatherings primarily involve “cubbing,” the process of introducing new dogs to the pack and conditioning for the hunt, McIntosh said.

On horseback, the hunt passes through properties owned by approximately 200 Clarke County landowners who allow them to do so. The size of these properties ranges from a few acres to about 1,000 acres.

McIntosh said the Hunt members were grateful to the landowners.

“Without the generosity of the farmers and landowners in this county, we would not be able to continue,” she said.

More information on the hunt is on his website. To access it, go online at https://www.blueridgehunt.org/wp/events.


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Non profit living

“It’s like having another job” – poverty relief programs hard to navigate during pandemic

Rain Chamberlain, who identifies with the pronoun they / them, lives in a small stucco house in Fresno with their child and a roommate. Chamberlain’s workspace is tucked away in a corner of the living room.

“This is my office here,” they say as they sit down at the desk and begin a regular routine, logging into one of the many government websites they use to access assistance programs. .

“So if I were to go to ‘My Benefits, Calwin’,” they say, waiting for the page to load.

“Oh hey, guess what. The internet decided it wasn’t there, ”Chamberlain laughs.

It takes at least a minute to reconnect the laptop to Wi-Fi.

“That’s a lot,” Chamberlain said, concentrating on the screen.

It takes another 30 seconds for the website to load.

“And a lot of times, I’ll be multitasking. I’ll be working in other tabs while I wait for these items to load, ”Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain writes grants for nonprofit organizations, including one they just started on their own.

“You know, it’s not there yet, but it’s getting closer. I get to the point where I work pretty much full time, ”they say.

Chamberlain, who is a single parent, has also recently started taking online classes. But Chamberlain says one of the most time-consuming and stressful parts of their routine is keeping up with government assistance programs that are helping them get by.

“The housing authority, social assistance, the rehabilitation department, the telephone and the Internet are benefiting,” says Chamberlain, finally referring to the California LifeLine program.

Right now, they have four assistance programs and have applied for a fifth – utility assistance from the Fresno Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

Chamberlain is disabled and sometimes uses a wheelchair. And once COVID hit, their household lost jobs and income.

“Living in poverty usually means going through eight different crises simultaneously,” explains Chamberlain.

It’s like having another job to maintain program benefits.

“So there’s this expectation that from 7:00 am to at least 6:00 pm, you have to be available for any random phone calls, any random text, any random email,” Chamberlain explains.

They say they spend 10 to 60 hours a month keeping up to date with all the programs. They say a lot of the skills needed are financial.

“Bank statements and paypal records and everything to show all my itemized income,” Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain goes through a stack of papers in a trash can. There are 12 bins for each month of the past year. Chamberlain says it helped them sort through the paperwork to re-apply for the housing authority voucher, which is key to lowering the cost of their monthly rent.

“I have to be the one to sit there and professionally make sure it all adds up,” Chamberlain said, flipping through the papers.

Chamberlain says it took about 60 hours over a three month period to complete this app. Before COVID, recipients could schedule appointments to help fill out forms. But everything changed very suddenly.

“Even the desks that they are still there, even though the workers themselves will still go to work every day, that doesn’t mean beneficiaries can enter,” Chamberlain says.

They say browsing can be overwhelming for some of the most vulnerable populations, especially when reliable internet access and often a printer or scanner are needed.

“People who have been disenfranchised, who have multiple marginalizations, all these different things absolutely need to be part of these programs. And the punishment, the pretty literal punishment if you don’t, is homelessness and often death, ”Chamberlain says.

That’s why Chamberlain created a non-profit organization. It’s called Navigating Structures and now has 501c3 status.

“This is by and for people who fit into both the crossroads of disability and chronic homelessness or at chronic risk of homelessness,” Chamberlain said.

It was designed from Chamberlain’s own experiences in and out of homelessness. The goal is to build a stronger community by paying homeless people to work on their own passions, whether it’s fixing bikes or cooking. At present, Chamberlain is still seeking grants to fund the organization.

“We can have the time and the energy to really invest in our community, without having to worry about where that next paycheck comes from,” Chamberlain said.

Although Chamberlain is not yet making any money in this phase of the nonprofit organization, they are hopeful that this effort will pay off in the future.


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Canadian army

George Fagan obituary (2021) – Chelmsford, MA

CHELMSFORD

George A. Fagan, 96, a resident of Chelmsford for nearly 60 years, passed away peacefully on Sunday October 3, 2021 at D’Youville Life and Wellness Community, Lowell, surrounded by his loving family. Beloved husband of the late Beatrice (Everett) Fagan with whom he shared 52 years of marriage until his death in 2005.

George was born in Houghton-le-Spring, England on August 9, 1925, the son of the late James and Anne (Atkinson) Fagan. The son of a coal miner, George grew up in the north-east of England, in the coal village of New Silksworth. He graduated from 2nd in his class and got a scholarship to Durham University where he studied physics and mathematics. His university studies were interrupted while he was proudly serving as an officer in the British Army during World War II (the 161st British Infantry and later the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers of the British Territorial Army). After the war he finished his studies in Durham and obtained an honors degree in physics. George was a proud but low-key member of Mensa International and had an IQ above the 98th percentile.

In 1953, George married the love of his life, Beatrice Everett. He first worked for Imperial Chemicals, Inc (ICI – later ICI DuPont) in England. Seeking new opportunities beyond post-war England, George, Beatrice and their first son, David, immigrated to Ontario, Canada in 1956. His second son, Kevin, was born in Canada in 1956 George landed a professional position with Gelman and Associates of Ontario. , Canada while serving as a Reserve Officer in the Canadian Army. His new position allowed him to work with computers in their infancy and to develop expertise in the then emerging field of information technology. In 1958, George accepted a consultancy assignment with MITER, a so-called nonprofit “think tank” in Bedford, Massachusetts, to develop approaches to integrate computer and radar technology to strengthen American air defenses in order to counter the increase in Soviet power. threat of cold war. His daughter Joanne was born in 1960 and his third son Peter was born in 1961. In 1962 George accepted a permanent position with MITER and the family moved to Chelmsford.

George’s career at MITER included managing and contributing to numerous information technology projects for the U.S. government and its allies, with an emphasis on command, control, communications, and intelligence systems ( C3I). George moved his family to Washington DC in 1966, to help start the MITER office and operations in Washington DC. George was naturalized as a US citizen in November 1968. In 1969 a fourth son, Keith, was born. Later that year, George took an assignment with MITER to support NATO at his headquarters and moved the family to Brussels, Belgium. Returning to Chelmsford in 1972, George remained at MITER to provide systems engineering support to the US Air Force until his retirement in 1990. George traveled frequently throughout his career in Europe, including long-term assignments in Italy, Turkey, Norway and Germany.

After his retirement, George taught systems engineering part-time with Learning Tree International, enjoyed his family, especially his grandchildren, and studied and learned languages ​​such as French, German, Italian and a little Russian. George enjoyed reading novels in various languages ​​and learning new technologies. George loved spending time with his family and friends and welcomed them all to his home where he lived independently until 2020. With George, the door was always open and the kettle was still on.

George leaves behind 3 children: Kevin J. Fagan and his wife Pamela J. (Gibson) Fagan of Centerville, VA; Joanne (Fagan) Salomaa and her husband William C. Salomaa of Chelmsford, MA; and Peter T. Fagan and partner Julie Connolly of Chelmsford, MA and Hudson, NH. George also leaves behind his sister, Kathryn (Fagan) Nunn of Bath, England. George leaves behind 5 grandchildren: Drew D. Fagan of Arlington, VA; Alexander C. Fagan and his wife Nicole (Woodward) Fagan of Salt Lake City, UT; Timothy C. Salomaa from Costa Mesa, California; Elizabeth G. Salomaa of Sarasota, Florida; and David E. Salomaa of Chelmsford, MA. George also leaves Christopher Connolly, Elizabeth Connolly and his daughter, Camryn, Daniel Connolly and KelliAnne Connolly, all of Hudson, NH.

George was predeceased by his wife, Beatrice (Everett) Fagan (1932 – 2005) and by his sons David J. Fagan (1955 – 1977) and Keith B. Fagan (1969 -2013).

Visiting hours will be Tuesday October 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. at BLAKE CHELMSFORD FUNERAL HOME, 24 Worthen Street, CHELMSFORD. His Christian Burial Mass will be celebrated Wednesday at 11 a.m. at St. Mary’s Parish, 25 North Rd., CHELMSFORD. PLEASE VISIT THE CHURCH. At the request of the family, masks are compulsory. Interment to follow at Pine Ridge Cemetery, CHELMSFORD. Memorial donations can be made in George’s name to the Lewy Body Dementia Association (lbda.org) or the Cancer Center at Lowell General Hospital. For directions and online condolences, please visit CHELMSFORDFUNERALHOME.COM.

View George A. Fagan Memorial Online

Posted by Lowell Sun on October 10, 2021.


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