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Non profit living

Non profit living

Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: [email protected]

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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Non profit living

Volunteers wanted for the local nonprofit’s “Dinner Club” to feed terminally ill patients

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides a community of hope, healing and compassion for those facing serious illness or death with a comfortable living space and family-like care.

Individuals, families and groups are currently providing dinner for residents of Welcome Home of Chattanooga. The love and compassion of the volunteers who provide the meals saves Welcome Home over $10,000 a year and helps residents feel welcome and someone cares.

As Welcome Home expands its reach and services in the Chattanooga area to help more residents, more volunteers will be needed. Volunteers can join the lunch club by contacting welcometochattanooga.org.

The organization’s dinner club allows families, churches and restaurants to bring a meal to residents one evening a month. As a result, almost every night of the month, Welcome Home hosts a Community Dinner which allows residents, staff and volunteers to eat together.

Due to the pandemic, adjustments have been made with the club dinner; many volunteers now drop off dinner or have dinner delivered. General manager Sherry Campbell says the dinner club started organically with a few volunteers providing meals a few nights a week. She says it has now become an essential part of their daily routine.

“We have all experienced loneliness and loss of connection, and it is important to know that we are part of a community larger than ourselves. There are people who care about us and love us. is what our dinner club is all about. We sit around the table, tell life stories, talk about our favorite bands and music, and tease each other. It’s about creating a camaraderie,” Campbell said.

Camaraderie is why volunteer Christie Petty got involved with Welcome Home of Chattanooga four years ago. “My whole family is in Ohio and my kids aren’t home. I’m a very outgoing person and love having the company of the residents,” Petty said.

She heard about the association through a resident who stopped by her work. “I believe God sent him to me. He told me he was staying at Welcome Home and told me everything the staff do for him. Then he told me he was terminally ill. I immediately went to the nonprofit to find a way to help. I don’t know who benefits more from this club, the residents or me.

She provides two meals a month.

Learn more about Welcome Home of Chattanooga:

Welcome Home of Chattanooga is expanding to eventually accommodate ten residents on Quiet Creek Trail. The second phase of the construction project will begin at the end of January. The project will cost around $500,000. If you would like to donate or volunteer to help with the expansion, you can do so online at welcometochattanooga.org.

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Non profit living

Rising adoption of DAO and NFT for just causes is a positive indicator: Raj Chowdhury

Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better.

Raj Chowdhury, blockchain pioneer and founder of HashCash Consultants, foresees increased use of blockchain-based digital transformations for humanitarian, philanthropic and social purposes. Throughout 2021, decentralization has been key to the growth of DAOs, NFTs, the Metaverse, and the future Web 3.0.

Decentralized Autonomous Organizations, or DAOs, take full advantage of the lack of hierarchy by operating on coded smart contracts. Notable global examples involving the use of digital tokens and crowdfunding to make social and economic contributions include streaming projects, independent platforms, charities, and many more. A recent DAO project raised more than $40 million to acquire an early copy of the US Constitution at auction, despite being outbid by a private collector.

Chowdhury has a positive outlook on current market trends and the upcoming future. “Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better,” he says in reference to the growing adoption of blockchain applications for non-profit purposes.

A global consciousness to make the world a better place brings together collectors and crypto enthusiasts. Projects have been launched to help fund cancer research, save the environment and fight poverty. Organizations like UNICEF and the American Red Cross accept donations of crypto assets.

“The growth of technological progress as well as the losses associated with the pandemic direct a collective force towards the social and economic betterment of people

Worldwide,” Chowdhury said.

American HashCash consultants led by Chowdhury have been involved in medicine and space research. Over the years, the company has been actively involved in projects boosting financial inclusion, low-cost remittances and COVID-19 vaccine distribution, as well as child labor prevention and business support/ African nonprofits with blockchain funding channels.

Blockchain innovations such as DAOs, Metaverse, and NFTs, touted as the next global game changers, already hold great promise for social, environmental, and financial betterment. The future can expect more philanthropic efforts and collaborations through charitable blockchain projects.

Raj Chowdhury is the Managing Director of HashCash Consultants and a Blockchain pioneer. Raj pioneered the first interbank implementation of blockchain technology trade finance and remittance transfers between two of the world’s largest banks. Raj is a prominent voice in the Blockchain and Cryptocurrency space and actively engages with policy makers in this area. He is a contributor to Economic Times, Business World, CNNMoney and advises industry leaders on Blockchain adoption. Raj had been a research associate at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Lab. He is a member of Asha Silicon Valley, a non-profit association committed to the education of children in emerging countries. Author of the book “The Dark Secret of the Silicon Valley”, Raj is an investor in blockchain and cryptocurrency companies and an active member of the philanthropic community.

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Holiness of Life Sunday: Practical Pro-Life Resources for Kentucky Baptists | Baptist life

Kentucky Baptist Convention churches across the Commonwealth will join other Southern Baptist churches across the country on Sunday in celebrating and affirming the sanctity of human life – that every person is made in the image of God. .

As you consider how your church can actively uphold the sanctity of life, explore these practical resources:

Q: I would like to partner with a local pregnancy center. How can I locate the closest one?

A: There are nearly 50 Pregnancy Support Centers located throughout Kentucky, and each depends on the financial, volunteer, and prayerful support of local churches. Visit kybaptist.org/pregnancy-resource-centers/ for a list.

Q: Members of my church are interested in sidewalk counseling at the nearest abortion clinic. Where can we train?

A: Speak For the Unborn equips local churches for holistic, gospel-centered pro-life ministry driven by love and seduction. They provide training to congregations interested in counseling women preparing to enter abortion clinics. Learn more at speakfortheunborn.com.

Q: I am unable to adopt or foster and my funds are limited. How can I serve orphans and foster families?

A: Orphan Care Alliance, a Louisville-based ministry that equips and connects Christians with opportunities to serve children in need, recruits believers to serve as life coaches for teens in Kentucky’s foster care system.

After completing orientation training, life coaches are paired with a teen and are expected to spend at least one hour with them once a week for a calendar year, sharing the love of Christ, setting goals, and offering encouragement. . Life coaches are the only unpaid adult in a foster child’s life, a role the Orphan Care Alliance describes as “integral.” Visit orphancarealliance.org for more information on their various ministries.

Q: Our church wants to support foster care and orphan care ministries. What organizations exist in the state?

A: The Baptist Convention of Kentucky is a longtime partner of Sunrise Children’s Services, a Christ-centered nonprofit organization that provides therapeutic foster care, therapeutic treatment, and community services to children in Kentucky. For more information on how you can partner with Sunrise, visit sunrise.org.

All God’s Children in Nicholasville also works with foster children in Kentucky. The Christian ministry offers counselling, daycare, independent living program and training for foster parents. Find out how to volunteer, pray and give on kyagc.org.

Q: There are women in our church who have had abortions, and we want to support them as they heal. Are there Bible studies or small group materials for post-abortion women?

A: Letting go of the secret is a study offering biblical healing to post-abortion women and is frequently used by pregnancy centers and local churches. Visit abandoningthesecret.com for more information.

SaveOne is a ministry offering help and healing to men, women and family members who have been affected by a past abortion. They offer training, small group studies, and resources for churches. Learn more at saveone.org/churches.

And Embrace Grace offers a program and training for churches to create support groups for women who have chosen life for an unplanned pregnancy. A KBC church has already successfully started an Embrace Grace group. Visit kissgrace.com for more details.

Q: What is KBC doing to equip churches for pro-life ministry?

A: The Kentucky Baptist Convention launched the Friends of Life Kentucky initiative to mobilize Kentucky Baptists to support pregnant women and advocate for unborn children.

While the initiative is still in development, churches can expect regional conferences, active support of a proposed pro-life constitutional amendment in Kentucky, and a survey of attitudes and perspectives that will shape the strategy. across the convention. Follow the ongoing initiative at friendsoflifeky.org.

Q: Where can I find updates on pro-life issues in Kentucky?

A: Subscribe to our newsletter, The Morning Briefing, for weekly articles on the most relevant pro-life issues here in the state.

From updates on pro-life legislation to monthly reports on the number of abortions to personal stories of families impacted by unplanned pregnancies, Kentucky Today is committed to providing coverage on abortion, the adoption, foster care and other pro-life topics.

Tessa Redmond reports on pro-life issues for Kentucky Today. She is a member of First Baptist Church in Taylorsville, Kentucky, where her husband serves as minister of music and youth.

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Non profit living

New CEO of Lawndale Christian Health Center tackles health inequities in the neighborhood where he grew up

NORTH LAWNDALE – The Lawndale Christian Health Center has appointed Pastor James Brooks as CEO of the community clinic.

Brooks was previously the chief administrator of the community health center ministry. Brooks was born and raised in Lawndale and is also senior pastor at Harmony Community Church, where his father previously served as senior pastor.

Her experiences growing up in North Lawndale and coping with challenges on the West Side “give me great perspective” on the health needs of the community, Brooks said.

“This experience has informed how I will lead going forward,” Brooks said.

Since the health center grew out of the Lawndale Christian Community Church in 1984, it has always been driven by a mission to uplift the West Side. Church members initially sought to establish the health center with the goal of improving long-standing health inequalities faced by people living on the West Side by making high-quality care affordable and accessible. to residents.

“It had very humble beginnings,” Brooks said. “We are integrated into the community. This means that our residents have access to us. Our mission is to share the love of Jesus by promoting wellness in Lawndale and our neighboring communities.

What began as a small clinic and basketball court for residents to exercise has grown into one of North Lawndale’s major flagship institutions. Lawndale Christian Health Center is a safety-net hospital that accepts sliding scale payments, and 40% of patients are uninsured. 75,000 people in the area rely on Lawndale Christian Health Center for primary care, Brooks said.

The nonprofit organization operates a state-of-the-art fitness center that residents can join for just $15, as well as multiple event spaces, a seniors’ center, pharmacy, eye clinic, and several satellite clinics in the West Side. The Lawndale Christian Health Center also runs a neighborhood’s only cafe, the Green Tomato Café, “where the community can gather and have a great meal,” Brook said.

Despite major advances in improving access to health care, people in the region still face huge health disparities. According to a 2015 report from Virginia Commonwealth University, residents of parts of the West Side have an average life expectancy 16 years lower than that of inner-city residents. This gap isn’t just due to shortcomings in clinical care, the study showed: it’s also due to social conditions, including disinvestment, segregation and a lack of grocery stores.

One of Brooks’ management priorities is to build community partnerships to improve the social conditions that lead to chronic health problems. Lawndale Christian Health Center is already engaged in such initiatives, such as its medication-assisted treatment programs to support recovery from opioid addiction and its partnerships with more than 20 shelters to serve homeless people, it said. he declares.

“We want to be a better collaborator and partner with organizations that are on the ground, trying to make a difference in the social determinants of health. When we look at violence, when we look at homelessness, transportation, we want to partner with those who have that role and come in as a health care provider,” Brooks said.

Brooks also intends to follow the mantra of Lawndale Christian Community Church founder, coach Wayne Gordon, who often said, “We are better together. The health center has worked with local churches on a campaign called One Lawndale which aims to unite the black community of North Lawndale with the Latino community of Little Village as part of the common social challenges facing each neighborhood.

“Our main campus borders both communities. As an anchor institution, we have a great opportunity to bring people together and break down the walls that divide us,” said Brooks.

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Haymarket sues Itasca over village rejection of drug rehab center

The Haymarket Center on Tuesday filed a federal discrimination complaint against the village of Itasca, claiming elected officials violated civil rights laws by denying the association’s request to open a center for the treatment and recovery of blood drug addiction in the county town of DuPage.

The lawsuit opens a new legal front in a two-and-a-half-year controversy over the project. After more than 35 public hearings, Itasca administrators unanimously rejected Haymarket’s proposal in November to turn a closed Holiday Inn into a 240-bed rehabilitation center.

The complaint describes the board’s decision as “intentionally discriminatory, arbitrary, capricious, baseless and unreasonable”. The lawsuit also names Mayor Jeffrey Pruyn, the Itasca Planning Commission, Itasca Fire Protection District, Itasca Elementary School District 10 and Superintendent Craig Benes as defendants.

The complaint alleges that officials violated the Fair Housing Act and other laws that give people with substance use disorders the same rights as people with disabilities.

Federal prosecutors have also launched a separate investigation to determine whether the village is in violation of anti-discrimination laws.

Village officials did not immediately return requests for comment.

From the start, Haymarket faced an uphill battle in his second attempt to deliver treatment services within DuPage to help fight the scourge of opioid addiction. In 2020, 112 people died from opioid overdoses at DuPage, a dismal record and a 17% increase from the 96 reported in 2019.

Almost four years ago, Haymarket, a Chicago-based supplier, was turned down an offer to start a 16-bed satellite program at Wheaton.

But Haymarket met strong resistance in Itasca.

Resident opposition group argued the facility would put a strain on police and fire emergency services, despite assurances from Haymarket that it would contract with a private ambulance supplier to manage, at a minimum, the basic resuscitation calls generated by the establishment. Haymarket has also committed to contract with an additional private ambulance company if required.

“The biggest barrier we face in tackling substance use disorders is stigma – it prevents those in need from getting treatment and hinders the availability of more life-saving treatment.” Haymarket President and CEO Dan Lustig said in a statement announcing the lawsuit. “Expanding immediate access to care for people with substance use disorders, regardless of their ability to pay, has been the mission of the Haymarket Center for over 46 years. We are committed to creating a full new treatment center in an area that faces a significant shortage of treatment beds and programs as the need for these services continues to increase.

Access Living, a disability rights organization, represents Haymarket in court. The group raised the issue of ADA compliance in a June 2020 letter to village prosecutors. Two attorneys for Access Living said Haymarket should have been allowed to apply for a special use permit to operate as a healthcare facility.

Instead, Itasca officials saw the project as a request for planned development, arguing that the proposed use of the property represented mixed residential and medical use.

“The intentional and orchestrated discriminatory conduct in key government entities in Itasca is designed to interfere with the rights of the Haymarket Center, the people with disabilities it serves and their families,” said Senior Counsel for Access Living, Mary Rosenberg, in a statement. “The concerted actions to delay and deny the functioning of the Haymarket Center healthcare facility have had and will continue to have devastating consequences for those in need of treatment for substance use disorders.”

The mayor of Itasca made his first detailed comments on Haymarket’s plans by reading a statement prepared before the board of directors voted against the project.

“At first it was clear that the potential financial burden from Haymarket would be heavy on Itasca,” said Pruyn.

There was also talk of soliciting state subsidies to ease the potential financial burden on the village. But the mayor said Itasca could not count on “unknown dollars”.

“It was clear to elected officials, county officials and local officials,” said Pruyn, “that one of the smaller communities was going to have to absorb 100% of the costs, risks, and burden of maintaining d ‘a facility that would accept residents beyond Itasca. “

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Non profit living

The Bronx fire is New York City’s deadliest blaze in decades

Credit…David Dee Delgado for The New York Times

Wesley Patterson was in the bathroom just before 11 a.m. on Sunday when his girlfriend knocked on the door to say she saw flames coming out of another unit.

It only took a few moments for the apartment to fill with smoke, said Mr Patterson, who has lived in the building for 20 years.

“We were just trying to breathe,” said Mr. Patterson, 28. He rushed with his girlfriend and brother, who lives with the couple, to a back window.

He tried to open it but the frame was so hot he burned his hands. When he opened the window he started yelling at the firefighters who were helping a family in the 3M apartment. Firefighters couldn’t reach them yet, he said.

Mr Patterson said he had to keep opening and closing the window to prevent smoke from entering as he called for help.

“I was screaming, ‘Please help me! Please come and get us! ‘ “, he said.

The family tried to open the door, but the apartment was flooded with more smoke.

“I was thinking about my son and wondering if I was ever going to see him again,” Mr. Patterson said.

It was around 11:20 a.m. Mr Patterson said he and his family were taken out of the window by the fire department.

“I’m glad we made it out safe and sound, but I still can’t believe that happened,” he said.

Dana Nicole Campbell, 47, was in a nearby park, working as a gardener for the city, when one of her four teenage children called to say smoke was entering their third-floor apartment. Ms Campbell said she told them to put wet towels at the foot of the door to prevent more smoke from entering the apartment and barricading itself inside the apartment.

Then she rushed to the building and arrived in time to see her children jump out of the third floor window. They landed on a mattress and garbage bags that people had put there as a makeshift landing pad. Ms Campbell later said she was grateful her children were unharmed.

“You can be here tomorrow with broken legs,” she said. “You can’t be here tomorrow with the smoke inhaling.”

Firefighters helped Cristal Diaz escape with his two aunts, aged 49 and 65, and three cousins, from their smoky apartment on the 15th floor. Ms Diaz, who left the Dominican Republic two years ago, only took her phone and ID with her when she left. “We don’t know what to do right now, and tomorrow I’m supposed to be working,” said Ms. Diaz, who works as a cashier. The family is currently staying with friends.

Ms Diaz said she was drinking coffee, as she does every morning when disaster struck.

“I thought, will this be the last time I have coffee with my family?” Ms. Diaz, 27, recalled, still in shock.

Members of the Wague family stood at the corner of Avenue Tiebout and Rue Folin, huddled together, some under blankets, after escaping from their third-floor apartment.

Mamadou Wague was awakened by one of his children. “I get up and there is smoke in the children’s rooms,” said Mr Wague, 47.

As the family rushed out of the apartment, one of Mr Wague’s children cried that their sister, Nafisha, 8, was missing. Mr Wague rushed to her bedroom and found her sitting on her bed screaming, he said. Mr. Wague grabbed her and ran out.

Ahouss Balima, 20, lived on the ninth floor of the building, with his three younger sisters and his parents. He and his family had fallen asleep on Sunday morning when he was awakened by the sound of someone crying for help.

Mr Balima went to wake his family and they rushed downstairs, only to be told by the firefighters on the 6th floor that they couldn’t come down any further because it was too dangerous.

After finally being rescued by firefighters, one of her sisters was rushed to hospital, and she was still in critical condition on Sunday evening.

By 3:30 p.m., the fire was under control and a slight odor of smoke persisted in the air. Several residents were standing nearby. Some wore sneakers, others wore winter coats, and a few had blankets wrapped around their shoulders. A few people huddled under nearby scaffolding to escape the biting wind. Several held their phones close to their faces to assure affected family members that they were alive.


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Non profit living

Susan Ann Lacy Obituary | Star Tribune

Lacy, Susan Ann December 3, 1945 January 3, 2022 Sweet and loving Susan, younger daughter of Isabel and Eugene Lacy, sister of Patrick, (Marilyn), Jean Ryberg, (Bernie), Jack, (Diane), Michael, Mary Cohea, (Kent), several nieces, nephews and cousins, passed away peacefully from complications from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Susan loved going to church and was a member of St. Thomas the Apostle for over 70 years, attended Opportunity Partners for many years and her zest for life was working at JUUT Solon in downtown Minneapolis for 27 years. where she was much loved by all. and received awards and recognition for his service to the company. The employees there were all “Day Makers” and made Susan’s morning job so special. Living independently from the age of 50 and later receiving help from his REM care team. Susan moved to live at the Roseberry House group home, where she was once again loved and cared for. Special thanks to all the staff at Roseberry for their unwavering support to Susan and the wonderful team at the Guardian Angels Hospice who helped send Susan into the arms of her mother and father. Susan has had many Guardian Angels along the way helping her navigate life. Susan’s family is grateful to everyone we knew and those we didn’t know who took her under their wings and kept her safe. – Memorials can be sent to the Guardian Angels Hospice, Elk River, Minnesota, or any local non-profit charity of your choice. The memorial service will be announced in early spring.

Posted on January 9, 2022


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Non profit living

Live news: Rising staff absences in England over Christmas add pressure to NHS

Britain’s richest 10% own nearly half of all the country’s wealth, according to pre-pandemic data, even as inequality has remained stable for the 14 years leading up to March 2020.

A tenth of households held 43% between April 2018 and March 2020, data from the Office for National Statistics showed today, which revealed huge differences between income groups, ages and regions.

In contrast, the bottom half of the population held 9 percent. Wealth inequality as measured by the Gini coefficient, however, remained stable over the 14-year period, the ONS said.

The numbers are the most comprehensive set of data on the distribution of wealth, but exclude the period of the pandemic, when the total increased, separate data from the ONS showed.

The richest 1% of households hold more than £ 3.6million, compared to £ 15,400 or less for the bottom 10%.

There were striking differences in age, with the median wealth of those aged 55 below the statutory retirement age being around 25 times that of those aged 16 to 24.

The upper region was the South East, which has seen one of the fastest increases in average wealth since 2006. Its median wealth of £ 503,400 was about three times that of the North East, at £ 168,500. , the region with the lowest wealth. .

London has an average of £ 340,300, reflecting the lowest home ownership rate in the country, low participation in private pensions and declining median wealth in the last period. Still, he owns 15 percent of the wealth, possibly due to his higher real estate values.

The Gini coefficients, which measure inequalities, showed that London was the region with the most unequal distribution.


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