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Newport D-Day veteran Lyndon Sheedy’s medals have gone home

The last wish of a decorated Newport D-Day veteran has been granted – after his medals were returned to Wales from his home in Canada.

Lyndon Sheedy, CStJ, CD, ADC from Crindau had a decorated career in the Armed Forces and regularly returned from his home in Canada to Newport and France to pay his respects on D-Day.

Lyndon Sheedy in his South Wales Borderers uniform

Mr Sheedy passed away at the age of 96 on August 14, 2020 and wanted his medals returned to the Royal Regiment of Wales Museum in Brecon – formerly the South Wales Borderers Museum.

On September 30, 2021, his sister Joan Reynolds – herself a veteran who served in the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) attached to the Royal Artillery on anti-aircraft guns – and Lord Lieutenant of Gwent, Brigadier Robert Aitken were awarded his military and civilian medals. and awards as well as two photos to the museum’s curator, Amanda Rosewarne. They were joined by Mrs. Reynolds’ friends Ivan and Sue Beatty.

South Wales Argus: Lord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitken and Joan Reynolds MBE presenting Royal Regiment of Wales Museum curator Amanda Rosemarme with Lyndon Sheedy medalsLord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitken and Joan Reynolds MBE presenting Royal Regiment of Wales museum curator Amanda Rosemarme with Lyndon Sheedy medals

Mr. Sheedy was born in Crindau on July 31, 1924 and he joined the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers in 1942 and was assigned to A Company to secure the residence of Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

On D-Day – June 6, 1944 – he was posted to Normandy with the 2nd Battalion and the Gloucesters and Essex regiments. At 7:30 am, he landed on the ‘Gold’ beach in Normandy. He was then injured and returned home for treatment.

He then served with the 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers in Cyprus, Gaza and Palestine during the uprising. He also served in Sudan and Eritrea.

South Wales Argus: Lord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitkin and Joan Reynolds with medals and photographs of Lyndon Sheedy at the Royal Regiment of Wales MuseumLord Lieutenant for Gwent Brigadier Robert Aitkin and Joan Reynolds with the medals and photographs of Lyndon Sheedy at the Royal Regiment of Wales Museum

Mr. Sheedy spent the last period of his career in the British Army as a permanent staff instructor at the Brecon Regimental Depot. He left the British Army in 1952 with the rank of sergeant.

In 1953, he enlisted in the Canadian Army as a corporal and was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Guard Battalion. The following year, he was promoted to sergeant. In 1956, he was posted to NATO, West Germany, as a platoon commander and, upon his return to Canada, he performed field garrison and ceremonial guard duties on the Parliament Hill.

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He was promoted to warrant officer in 1965 and served as a company quartermaster. He then returned to NATO in West Germany to the brigade headquarters where he served as an administrative adjutant.

Mr. Sheedy returned to Canada at Bordon, Ontario, and served as the Senior Warrant Officer in the Infantry Basic Training Division. In 1972, he transferred to the Combat Arms School as an instructor, then to the Mechanized Commando where he was a platoon warrant officer.

In 1974, he was appointed lieutenant and requested leave from the Canadian Forces. As a civilian, he was later employed by the United States Embassy in the Department of State Administration on General Services. His role was to coordinate and oversee the placement of staff during presidential visits, the Secretary of State and other VIPs.

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy in his Order of St. John uniformLyndon Sheedy in his Order of St. John uniform

He was awarded the United States Government Medal of Citation for his outstanding performance and upon his retirement in July 1989 he was awarded a Certificate for Dedicated Service to the Government of the United States of America by the United States Ambassador in Canada, Edward N. Ney.

After his retirement, Mr. Sheedy devoted his time to the community, spending 17 years with the Order of St. John – where he was described as personifying the principles of the Order and was recognized as a “rare person who has shown leadership and determination extremely well. of the highest level. ‘

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy's medalsLyndon Sheedy’s medals

Mr. Sheedy has received a number of accolades from various organizations and nations for his service. He was awarded the French National Order of the Legion of Honor – the highest national order in France. It was presented to him by the French Ambassador to Canada at the French Embassy in Ottawa.

He also received a medal from the mayor of Caen in France – a place he visited every year. This presentation was made in her house in Newport by Madame Marie Lambert-Prou.

He was elevated to the rank of Officer and then Commanding Officer in 1983 during ceremonies at Christchurch Cathedral in Ottawa. In July 1991, he was appointed aide-de-camp to the Governor General.

South Wales Argus: Lyndon Sheedy's military and civilian medalsLyndon Sheedy Military and Civilian Medals

For 32 years, he took care of his wife Jean who suffered from MS. He also took care of another lady who lived in the same apartment complex for 11 years.

Mr. Sheedy not only had a long and exceptional career in the military and government, but he was also an author and artist. He painted landscapes and wrote about his life and experiences in his book Under five flags, the Odyssey of a soldier.


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Rodney N.

The author Rodney N.