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A Year of Service for All: The Key to Rebuilding the Fabric of Our Nation

As our nation moves away from the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and Congress moves closer to requiring women to register for selective serviceI can’t help but think of the 13 soldiers who died on August 26 in Kabul. How they were linked in service to the nation. How they answered the call at such a young age – five of them were only 20 when they died. How they represent a cross-section of America – cities, men and women, different ethnicities, serving side by side on behalf of our great nation.

I can’t help but think about how divided our country has become. We live in individual Americas bubbles – physically and culturally, in person and online. The contrasts between our Americas were highlighted for me recently, during our first family vacation since the pandemic. We were in the Great Basin, on the border of Nevada and Utah, a decidedly rural area, different in every conceivable way from the dense New York suburbs that I call my home. Our motorhome broke down on a washed out gravel road in the middle of a dusty field, and a few good souls came to help us. Through my military service and that of my husband, we instantly forged a connection, a shared humanity, because they helped us out of the gap.

Having been fortunate enough to visit a few national parks on our trip, I remembered the excellent work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. 1930s engineering and the blood, sweat and tears of a representative sample of Americans created the Angel’s Landing Trail in Zion, among many others. What is my generation’s lasting gift to Americans a century from now, I wondered? What will our Angel’s Landings be?

Taking all of these thoughts – our fallen servicemen, our divided country, our aging infrastructure – together, it seems to me that maybe, for so many reasons, it’s time to broaden the conversation of the women signing up for the project – to all 18-25 year olds serving our nation to some extent.

I feel very lucky to be born into a family that values ​​service before oneself. My maternal grandparents both served in World War II and my parents both moved thousands of miles from home to work in the Navajo Nation. These values ​​are, in large part, what drove me to go to West Point and serve in the military.

The irony is that now, over a decade after my military service, living squarely in an unrepresentative slice of America, I realize that my time in uniform has given me far more than I have ever had. never given – and I also realized that national service can be the key to mending the tattered fabric of our national narrative. As our country has become more and more divided, what I appreciate most is that through my service I was able to experience all from America. Like those 13 brave servicemen, I too was side by side with a cross-section of America. I have lived in places very different from where I grew up, be it rural Missouri, the metropolis of Oahu, a German village, or a large base in Iraq. These experiences help me understand, appreciate, respect and love the diverse perspectives of the countless parts of America that exist in our fractured country – and allow me not only to coexist, but to connect and thrive in places. away from where I now call home.

I feel that encouraging more national service or, better yet, making it compulsory, is the most important solution we have to one of the most fundamental challenges we face: fixing the divisions in our country and fundamentally strengthen the fabric that binds all of us together. This fall, as Congress discusses including all women in selective service, let’s take it a step further and start discussing how to include all 18-25 year olds in a national service program.

Service can take many forms, such as joining the military or AmeriCorps, working at a nonprofit, joining a parks system, or teaching at an underserved school. What matters most is not only that the service helps strengthen our country and its citizens, but that it is designed for young Americans to work closely with teammates with significantly different lived experiences, serve in places different from where they come from, do more important work and accomplish difficult feats.

As we work on policy changes to make service mandatory, there are steps we can take now to make service feel mandatory and celebrated. What if recruiters asked about service experience during interviews? What if it was included in college applications? What if there was a way to give diplomas and certifications at the end, who would then help people find future employment? Measures like these can start now to give more credibility to such an important activity.

Imagine a country in which all 18-25 year olds spend a lot of time alongside other Americans who come from very different parts of the country and serve in parts of the country very different from where they grew up. Imagine not only the positive impact this can have on our country’s infrastructure – our 21st Century Angel Landing – but also the impact it will have on every individual. “Other Americas” will no longer feel like foreigners, and we will appreciate the values ​​that unite us all as Americans, which are greater than any political party, demographic, or city big or small in our great country. These experiences will leave an indelible mark on every person who serves, and as a group, it will strengthen our country in ways we sorely need.

Elizabeth Young McNally is Executive Vice President of Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic initiative of Eric and Wendy Schmidt, former partner and global leader of McKinsey Academy, and veteran of service in Iraq in the US military. Liz was also named president of the visiting council of the US Military Academy. A Rhodes and Truman scholar, she began her career as a military police officer in the United States Army. She and her husband John are raising their three school-aged children outside of New York City and taking every opportunity to introduce them to and serve the diversity that makes up our nation.


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Police chief no longer has to live in Broomfield – Greeley Tribune

Broomfield Police Chief is no longer required to live within city and county limits, the city council voted on Tuesday evening.

The ordinance was passed 8-1 with Councilor Elizabeth Law-Evans voting no and Councilor Sharon Tessier absent.

Police Chief Gary Creager announced in June that he was retiring on January 11, 2022 after 40 years in law enforcement. His retirement and the subsequent recruitment process allowed city and county staff to reconsider the residency requirement, the council’s memo said.

“Given the recent and future difficulties in recruiting and retaining law enforcement positions, the reassessment of the residency requirement is timely,” the note said. “The change in the residency requirement will allow staff to expand the pool of potential candidates when recruiting a new police chief to ensure that the city and county are able to attract and retain the chief.” most qualified police officer, regardless of residence. “

Of the 18 municipal staff police departments surveyed in the Denver / Boulder area, only two have a residency requirement, according to data presented during the first reading of the order on August 24.

City Councilor Deven Shaff said he heard concerns from residents about how a police chief who potentially does not live in Broomfield will be connected to the community of Broomfield.

“Our policing department is deeply integrated into every aspect of everything we do,” said Jennifer Hoffman, city and county manager. “And to think that we would pick a police chief who doesn’t embody that just isn’t going to happen.”

Shaff asked if a police chief would be less devoted to the citizens of Broomfield simply because he does not live in Broomfield.

“Resolutely, unequivocally, I can say absolutely not,” Hoffman said.

Law-Evans said his lack of support for the ordinance was not directed against any person or circumstance.

“I know the BPD is tightly integrated into the community. I think it’s important to consider what the situation would look like several years from now, maybe decades later, ”she said. “The comments I have received from my constituents are that it is very important for the chief of police himself to live in our community, to integrate so closely with our community.

Law-Evans said she was ready to draft an amendment to the ordinance that would give preference to applicants who already live or are willing to move to Broomfield, although the Council is not in favor.

Mayor Guyleen Castriotta noted that this was Hoffman’s hire and not Council.

“We should all facilitate this hire by giving it the most leeway to choose from the largest pool of candidates,” Castriotta said.

Before the ordinance was passed, the chief of police and the city and county manager were the only two employees required to live in Broomfield.

The job posting was posted on Wednesday and applications are being accepted until October 27 at 5 p.m.

“The position will report to the City and County Director and will work closely with all city and county departments, community members, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations and our regional partners,” indicates the list. “As a visible community leader, the police chief will demonstrate and uphold the fundamentals of community policing, that is, position the department as one that ‘politics with and within the community’, as opposed to ‘community policing’.

The annual salary range is $ 175,000 and $ 200,000. For more information, visit Broomfield.org/ChiefOfPolice.


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Parents of shooting victims hope New Haven collaboration will reduce violence – NBC Connecticut

New Haven partners with CT Against Gun Violence (CAGV) to fight violence in the city.

The non-profit organization will engage community members and guide the city’s new violence prevention office.

The CAGV says it will be holding community listening sessions soon to discuss ways to prevent gun violence, in particular preventing it, intervening and also focusing on the after-effects.

The announcement was made at the Healing Botanical Garden in Elm City on Friday.

There, bricks commemorate the lives lost in New Haven to gun violence.

“It’s sad. My heart goes out to all of these moms,” said Pamela Jaynez, who doesn’t want to keep adding names to a path she helped create.

“Ten more bricks are being laid tomorrow and it’s not even for September and October. We go back to the months of June and July for which these are asked. “

Jaynez took NBC Connecticut to see his son’s brick.

Walter Jaynes Sr. would have turned 44 in June. He was killed in 1997.

“He’s been gone longer than he’s lived… It was six days before his 20th birthday when he was murdered.

The grieving mother is hoping New Haven’s collaboration with CAGV will have an impact, a step she believes is in the right direction to stop this growing path of deadly gun violence.

“I had no idea going to this funeral, that one day I would be one of those front row relatives,” said Thomas Daniels, who has the same background as Jaynez.

Her son Thomas was killed in 2009.

“These young murderers don’t know the effect they have on families, and the long-term effects, because for the last two or three years, I’ve just started to live. I just started living, ”said Daniels, who started the Fathers Cry Too group to help others experience what he has.

As New Haven searches for creative ways to fight violence, Daniels hopes all Connecticut communities come together to make a difference.

“It is no longer a black against black crime. Gun violence is everywhere. Death knows no boundaries.

A push for change – a Jaynez says she will never stop doing while her son watches over her.

“Every time I come here and start talking about my son, the chime (starts ringing) and I know he says to me, ‘Yeah, mom, yeah. “”


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10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree

A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

Register now: Be smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter


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Argus Wesleyan | WesCeleb: Philippe Bungabong ’22 on Freeman Scholarship, Nonprofit Work and American Idol

c / o Yongxi Tan ’22

During his college application, Philippe Bungabong ’22 was looking for an opportunity to further broaden his intellectual horizons. Throughout his time at the university, Bungabong has made himself an indispensable member of several campus communities, including the sailing team, the economics department and the Career Center. Outside of class, Bungabong can be found co-managing his non-profit organization, cooking delicious meals or singing. The Argus caught up with Bungabong on a foggy Tuesday evening over a glass of wine.

Argus: Why do you think you are nominated to be a WesCeleb?

Philippe Bungabong: [Laughs.] I think I was nominated for, well, part of it has to be nepotism.

A: Yeah, WesCeleb is talking about nepotism. [Laughs.]

PB: I have a number of great friends on The Argus, but I also think the other part of that should be the time I spent working at different levels on campus. I have been a residential counselor, I have worked as a teaching assistant for several classes and I am also part of the sailing team. I also sing and write songs and am friends with several people on the artistic side of campus. It’s just a gift, to know different people from different walks of life, and I am honored to be a WesCeleb.

A: Could you tell us more about the Freeman scholarship?

PB: The Freeman scholarship program, as it operated during my year, was that Wesleyan selected one student each from 11 countries in the East and South East Asia regions. I believe the countries are Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, China, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Of course, this has been a great opportunity to learn Wesleyan at no cost, but I also think the Freeman Scholars community is such a powerful community just to have students who really love to learn and study so many different things. I like the way I study economics and applied data science, but a number of other Freeman fellows are more in computer science or more in environmental studies or government. And they’re always the first, or among the first, groups of people I would tap into for insight into these areas.

A: Speaking of fields of study, did you know you wanted to study economics when you arrived? How did it happen?

PB: I came in thinking I wanted to study something more quantitative. I was either thinking about physics, math, or economics, and I took the three years of first and second year, but I think what I was most excited about was economics, and the ECON300 class, of which I am currently CA. It is a course on quantitative methods in economics. It was in this course that I really realized how economics is an area that will help me see and quantify the systems and interactions in the world.

A: It makes sense! I want to go back to your experiences at Wesyou mentioned that you have met so many different people on campus, people from all walks of life through your engagements. Which were the most valuable in shaping your Wesleyan experience?

PB: My closest friends are on the sailing team. I live with two of my co-captains. I had never sailed before entering college and it was just something I had chosen in first year and kept. I love sport. I also like the people in it. But aside from the sailing team, I would say my time as a tour guide, and now as a senior interviewer, continues to inform my time at Wesleyan. As a tour guide, I continue to introduce Wesleyan to future students, and this has given me a new set of eyes again through which I look at Wesleyan…. I always try to keep finding things that I love about Wes and also things that I want to improve about Wes, or things that I would like them to be different about Wesleyan, all with the goal of communicating why I think Wes might be a good fit for someone. I would say Wesleyan is not a perfect school, but for some people it is the ideal school, and I want to make sure that I am able to communicate that to all the potential students who come here.

A: Speaking of college admissions and helping people find perfect universities, you also run an educational non-profit organization.!

PB: I co-founded CAUSE Philippines when I was a freshman here. I co-founded it with two other low income Filipino students and we really built it with the idea that talent is everywhere, but opportunity not. We wanted to equip other low income Filipino students with the best college education they can receive so that one day they can go home and develop their community for the better, as we believe low income students know the more intimately the problems of their community. focused towards.

A: Could you explain what CAUSE does in particular?

PB: We organize a variety of programming events. We have a mentoring program, where we match mentees (low income high school students) with mentors, who are currently students in the US, UK, Singapore and around the world. We guide them step by step through the university application process, preparing for the SATs, writing their common application activities, their essays, requesting recommendations from teachers, all because it There is no defined infrastructure with which these students can really work, especially in terms of applying abroad.

Apart from that, we also run webinars that are more open to the public, and we do that on topics like how [to] get scholarships abroad, which scholarships are even available. We run these events throughout the year where we really try to bring together talent, not only from the capital of Metro Manila, but also from remote provinces in the Philippines.

A: Beyond non-profit and academic work, you are also an artist! What does music mean to you? You always joke about how you want Ryan Seacrest to work, so tell me about “American Idol” and the role he’s played in your life.

PB: [Laughs] Music has always been an outlet for me. I grew up watching American Idol, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood from the living room, even though I lived in Manila, Philippines, a 17 hour flight from New York. Growing up, I was always drawn to singing competitions. I think it’s so much fun watching people sing, but also from a competitive point of view, strategizing and trying to win a singing competition. My interest in music really arose from the fact that I grew up watching shows like American Idol, but also growing up in the Philippines, where everyone sings karaoke. So I sang a lot of karaoke growing up, and now music is still my biggest outlet. I rely on a number of songs for whatever mood I’m in. If I can’t find the appropriate song for this moment, and if I have enough creativity in me, I would write the song and my approach to songwriting This is typically what I want to learn from my own experiences , but also wanting to generalize, so that a number of other people can also feel what I felt.

A: It’s really beautiful, isn’t it? The interaction between an audience and the artist and how it reinforces meaning.

PB: Yeah yeah.

A: Well Philippe, we’re kinda friends because of the pandemic.

PB: [Laughs] Yes.

A: [Laughs] Well we were stuck here [on campus] for a long time.

PB: [Laughs] During a very long time.

A: How do you think COVID-19 impacted you and your time at Wesleyan?

PB: The pandemic really made me appreciate the importance of community, of staying in touch with those who matter to you, whatever the circumstances. Of course, respecting the safety and hygiene measures. During the pandemic, I realized that my friends in the Wesleyan community are so important to me and so important to my college experience and that they really add a lot of color to a genre of college learning that was otherwise mostly black and White. When we were all sent home in second year, I realized that, my God, I’m still so lucky to have other Wesleyan students around me.

And when people were sent home, Nalu Tripician, my best friend on this campus, was so far away from me, but we still called every now and then, and that was one of the times I really realized that I wanted to stay in touch with many members of the Wesleyan community and friends that I have met over the years. And now that we’re all in person again, I really try to cherish every moment that I have with my friends in Wesleyan.

A: What advice would you give your freshman?

PB: I would say “breathe”. Breathe and recognize that everything will be fine. Just keep doing your best, but also live in the moment and don’t always think about what to expect.

A: Certainly not! [Laughs]

PB: I think as a senior now I realize that college is really short. And it’s the last four years (unless you’re in graduate school), the last four years of your life that are super structured, after that you’ll be released into the workforce and you’ll have 17 days of paid leave. So for my first year, breathe, have fun, and keep doing your best, but rest assured knowing that if you do your best, you’ll be fine too.

A: In that vein, how did Wesleyan shape you?

PB: I think Wesleyan made me more open-minded, in every sense of the word. I came here from a rather conservative Asian family, studied at a science high school and grew up with the idea that you would only be successful if you studied something in science or something quantitative, but coming to Wesleyan, meeting so many open-minded people like that, also made me realize that there are so many different perspectives that I could learn from, recognize and grow with. It is something that I will strive to keep in my heart even as I leave Wesleyan. Being open to as many experiences as possible, to as many right perspectives as possible, and not always having a clear idea of ​​what is right and wrong on my mind, and being open to changing your mind.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

You can reach Magda Kisielinska at [email protected].


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New Beginnings Focuses on Rapid Relocation Program

Santa Barbara – South County

SANTA BARBARA, Calif .– Housing for so many in the Santa Barbara area has become increasingly problematic over the past six to eight months, especially for people who are unemployed and homeless, often through no fault of their own .

UC Santa Barbara faces a housing crisis among students by turning to local motels and hotels that now serve as dormitories. The New Beginnings nonprofit looks to the community to help those in need, trying to help themselves.

‘Housing First’ is the goal of the organization’s Rapid Relocation Program, which helps connect people living in their cars and campervans with participating owners ready to open their homes or apartments. from grandmother to provide housing.

Quick relocation is the cornerstone of this year’s annual fundraising gala on Thursday night, featuring New York Times author, activist and best-selling actress Annabelle Gurwitch. Gurwitch recently became an owner to accommodate a young couple living in their vehicle. She recounted the experience in a book published earlier this year titled “When Are You Going? Adventures in Downward Mobility.”

We’ll learn more about Gurwitch and New Beginnings tonight at 5:00 am and 6:00 am.

California / Community / Economy / Education / Home & Home / Lifestyle / Money & Business / Outdoors / Home Safety / Security / Technology / Your Money


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Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs

Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, [email protected]; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions, you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise noted.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email [email protected], or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

Central PA Pink Connection Costume Party – 7-10 p.m. October 9 at Brookmere Winery in Belleville. Tickets cost $ 25 and can be purchased by calling or texting (571) 422-8969 or online at https://bit.ly/3o2xqAT. More information: pinkconnection.org or [email protected]

¯RAP Mifflin County Section Lunch – October lunch at noon on Friday October 15 at Birch Hill Event Center, 1100 N. Pine St., Burnham. The menu will be caprese salad, ham, sweet potatoes, almond green beans, roll / butter, gingerbread. The cost of the meal is $ 14. The program will be “Unusual suspects”. If you plan to attend, please respond to this email, [email protected], by noon on Tuesday, October 12, or by calling (717) 437-6024. Please indicate the number of people present. All retirees from the school are welcome.

Thursday September 30

¯Ace the Interview – 10 a.m. to noon; PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn the best way to present yourself on paper and in person.

¯Intro to Microsoft Excel – 1 pm to 2:30 pm, PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn how to use basic Microsoft Excel spreadsheet functionality to create, track, and edit data. Find out how to insert and format formulas, use shortcuts, manage rows and columns, and insert headers.

Bingo – 1 p.m., Yeagertown Senior Center

¯Standard Steel Melt Shop Retirees Lunch – 8:30 a.m. at Yetter’s, McVeytown

Friday October 1

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ American Red Cross Blood Drive – 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Christ Church, Beaver Springs. Appointment required. For appointments and “Fast pass” visit: www.croixrouge.org.

¯45th annual JCS auction – 4 p.m. and up, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Saturday October 2

¯Church Hill UMC Art Festival – 9 am-2pm, 199 Woodland Circle. Rain or shine event. Information: (717) 667-3778.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5-8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

¯45th Annual JCS Auction – All Day, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. Auto Show, 10 am-4pm Horseshoe Tournament; Reenactors of the Civil War. More information: (717) 543-8457.

¯ Rescue Our Furry Friends Adoption and Giving Event – 9 am to noon at Blaise Alexander Subaru, Lewistown.

Sunday October 3

¯ Flea Market – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lewistown Moose, 80 Brady Lane.

Kettle Fest – 7 a.m. to noon at Tuscarora Heritage Days, East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email [email protected] or call (717) 248-6741.

1956 Rothrock High School class reunion – noon October 13 at Hoss’ home. More information: Shirley Davidheiser, (717) 248-2746.

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Woofstock, Wags & Whiskers events return this weekend

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Woofstock returns this weekend to Sedgwick County Park.

The Wichita Eagle

If you’re a dog or cat lover, free up your schedule this weekend for two fun outdoor events that organizers say are key to solving pet overcrowding and homelessness in the area. Wichita area. You can celebrate with other pet owners at Woofstock’s 25th anniversary on Saturday at Sedgwick County Park, then attend the Wags & Whiskers Dinner and Live Auction on Sunday night at Chicken N Pickle.

Two of Wichita’s biggest fundraisers for local animal rescue organizations are back in person this weekend after COVID-altered events last year. Both take place outdoors and both will continue their online components to expand their reach during what is described as a banner year for animal inputs at the local and national levels.

Christy Fischer, executive director of the Wichita Animal Action League, says a number of factors have led to an overcrowding problem that she and others are calling the worst they have seen in the wellness industry animal. Among the contributors: elective procedures, which included sterilizations and sterilizations for dogs and cats, were postponed to 2020 as hospitals worried about drug shortages for patients struggling with COVID; some owners have had to abandon animals for financial and housing reasons following pandemic closures; and an adoption rush in 2020 as people worked from home and didn’t travel.

“All of the rescues did a lot of adoptions over a fairly short period of time in 2020 instead of that number of adoptions spanning 12 to 16 months as we would normally see,” Fischer said. “So now adoptions are down across the board because people already have their pets and they’re not necessarily looking for another one. “

Wichita Animal Action League, or WAAL, is one of many state-approved rescue groups working alongside the Kansas Humane Society to help save pets from euthanasia at local shelters simply for want of space or funds for medical needs. KHS is Wichita’s largest privately funded nonprofit animal shelter organization. It cares for 16,000 pets each year through approximately 8,000 pet adoptions and provides spaying / neutering services for low-income people, end-of-life services and community outreach. WAAL is a foster home rescue and does not operate a full time facility. The group rescued approximately 1,100 animals in 2020 from overcrowded shelters and also conducts several community outreach initiatives, ranging from sourcing community pet food banks to approaching owners for neglect or neglect issues. cruelty.

KHS and WAAL said their fundraisers in 2020 brought in less dollars than in 2019 and they hope returning to the in-person events will help fund the community’s unprecedented needs. Here’s how to participate in either of these events:

Kansas Humane Society Woofstock

Woofstock, the Kansas Humane Society’s main annual fundraising event, has drawn up to 10,000 attendees in recent years and temporarily changed its format in 2020 to a drive-thru version of Woofstock and virtual activities. As they return in person for the 25th anniversary of the event, organizers expect the continued spread of COVID to keep attendance lower.

“We understand that not everyone is comfortable attending events right now,” said Ericka Goering, KHS Director of Marketing and Communications. “We’re an outdoor event and we have a big space, so people should be able to spread out. We recommend that those who want to go out, wear a mask and practice social distancing as much as possible. “

Woofstock is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at Sedgwick County Park, 6501 W. 21st St. Anyone 12 years of age and over pays $ 10 to access the festival grounds, which will have 80 vendor booths with freebies . as goods and services for sale, a beer garden, a dozen food trucks on site and live music: the acoustic duo Dangie Music in the morning and the rock band Tequila Ridge in the afternoon.

Dog activities include races, agility lessons and a costume contest. Planned human activities include a play clinic where kids can practice being a vet, raffles for gift baskets, stage contests featuring musical chairs and pet / owner costumes, photo booth and live demonstrations from the Wichita Police Department’s K-9 unit.

Also included in admission: A limited number of free microchips and dog vaccines are available on a first come, first served basis.

Five custom niches created by Commerce Construction Services Inc. will be on display at Woofstock; they are part of the Woofstock online auction which launched on September 20 and ends at 8 p.m. on October 4. or sign up for a VIP package. Tickets are also available at the door on October 2, but you’ll have a better choice of shirt size if you pre-register.

There are two VIP packages: $ 25 includes a t-shirt, event bag, dog bandana and entry to the event while a $ 40 package includes the Woofstock package plus participation in a walk launch at 9 a.m., breakfast, a Woof Walk t-shirt and early entry to the festival grounds.

Those who aren’t comfortable attending can still donate and receive freebies for the event, and KHS is promoting a series of activities online this week ahead of the event. Visit the group’s Facebook page (facebook.com/kshumane) to keep up with daily activity, from bad drawings of animals for a small donation to free photo contests with prizes.

WAAL Wags & Whiskers

This is the seventh year for Wags & Whiskers, the main annual fundraiser for WAAL, which began saving animals in crisis in November 2013. This year’s event was originally booked at a covered venue and the organizers decided to move it to the Chicken N Pickle outdoor area, 1240 N. Greenwich Road.

Doors open at 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 3 and the event runs from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets cost $ 75 per person and there were over 100 left at the start of this week. You will need to purchase a ticket before the end of the day Friday at WAALrescue.org/ww.

Admission includes vegan and non-vegan dinner options, beer and wine, a DJ playing music, and fun activities throughout the night. There will be a dog and cat toy raffle, wine raffle and live auction of 20 items with unique journeys and experiences.

Participants and those at home can bid on the silent auction, which is already live and has end times shifted to Sunday evening. You can register to bid using the same link above. If you can’t attend, Fischer said, consider fostering, volunteering, or donating in some other way described on the WAAL website.

More Upcoming Animal Rescue Fundraising Events:

ICT Dachshund Races, 2 p.m., Saturday, October 9, outside Historic Union Station, 701 E. Douglas: Held in conjunction with ICT Bloktoberfest, the annual Dachshund Races are great fun to watch and all proceeds go directly to Lifeline Animal Placement & Protection. LAPP is a non-profit animal rescue and adoption kennel based in Wichita; learn more about the group at lifelineanimalplacement.org.

In addition to the $ 5 entry fee per dog, funds are raised through a silent auction and raffles open to the public during the event, as well as merchandise. Registration and training from noon to 1:30 p.m. followed by a fancy dress contest for dogs at 1:45 p.m. and race from 2 p.m.

Who Let the Dogs Out 5K / 1 Mile Fun Run, Sunday, November 7, at the Sunflower Building at Sedgwick County Park: You can run with your canine running companion or just run alone; in any case, you will help reduce the overpopulation of pets in our region. This event raises funds for Spay-Neuter Kansas, a non-profit veterinary clinic located at 319 S. Hydraulic that provides low cost sterilization / sterilization to pets in low income households. Learn more about the clinic at spayneuterkansas.com. To register, search for the event name on Facebook and click Book Now, or search for the event on runsignup.com.

Online registration is $ 25 for the 1 mile tailwaggers event and $ 36 for the 5K timed chip event. This includes a t-shirt, a finishing medal and a raffle ticket for gift baskets. Dogs that participate will also receive racing gifts. Register by October 20 to guarantee your shirt size.

Fur Ball, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday, November 13, at The Vail, 210 N. Mosley: Fur Ball is the largest annual fundraiser for Beauties and Beasts Inc., a volunteer-run non-profit animal rescue organization that focuses on saving death row animals at shelters across the Wichita region and their placement in foster homes until adoption. Tickets start at $ 75 per person (beautiesfurball.givesmart.com) and include dinner from Culinary Catering plus two drink tickets. There will be silent and live auctions, photo booth, wine tasting and other activities. Learn more about the organization at beautiesandbeasts.org.


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#AM_Equality: September 28, 2021 – CRH

REPORT FINDS 2.3 MILLION LGBTQ + LATINX ADULTS IN AMERICA: A new report from the Williams Institute has found that of the 11.3 million LGBTQ + adults living in America, at least 2.3 million are Latinx. In addition, the report examined statistics relating to mental health, access to health care and economic characteristics. Williams Institute.

POLICE SERVICES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES CALL FOR LGBTQ + TRAINING: “Not only can training help the LGBTQ community, but it can also help police departments do their jobs better, especially those who are really invested in community policing,” said Christy Mallory, legal director for the Williams Institute of UCLA Law School. “These trainings can really help get to a place where LGBTQ communities feel comfortable working with law enforcement and really empower the police to do their jobs better and safer.” More NBC News.

🩺 GOP BILL WOULD FUND RESEARCH IN HEALTH CARE FOR YOUNG TRANSGENDERS: Last week, Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) introduced a bill that would end public funding for health care research for transgender youth. Specifically, the legislation “would prohibit the use of federal funds for gender transition among minors”. More American Independent.

FROM HOLLYWOOD TO CAPITOL HILL, HERE ARE 12 LGBTQ + LATINX TRAILBLAZERS: In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Cynthia Silva (@ItsCynthiaSilva) compiled a list of 12 LGBTQ + Latinx pioneers. More NBC News.

?? IN STATES

“BLACK TRANS WOMEN LIKE ME DIE IN TEXAS DUE TO POLITICAL GAMES”: In a comment by Diamond Stylz (@DiamondStylz), she writes: “I urge all allies and LGB people to join me in holding lawmakers to account and denouncing dangerous rhetoric as a violent threat. We must implore them to reject harmful anti-transgender laws and focus on promoting strong non-discrimination policies like the equality law and investing in the programs our communities need to thrive. More Lawyer.

✈️ CALIFORNIA BANS STATE-FUNDED TRAVEL TO OHIO DUE TO ANTI-LGBTQ + ACT: The California Attorney General on Friday announced that California would restrict state-funded travel to Ohio due to Ohio passing the “Medical Practitioner Conscience” clause in June, which has been dubbed ” allowed to discriminate ”. More Cleveland scene.

🌈 THE NEW MINNEAPOLIS NONPROFIT LAUNCHES AN LGBTQ + MENTORING PROGRAM, ONE OF NOTHING IN THE UNITED STATES: A new Minneapolis-based nonprofit called Queerspace Collective (@QueerspaceC) fills a critical void in LGBTQ + mentoring programs. The program hopes to expand nationwide in the coming years. More StarTribune.

ALABAMA ASBL OBTAINED A GRANT TO HELP DOCUMENT LGBTQ + HISTORY IN THE SOUTH: The Invisible Histories Project, a nonprofit that documents the history of LGBTQ + people in the South, received a $ 600,000 grant to document the history of LGBTQ + in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and the Panhandle of Florida. More AL.

CHARLESTON PRIDE’S REAL RAINBOW ROW TOUR EXPLORES THE LGBTQ + HISTORY OF THE CITY SUNDAY: As part of Charleston Pride Week, the tour will take attendees through the city’s historic neighborhoods as they tell the often-overlooked stories of Charleston’s LGBTQ + community. More Charleston City Paper.

?? CULTURE

NON-BINARY CHARACTERS LIKE ‘GONZO-RELLA’ ENLIGHTEN CHILDREN’S TELEVISION AND ENCOURAGE SELF-ACCEPTANCE: For children whose gender expression may not correspond to preconceived notions of boy or girl, it may be important to see themselves reflected on the screen. More CNN.

TIKTOK’S ELDERQUEER DESIGNERS BRING LGBTQ + HISTORY TO LIFE: A community of older LGBTQ + TikTokers are sharing their life experiences with a younger generation looking for mentorship. More them.

?? GLOBAL EQUALITY

🗳️ TWO TRANSGENDER WOMEN WIN SEATS IN THE NEXT GERMAN PARLIAMENT: Tessa Ganserer and Nyke Slawik made history yesterday by winning seats in the German Parliament in the Bundestag. More The New York Times and Reuters.

?? SCOTLAND IS NOW THE FIRST COUNTRY TO DEMAND LGBTQ + HISTORY IN SCHOOLS: More them.

You have news ? Send us your news and tips on [email protected].Click here to subscribe to #AM_Equality and follow@CRH for all the latest news. Thanks for reading!



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New Life Village near Tampa offers new homes for foster children, new purpose for seniors

As the only intergenerational residential model in the state of Florida to do what they do, New Life Village in Palm River, just east of Tampa, is working to reduce the number of children in foster care. ‘welcome for over a year.

Founded in 2012, New Life Village is helping solve two of the issues plaguing the Tampa Bay area: affordable housing and a foster care crisis.

With their mission being to provide a “supportive environment, within an intergenerational community for children in need of a safe, stable and permanent family experience”, the association’s leadership works on their 12-acre campus which is currently about 1/3 developed.

Earlier in September, the construction of two new buildings that will house 16 families in about a year, increasing the village from around 100 to 170. The new buildings will add to the 32 already existing townhouses, plus a community garden. , paddling pool, swimming pool, playground and football field. Plans further are preliminary, but now include a multi-purpose program building and one-bedroom living spaces for the elderly.

“The community and its program are focused on healing children,” says Mariah Hayden, Executive Director of New Life Village. “We help them overcome their trauma and gain coping mechanisms.”

Seniors living in the Village are all 55 and over and are here for an intentional retirement. They serve as surrogate grandparents, guardians and mentors.

“It’s basically the village elders in the saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child,’” says Hayden.

Being in New Life Village, she explains, prevents these abandoned, abused and neglected children, who usually do not live with their birth parents, from entering the foster care system. This creates a safe place where they can call “home” with their foster family without being stigmatized for being adopted.

The program also works to address the negative outcomes associated with foster care systems, such as low education / graduation rates, homelessness, teenage pregnancy, incarceration, mental health problems and unemployment.

In a survey collected from residents in June 2020, 88% of children had improved their grades since moving in, 100% of children thought they were an important part of the village family, 99% of seniors thought they were leading a determined and meaningful life-in-the-Village project, and 91% of caregivers were convinced that the Village’s family environment was safe. Breaking the cycle of many of the main issues in the foster care system, New Life Village has a positive impact on a variety of issues associated with traditional foster care: a lack of support from loved ones. caregivers, a shortage of foster parents, the impact of trauma and the lack of affordable housing.

“The longer children are placed in foster care, the more they have a physical likelihood of very negative and traumatic outcomes,” says Hayden.

The average household change per child is around three placements per year. Whenever this happens, this child not only loses a sense of family and stability, but is again traumatized by thinking that no one wants them and that he has nowhere to go.

“Children have a need and seniors have a need. Children and the elderly provide for everyone’s needs, so it’s a beautiful yin and yang relationship that provides psychological and health outcomes for both groups.

Of course, there are going to be problems that arise from mixing the generations. “If we go to our grandparents, no matter who we are, no matter how old we are, there’s a good chance they won’t understand some aspect of our life,” says Hayden. “You have the standard and expectations of each generation, and each generation looks at the other generation through that lens. “

From phone etiquette to good manners and work ethics, kids today hold very different values ​​than their elders, she says.

“Our elders come from a generation where you stayed married all your life, you chose a career and it was your career your entire life. The older generation is really attached to the idea that you start a job and move up the ranks. You stay a long time, you respect your elders no matter what, and that’s what the job looks like to them. The younger generation is completely on the other side of that spectrum, ”says Hayden.

The challenges caused by technological innovations and changes in the workplace will never go away.

“Our grandparents had the same problems with their grandparents and so on. … It’s just that things change and that will always be represented in the generations.

What is unique is how a versatile pace of life is based on societal manners.

“Our generation, and I in particular, are still going a million kilometers an hour. I’m still multitasking and do 25 things at a time. It is a blessing and a curse. They are [seniors] not like that, so when they come to the clubhouse and we see them in the community, they stop, take a break and have intentional, very present conversations with you, ”says Hayden. “It’s such a great way to remember to be there, to listen to people and to talk. … It shows us that we have to slow down and be present with each other because life is short.

Living in this type of community is also good for older people, giving them purpose and keeping them healthy and active while participating in the various activities offered by New Life Village. It is not a new concept; the United States is just late. For years, Europe has designed similar communities by incorporating assisted living facilities with college students, bringing in the elderly to daycare centers, etc.

To better understand the need, consider these statistics listed on the New Life Village website:

  • Florida is 3rd in the United States, behind California and Texas with 22,781 foster children;
  • Hillsborough County is # 1 and Pinellas County # 2 in Florida for the number of children in foster care;
  • Since January 2020:
    – 2,366 children were in foster care in Hillsborough County
    – 2,484 children were in foster care in Pinellas and Pasco counties

By going to the Take Action tab on the New Life Village website, you can help them take it one step closer to the end of their construction campaign or make a donation. For example, $ 25 per month allows a senior to participate in their on-site wellness program year-round, allowing them to choose from weekly yoga classes, tai chi classes, trips to the theater, etc.

Being a part of this community has given Hayden the chance to watch these children grow, grow stronger, heal, and gain confidence in who they are.

“From a holistic perspective, it’s just great because it provides a holistic healing context for the elderly and families of children,” says Hayden.

It’s a beautiful blend of culture and perspectives that come with time and age, together in one safe place. In a house.

For more information, see their website, Facebook page, and watch their story on CBN.


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