close

Non profit living

Non profit living

Confront the “myth of more money”

Part three in a series on the last eight years of my Seattle housing work.

From 2016 until the end of Washington State’s legislative session in 2019, I changed my approach to challenge the idea of ​​charging fees on new housing development and giving that money to organizations in non-profit. My argument was that the state’s largest city, Seattle, enforced the most rules, slowing production and thus creating higher prices as demand increased. As a result, most of the state’s available grants were consumed by Seattle, which was unfair to the rest of the state. Not only that, I argued, but building nonprofit housing in Seattle was very expensive and inefficient. Conventional wisdom was and still is that what is needed to solve housing problems is not more housing, but more and more money.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to challenge big business and government allies to crush your critics, forget the idea that it’s like the movie Silkwood. There is no Cher or Kurt Russell and above all there is no journalist waiting somewhere to write about it. It’s more like the X Files, if you go up against the big guys you’ll be caught on and ignored. The prize will be an effort to make you irrelevant, mad, or part of some kind of unreasonable clique. I had no idea when I took over the industrial non-profit housing complex.

Here is my logic. Having been a nonprofit developer, I knew these developers had to face a steep climb to build their projects, arguably a steeper climb than for-profit developers. The number of contracts, commitments, and acres of paperwork were all stacked on the same demands as the for-profit sector: finding land, zoning, design review, utilities, and labor costs. But because they had political favors, they could ask for more money to solve these problems and the political structure would oblige them with interventions like Mandatory Housing Affordability, the program that would make it worse and not better for the poor because “affordable housing” would be paid for. for with higher rents (see my last post and many more).

I knew the costs and difficulty of building non-profit housing, housing paid for by the MHA program, when exposed, could make people question the whole program itself. If nothing else, if I could find a way to show that more money was being spent on subsidized nonprofit housing in Seattle (where the MHA extortion program operated) than in the Washington countryside. , maybe we could force a conversation. The data supported my point; housing subsidies were consumed quickly by the state’s most blatant regulator of housing production, Seattle. If I could show that this was done to the detriment of the poorest immigrant farm workers, maybe we could get the press interested.

So I analyzed years of data from the state’s Housing Trust Fund and found that indeed, subsidies were piling up in Seattle while in rural areas, workers lived in their cars. I wrote an opinion piece on how access to water was choking the supply in rural areas and thus harming rural workers, primarily immigrants to Mexico. It infuriated House Speaker Frank Chopp as much as it pleased lawmakers in rural Washington, who were outraged by the rushed court decision by a left-wing Seattle advocacy organization. I had entered into a long-standing conflict on the side of the rural Republicans. Here I was a former Democrat from Seattle, working with Republicans.

My conversations with the President and with the Republican leaders were strange; I was making a valid argument, which went against everyone’s sensitivity. Democrats felt out of place, justifying more and more spending on expensive housing in Seattle (up to $ 500,000 per unit) while talking about how much they cared about rural immigrants, the people who did not benefit from housing subsidies because of rampant spending. in Seattle. Republicans were resistant to big spending schemes and more bureaucracy. So my proposal for a farm worker housing authority to take money out of Seattle and funnel it to farm worker housing fell on deaf ears there. I had managed to make valid points, but the policy was not in favor of the solution, of big changes in the subsidy system and of better management.

In a passive and aggressive Washington, my efforts have certainly been noticed. The President complimented me in an argument saying, “People are mad at you! ” Sure. But making people uncomfortable does not necessarily lead to policy change. Both left and right seem to have made peace with the inefficient way of subsidizing housing. I failed to convince Republicans in the Legislature to support the idea of ​​making the system fairer, and farmers and nonprofit real estate developers in rural Washington seemed intimidated by the task of taking over. the well-funded and politically connected non-profit organization. housing agencies in Seattle.

My campaign against the non-profit housing complex was a failure. He revealed, however, that there is an ongoing disparity in the way housing is subsidized in Washington. Recently, I showed how tax credits are pouring into Seattle, even though there is more poverty in rural Washington. Being white and awake means more money for housing. It was a deadly battle that exhausted many of my supporters, but I’m glad I made the effort. With all the money raised from the fees generated by the MHA fees and other largesse of recent federal legislation, I know the problem will not be solved with more money. It will get worse. The day may come when everyone can do the math and agree that fairness and efficiency are compassionate and that inflation is the greatest enemy of the poor.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Saint-Louis high school students demonstrate against gun violence in honor of 19-year-old

ST. LOUIS – Hundreds of students from Cardinal Ritter College Prep High School marched against gun violence on Wednesday in honor of 19-year-old Isis Mahr.

Mahr was murdered in a quadruple shooting in St. Louis in October after returning from work at an elderly care facility. Her father said she had a heart of gold.

“My daughter was very dynamic. She gave a lot to the community during the 19 years that she lived on this land, that God gave her to me and to my family ”, declared her father Atif Mahr.

Mahr was a remarkable graduate of Cardinal Ritter College Prep in 2020. Her family said she was a part of the soccer team and naturally a person who loved and cared for everyone around her.

She volunteered in the community and was studying to be a nurse. Friends and family of Isis have said the march and the gathering mean the world.

“I am grateful for the support. It’s a beautiful day, ”said his father. “It took away the heartache and pain to have this march in her honor to stop the violence and stop the killings and put down the guns. I can say as a parent that the community has spoken about my daughter and said that it is is enough. “


Source link

read more
Non profit living

“It’s my super power now”: Utah residents living with HIV work to break down stigma surrounding the disease

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – When Sequan Kolibas was diagnosed with HIV for eight years, the mother of one kept him to herself for years, largely fearing the reaction of others to her news.

Those fears were confirmed when she let out her secret one day while talking to a friend.

“We were just talking about HIV and, and I had kind of a seizure and I told him I had it and he was like, ‘Well, only hookers and junkies get HIV. So which one are you? ‘ “

Kolibas’ fear of the stigma surrounding the disease had proven to be justified. That had been her biggest concern when she learned she had contracted the virus from her five-year-old partner, a man.

“It was extremely scary, it changed my life,” she recalls. “To be honest. I had periods of suicidal thoughts, severe depression. I just thought my happiness was over and my life was over. I let HIV become who I am, instead of “to be a part of who I was. I let my diagnosis define me.

On Wednesday December 1, World AIDS Day will be celebrated, in memory of those who have lost their lives due to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, which is initially caused by a diagnosis of HIV. The occasion of 2021 is particularly poignant as it marks 40 years since the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) first reported the emergence of AIDS among gay communities in New York and California.

Originally dubbed “gay cancer,” the HIV and AIDS epidemic has been ravaged by misinformation, misunderstanding and, of course, stigma against those who contract the virus. Researchers ultimately reduced its primary means of transmission to sharing needles or injection equipment, exposure to blood in open wounds, and sexual intercourse. The shocking announcement of NBA star Magic Johnson’s infection in 1991 showed that HIV can affect people of any sexual orientation – gay or heterosexual – but many of the stigmas have always been hard to shake.

“I think this has persisted since the 1980s,” says Heather Bush, who manages the HIV program for the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) to ABC4.com. “In addition to facing a life-threatening disease, and all that it means, people with HIV worry about what people are going to think or how they are being paid. It’s just a huge additional burden that people have to face. And I think a lot of it is perception.

The truth is, living with HIV in 2021 is very different from what it was in 1981, as evidenced by testimonials and information from a new UDOH campaign, HIVandMe.com. While illness is still a part of life; the website says every three days a new Utah resident is diagnosed with HIV, no longer a death sentence.

Advances in prevention and treatment have made transmission nearly impossible for people with the disease who take appropriate measures, which can be as simple as a daily pill for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and extra precautions for antiretroviral therapy (ART). sexually active people. The new term in HIV medicine is “U = U”. The antiretroviral drug can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to undetectable levels. If it is undetectable, it cannot be transmitted to others.

“We know it’s still there, we know they still have the virus, but it’s so weak that not only does it protect them and keep them from getting sick, but it also prevents them from passing it on to others. people, ”he added. Bush says, adding that those who have an HIV-positive partner who are not infected can also take preventative drugs. “We have a lot of tools that we didn’t even have 5-10 years ago.”

The biggest obstacle that remains is stigma, as both Bush and Kolibas agree. While medical advances have provided the means to make the spread of HIV and AIDS much more difficult if the right precautions are taken, opening the dialogue is still a work in progress.

Kolibas has since found purpose by sharing its story and founding a nonprofit that provides resources to those infected and information to those with outdated fears and misconceptions about HIV and AIDS.

“You don’t have to change who you are, it doesn’t define who you are,” she says, mentioning that her T-cell count, or the number of disease-fighting blood cells, is higher than before. diagnostic. “We are opening the conversation to educate people so that we can reduce this stigma for people. “

For years, many have thought that even routine, non-sexual or blood-related contact with someone living with HIV could be dangerous. Kolibas’ mission now is to shatter these misconceptions.

“It’s the misconception of ‘Well it’s just a gay disease’, or if somebody has it, you can’t share the same utensils, you can’t squeeze them in their arms you can’t drink out of the same cup as them It’s just about education now I’m kind of using HIV as my superpower now.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Contra Costa Crisis Center helps parents share their grief and rediscover joy

WALNUT CREEK – Ann Khadalia and Steve Grimes interact with sometimes remarkable ease, sometimes finishing each other’s sentences or remembering another story to tell. They speak easily and think often.

They can always smile, and when the time is right, they can laugh too.

“Believe it or not,” Grimes said, “you can get away with this.”

Yet as they stand together outside the offices of the Contra Costa Crisis Center in Walnut Creek, holding a window to their soul – photos of Steve’s late son, Kevin, and Ann’s late daughter, Priya – the dark cloud of pain is never far beyond the horizon.

They are grateful that it is no longer raining sadness.

Grimes and Khadalia are close today as their respective paths connected and passed through the Contra Costa crisis center following the deaths of their children over 20 years ago. Kevin Grimes, who was almost 16, collapsed while on a scout outing with his father near Kirkwood Mountain Resort in March 1996 and never regained consciousness. Three years later, 5-year-old Priya Khadalia was struck and killed by an unlicensed driver of a car who turned on a red light at an intersection in Hayward.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Steve Grimes poses for a photo, with a photo of his 15-year-old son Kevin, whom he lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, in California, Wednesday, October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

Their parents are now volunteering on the same grief support teams that helped them survive the worst nightmare they have ever faced.

Grimes facilitates and sometimes leads bereavement groups. Khadalia does the same and was so inspired by the centre’s impact on her life that she obtained her Masters in Counseling at Cal State East Bay two years ago.

“We’re not trying to be therapists,” Grimes said. “We Listen. We are empathetic. We ask open ended questions. We have a conversation and we try to find a connection.

The Crisis Center has facilitated such conversations since 1963. The association is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology and provides 24/7 support and counseling to people in crisis, distress or suicidal, 365 days a year. . Its mission is to keep people in crisis alive until the storm passes.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Ann Khadalia poses for a photo, with a photo of her 8-year-old daughter Priya, whom she lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, California, Wednesday October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

The organization received funding this year from Share the Spirit, an annual vacation campaign that helps residents in need of East Bay. Donations will help support 56 nonprofit agencies in Contra Costa and Alameda counties. The center will use its grant for staff salaries and benefits; create the ability to return customers’ daily phone calls; train new volunteer animators; and coordinate weekly bereavement support groups.

Grimes and Khadalia said these services were essential for their ability to resume their lives after the loss of their children. Each participated in group sessions in small gatherings, meetings that turned strangers who started out into teammates united in grief.

“They helped me get through my grief, but to be more precise, they really allowed me to grieve,” Khadalia said. “I’m in this nightmare, but I was so wrapped up in the way other people were doing that I wasn’t dealing with my own feelings of loss and grief. I was just sort of surviving. The first few months were a total fog. I think for a year I cried every day. But the group helped me find a place to go with it all, and as you go through the process it starts to help you.

Grimes said the grieving groups at the center also provided a place where people were not afraid to talk with him about his loss, a key to his recovery. He said family and friends were initially reluctant to bring up Kevin for fear of opening a wound that was too painful.

Such fear is wrong, he said. The memory of Kevin is never far away, and neither is his father’s desire to talk about him.

“I’m always so happy when people ask me,” he said. “He was an adventurous young man. He had short trick type skis. He loved the Boy Scouts, he loved bungee jumping. We just did a lot, a lot of trips together during the summer. He was an explorer.

Khadalia similarly shines when the subject turns to Priya.

“She was a very lively and spirited little girl,” she said. “She was very determined, extremely curious. She loved to dance and took ballet lessons. She had a fearless personality.

In many ways, the same can be said of Priya’s mom and Kevin’s dad. They experienced the worst fear of parents. And while the scars are still there, so too are the inspiration they provide to countless others just by going forward and rediscovering the joy.

Both say the Crisis Center was an integral part of this process.

“As you get help, you come back to a place where you know you can help others,” Khadalia said. “And it seems helping others is what made that dark cloud not so close to me anymore. It’s there, but it’s very far now, and there is light now.

And the pain is less intense.

“The loss allows you to have a perspective,” Grimes said. “It teaches you what is important and what is not. We are here to show others that life can go on and on.


Share the spirit

The Share the Spirit vacation campaign, sponsored by the Bay Area News Group, provides relief, hope and opportunity to residents in need by funding nonprofit vacation and outreach programs in the counties of Alameda and Contra Costa. To make a tax-deductible contribution, cut the coupon accompanying this story or go to www.sharethespiriteastbay.org/donate. Readers with questions, as well as individuals or businesses interested in making grants or contributions, can contact the Share the Spirit program at 925-655-8355 or [email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

New Mexico Legal Aid Makes a Difference for Highly Needed Clients | My opinion

New Mexico Legal Aid is a non-profit law firm that has provided free legal assistance to New Mexicans living in poverty for over 50 years. Inside our offices, the reception call center is fully loaded as soon as we open our doors.

It is very common for potential customers to start calling long before the opening, hoping to be the first when we start in the morning. Each month, over 1,000 New Mexicans living on the poverty line contact our lawyers and staff for help. In many cases, we are able to quickly resolve their issues within hours, but too often we have clients who are dealing with multiple issues at once such as evictions, unemployment, domestic violence and issues. income security.

These people are assigned to one of our advocates, who works in four specialized divisions: family, consumption, housing and economic security. They are stretched and process over 5,500 cases per year. But the high volume of cases is not as frustrating as when they are forced to turn down a viable case simply because we lack resources. For more than 100 New Mexicans per month, this is their reality.

Currently, nearly 400,000 New Mexicans live in poverty and qualify for our services, and we are already seeing that the demand continues to increase. In order to help more people, we need a stronger commitment from the legislature to increase funding for the Civil Legal Services Commission, which supports nonprofit civil legal providers in New Mexico.

We need to increase our staff and we need to be able to offer a competitive salary to a limited pool of available legal talent. A recent study by New Mexico Voices for Children looked specifically at New Mexico families and their income security. In its study, Voices for Children reported that 34 percent of children in New Mexico were food insecure in 2020, up from 24 percent in 2018. And nearly 30 percent of adults in households with children had little or no confidence in their ability to pay. their next rent or mortgage payment on time.

This study helps to put into perspective some of the reasons for the growing demand for help from our association.

Fortunately, we work alongside several other organizations that are equally focused and dedicated to the mission of helping people living in poverty by helping them with their legal issues. Each year, approximately 15,000 New Mexicans benefit from direct legal services offered by Legal Aid New Mexico, and thousands more benefit from our indirect services. When we are successful in helping a client, we keep a family at home, we improve the educational outcomes of their children, and we improve the health outcomes for the family.

We help these families to put down roots in the community, which in turn helps them to earn more income and ultimately to take root more deeply in our community.

Lewis G. Creekmore is Executive Director of New Mexico Legal Aid, headquartered in Albuquerque.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

After chronic illness, San José woman seeks help to become independent

Almost two decades after leaving the Philippines for San José, Nerissa Ramirez’s life finally started to get easier.

She had climbed the assembly line at an electronics company in Fremont and bought her first car. At night, she spent time with friends or attended local meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

But then she was diagnosed with lupus – a chronic autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own organs and tissues – as well as kidney disease.

“All of a sudden I’m fighting with my body,” recalls Ramirez, 52. “It was so hard.”

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez cries as she shares the story of her struggles on October 12, 2021, at her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

In the years since that 2012 diagnosis, that fight reduced Ramirez’s independence to a fraction of what it once was. After years of working and living alone, her illness forced her to spend most of the past year in a skilled nursing facility, receiving grueling dialysis treatment four times a week, and depending on others. for tasks such as eating, bathing and using the toilet.

It was around this time that she met Tita Das, a case manager at the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, a non-profit organization that offers people with disabilities in Santa Clara County a range of free services, such as the advocacy, peer counseling and helping with the transition from hospital to independent living.

“I could see she was very sick,” Das said, “but she has that motivation, that aspiration.” Das began to think about a key question: “What can we take away from her so that her journey can end in at least one way?” “

To that end, the association hopes that donations collected through Wish Book can help make Ramirez’s life a little more comfortable.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Tita Das, Case Manager at Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, speaks during an interview at Nerissa Ramirez’s apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

His journey so far has been marred by painful setbacks. Within months of being first diagnosed with lupus, Ramirez’s energy wore off. She was forced to reduce her working hours in the electronics business and was so exhausted that she could barely move her hands or get out of bed.

As she suffered from different flare-ups, she bounced back between treatments, even going through chemotherapy at one point. A bright spot came in January 2018, when Ramirez finally obtained U.S. citizenship and planned to return home to her home province in the Philippines to reunite with her mother for the first time in 25 years.

Shortly before his arrival, his mother passed away.

“I’ve never seen her, for how many years?” Ramirez said, covering his face with both hands as tears rolled down his cheeks. “I’m so sad – very, very sad.”

She has spent this winter in the Philippines, trying to follow the advice of her doctors to stay stress free and take advantage of the warm weather. The following fall, an unexpected glimmer of hope appeared: Thanks to church friends, she met a man and they started talking every day. After a few months of dating, they got married.

It was this sense of liveliness that Das and the rest of the SVILC team noticed when they first met Ramirez. FaceTiming her husband back in the Philippines before going to bed and eating with friends.

“Even though I’m in this kind of situation, I really, really want to live a normal life like everyone else,” Ramirez said.

Working together under the Section 811 Federal Disability Assistance Program, SVILC was able to secure Ramirez a two-bedroom apartment in San Jose and she left the nursing home in August. Since then, the cozy apartment she shares with a caretaker has been lovingly decorated, with a large portrait of a lush cascading island reminiscent of the Philippines.

But depending so much on others creates constant challenges: Sometimes the van that transports Ramirez to and from dialysis is late, forcing the center to cut his treatment short. Other times, he drops her off in front of his apartment building, too far away to walk the long hallway to the elevator unassisted.

“I am crying, but I have to be patient,” Ramirez said of these cases. ” I can not do anything. Just be patient and keep talking to the right person who can help me.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Afternoon light shines on Nerissa Ramirez as she spends time in her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group )

Ramirez and Das seek help from Wish Book readers to secure his first motorized wheelchair, which would ensure Ramirez is never left stranded outside his apartment. And to make it easier to access and return to dialysis sessions, they are also looking for help buying a car to refurbish with manual controls.

There is one more thing: a plane ticket for her husband to emigrate from the Philippines. Ramirez – who has already been approved to be her godfather – took an affectionate look at the bench she placed in the kitchen so they could dine side by side.

Until she arrives, she said, she will remain “positive, positive, positive.”

“Whatever happened, it’s happened before,” Ramirez said. “We have to keep moving forward. “

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez chats with her husband, who lives in the Philippines, at his new apartment in San Jose on October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

THE WISH BOOK SERIES
The Wish Book is an annual series of The Mercury News that invites readers to help their neighbors.

TO WISH
Donations will help Nerissa Ramirez – a client of the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center – purchase a motorized bariatric wheelchair, power recliner, used vehicle with manual controls as well as a one-way trip from the Philippines to San José. Objective: $ 23,700.

HOW TO GIVE
Donate at wishbook.mercurynews.com or send the coupon by mail.

ONLINE SUPPLEMENT
Read more Wish Book stories, view photos and videos at wishbook.mercurynews.com.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

New Catawba College graduate Madison Kluge leads Salisbury towards sustainability goals – Salisbury Post

By Natalie Anderson
[email protected]

SALISBURY – Newly graduated Madison Kluge from Catawba College became the city’s first sustainability coordinator earlier this year, and she stepped up to help transform the goals of a more sustainable lifestyle into reality.

Kluge, 21, graduated from Catawba College earlier this year with a degree in environment and sustainability. She began an internship with the Salisbury Public Works Department in February before assuming a full-time role as Sustainability Coordinator in May. In 2020, she also completed an internship at Bread Riot, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local farmers and providing access to locally produced food. Kluge said she was still a volunteer for Bread Riot.

Also during his stay in Catawba, Kluge did an internship at the school’s Environmental Center for over two years. She said her teachers helped guide her to the position she currently holds, which suits her well as she enjoys coordinating and collaborating with multiple groups.

Kluge, from Maryland, said she was living in Mocksville when her sister decided to attend Catawba College, which resulted in several trips to Salisbury with the option to explore while her sister was in class.

“I fell in love with the city, the culture it has here, the possibility of growth and the good people,” Kluge said.

Much of his work now requires him to strengthen relationships with city, county, and nonprofit organizations, in addition to strengthening environmental education and awareness of sustainable living.

Kluge is working with city staff to help draft the Forward 2040 plan, which aims to frame priorities and decisions over the next 20 years as Salisbury. In addition to this, Kluge is responsible for working on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of Salisbury City Council.

“I help steer the city towards a sustainable mindset,” Kluge said. “And put the goals they have in mind into perspective and make them come true.”

In March, board members adopted a set of goals for 2021 following a goal setting retreat in February. Among the priorities for the city’s infrastructure and human capital was the focus on reducing waste and promoting efficiency as well as improving infrastructure to promote foot and bicycle transport. In addition, council members have indicated that they want to support public transit for neighboring communities and explore alternative modes of transportation.

Also this year, the city used an amount of $ 818,000 Volkswagen Public transportation / facility shuttle program gdiatribe from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to purchase two electric buses for Salisbury Transit. Kluge said finding and applying for such grants is another part of his job. She is currently working to obtain a community subsidy for waste reduction from the NCDEQ.

Kluge told Salisbury that much of the thinking “towards sustainability” is already in place among residents and staff, which is part of what attracts him to the position. She said she is often pushed by older residents and colleagues who want to see Salisbury flourish with things such as increased use of electric vehicles and improved air quality.

“It is really my colleagues and community members who inspire me to help Salisbury follow this green vision,” she said.

Although her role falls under the Public Works Department, Kluge said she often works with communications and planning staff.

Current projects include a new Sustainability Salisbury newsletter, the first edition of which will be launched in January. This newsletter will provide more information and education for a sustainable lifestyle in Salisbury. She is also working to roll out more sustainability education through social media apps like TikTok and Instagram.

Other initiatives Kluge is working on include increasing awareness of waste, recycling, composting and waste prevention during the holiday season, promoting city and county parks, and working with neighboring schools to implement more sustainability-oriented programs. In 2022, the city will launch a nature city challenge in the spring on the occasion of Earth Day. City Nature Challenge is an event that takes place across the country, where local residents take photos and make observations of nature in their area and support the city’s naturalists.

Among its long-term goals is establishing a more robust internship program where students from Catawba, for example, can intern with the city to conduct research on sustainability, which is beneficial to the community. both for the city and students interested in careers related to sustainable development.

Eventually, Kluge said she would like to see the city’s composting program expanded to accept more types of waste. Creating a carbon inventory to assess how much carbon the city sees is another long-term goal that requires a lot of training that it is currently undergoing.

Additionally, another goal is to work with businesses to create a business alliance and neighborhood alliance with established sustainability goals, including increased recycling and waste reduction initiatives.

Kluge suggests that city residents take advantage of the free compost available at the Grants Creek Composting Facility, located at 1955 Grubb Ferry Road. Residents can pick up the compost generated from the previous year’s yard waste on Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact [email protected] or call 704-638-5260.

Contact reporter Natalie Anderson at 704-797-4246.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Morning Pointe ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events raise over $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation

Morning Pointe’s “Seniors Got Talent” presentation events across Tennessee and Kentucky raised more than $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation among four events in 2021, after a one-year hiatus in the series. annual fundraiser at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Over 100 seniors danced, sang and performed their way onto the big stage this year to raise funds for the philanthropic arm of Morning Pointe Senior Living founded by Greg A. Vital and J. Franklin Farrow, healthcare entrepreneurs for seniors of Tennessee.

The 501 (c) 3 nonprofit public service organization was established in 2014 to deliver caregiver support programs, sponsor education awareness events, and fund clinical scholarships to advance caregivers. care for the elderly in the South East.

“Morning Pointe’s ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events are flagship events in our four main markets, and we knew this year was going to be very special because we couldn’t have it last year,” said Mr. Vital, President of Morning Pointe. Life of the elderly. “So many of Morning Pointe’s sponsors and friends have stepped up in 2021 to help seniors showcase their talents on the theater stage. ”

Building on a 10-year tradition that began at Morning Pointe of Hixson, Seniors Got Talent events are the Morning Pointe Foundation’s primary fundraising activity as they seek to help develop the workforce. workforce and fill the pipeline of future senior nursing associates.

In total, the four events in Lexington (Ky.), Chattanooga, Franklin and Knoxville raised over $ 60,000 to support the mission of the Morning Pointe Foundation. The main sponsors include the East
Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Middle Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Propel Insurance, First Horizon Bank, CHI Health at Home, and RBA Employee Benefits Advisors.

Many others have helped make performing live on a theater stage a reality for these seniors, many of whom have only dreamed of something like this. The talent spectrum included artists such as a ventriloquist, a couple of tap dancers, a dance troupe, a choir and several bands, singers and musicians, all aged 62 and over.

“What can I say, it was an amazing experience. It was wonderful and made me want to cry, ”said Jan Douglas, 78-year-old singer-songwriter and one of the big winners.

Morning Pointe Senior Living, headquartered in Chattanooga, develops, owns and manages
35 Morning Pointe Assisting Life, Self-Care and The Lantern in Morning Pointe Alzheimer’s Center of Excellence communities in five southeastern states.

“This is what it is about: presenting an abundance of talented seniors on the biggest stage of their lives. while proving that age is really just a number. You can still dance, sing and show off your talent until retirement, ”said Mr. Vital. “We thank all of our sponsors for so generously allowing the Morning Pointe Foundation to provide much needed opportunities for nursing students. while providing support to caregivers and drawing attention to important health issues for older people. “


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Bay Area Nonprofit seeks 300 volunteers to participate in study on sla

Bay Area nonprofit dedicated to advancing research into an incurable – and deadly – disease of the nervous system is looking for an additional 300 people by the end of this month to participate in the largest research project ever carried out on the disease.

EverythingALS has already recruited nearly 700 people this year in a national speech study that aims to collect quantifiable data on some of the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Gehrig was a New York Yankees player who was diagnosed with a rare degenerative disease at age 36 and died in 1941 just before his 38th birthday.


An estimated 30,000 Americans are living with ALS, which results in a widespread loss of muscle control as nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed.

The first symptoms range from twitching, cramps, and weakness to difficulty chewing and slurred speech. Patients usually do not live more than five years after the first signs of the disease appear.

“With 1,000 participants, which is the largest group ever recruited to perform a neurological assessment of people with ALS, we are reinventing the research platform by using a patient-centered citizen science approach to get things done 1 000 times faster. EverythingALS co-founder Indu Navar said in a press release.

A smaller study on speech earlier this year collected data that only recently led to the identification of breathing patterns and mouth movements that differ significantly between healthy individuals and patients with ALS, including including those which are pre-symptomatic.

Now, EverythingALS wants to have at least 1,000 participants on board by Thanksgiving in its so-called “Speech Bucket Challenge” in the hopes that the larger trial will validate the link between ALS and speech abnormalities.

As the muscles of the face lose their flexibility, it becomes more and more difficult to open the mouth wide enough and to use the tongue to form certain sounds. The throat muscles also contract, limiting the amount of air that must pass over the vocal cords for someone to speak.

The study is carried out remotely through web-based computer software that records and analyzes the speed and depth of participants’ breathing as well as the volume of their voice when speaking into a microphone.

Anyone with an Internet connection, webcam, and microphone can participate in the project, which is open to people with or suspected of having SLA as well as healthy people who can serve as witnesses.

Volunteers converse with an avatar – a virtual assistant called Tina – while a webcam and microphone record their speech and facial gestures for the Modality.ai software to analyze.

Supporters of the study note that so far the number of ALS patients involved in the research has been low as they often have difficulty getting to the facilities where the work is being performed.

But most have smartphones and computers, making remote data collection a viable option.

For more information or to join the study, email [email protected] or call (650) 833-9100. To learn more about the organization, visit Everythingals.org.

Copyright © 2021 Bay City News, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication, redistribution, or redistribution without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited. Bay City News is a 24/7 news service covering the Greater Bay Area.

Copyright © 2021 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, rebroadcasting, or any other reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Non-profit organization plans to build village of 50 small houses for homeless veterans at OKC

A Kansas City-based nonprofit focused on ending veteran homelessness plans to expand to Oklahoma City.

The Veterans Community Project announced last week that it will build 50 small homes, each under 300 square feet, on a property on North Phillips Avenue, between Northeast 26th and 28th Streets.

The property will also house a community center and an awareness center.

“What we are doing is we are really restarting the transition from military to civilian from day one,” said VCP Chairman Jason Kander. “No matter how long you’ve been homeless, no matter how long you’ve been fighting, let’s do this again. ”

In recent years, Oklahoma City’s homeless population has increased, according to a 2020 city survey. Veterans make up about 10% of the city’s homeless population.

“10% means 150, 160, 170 homeless vets on our streets or in our shelters every night,” said The Homeless Alliance executive director Dan Straughan.

The nonprofit model includes on-site services and transitional housing for homeless veterans. After receiving treatment and help, Kander said residents of the mini-houses were transitioning to permanent housing.

In Kansas City, Kander said 85% of their residents have moved into a permanent living situation.

Social, legal and other services help with their transition, which are provided by local groups and volunteers.

“A big part of the reason we come to Oklahoma City is because we have identified Oklahoma City as a place that has the capacity to provide this level of service and this level of passion to veterans,” Kander said.

A spokesperson for VCP said the nonprofit did not yet have a construction schedule.


Source link

read more
1 2 3 11
Page 1 of 11