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News in Brief: It’s not too late to join the Solar Tour on Saturday; Wilmette’s birthday party is on; Golf outing on a stroll

Go Green Wilmette is leading a free tour of over a dozen Wilmette homes with solar panels from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 25.

During the visit, GGW President Beth Drucker and other homeowners will provide information on the solar power systems installed in their homes. The tour will pass through Wilmette as shown on this interactive map.

Please note that some facilities will only offer ‘curbside viewing’.

According to a press release from Go Green Wilmette, the organization and another local environmental group, Go Green Northbrook, organized their own village-wide solar tours in conjunction with the Illinois Solar Energy Association’s annual tour on September 25.


Wilmette’s 150th birthday celebrations have begun

Village President Senta Plunkett told guests at Wilmette Beach Bash that that night, September 18, marked the start of a series of events to honor the village’s 150th anniversary.

The village of Wilmette was incorporated in 1872 and, for the next year, will celebrate the 150th anniversary of that time, according to Plunkett.

“To mark this important milestone, the Village is undertaking a series of events to educate us on Wilmette’s history, to promote special aspects of our Village and, above all, to have fun,” she reportedly told the crowd. Beach Bash. “After what we have all endured over the past 18 months, we look forward to the celebration to renew and strengthen the bonds we share as friends and neighbors. I can’t think of a better place to start the celebration than here, at Beach Bash 2021, in partnership with the Ouilmette Foundation.

According to a press release from the Village of Wilmette, the Wilmette Village Council’s 150th Anniversary Planning Committee is organizing a “celebration that will foster community spirit and unity while honoring the history of the village and looking towards it. to come up “.

The events will be punctuated by a community party on September 10, 2022, at the Center du Village.

In addition to the festival, the committee is planning a series of lectures, a winter celebration, art exhibitions and projects to improve the community’s public spaces, the statement said.

For more information, visit www.wilmette150.org, email [email protected] or call (847) 853-7529.


A quartet at the annual outing

Ramblers Golf Outing raises funds for tuition assistance

Loyola Academy supporters gathered at the North Shore Country Club on September 20 for the 27th Annual Ramblers Golf Outing.

A day of fun and fundraising included a number of contests and prizes, many of which were donated by Loyola alumni.

According to a press release from Loyola, current parent and board member Kevin Lynch, John Defraytas, Willy Hendricks and Kyler Ferguson took first place in the raw competition. On the Peoria handicap system, Doug Kadison, Chris Friedrich, Michael Zera and Jim Greco took first place.

Courtney O’Connor and Chris Burke had the longest drive on the 12th hole. Kevin Willer and Brian Callahan were closest to the hairpin on the 3rd hole.

“We are grateful to our golf outing hosts Rob Banas and the Rambler members of the North Shore Country Club,” the statement said. “Their generosity and their efforts allowed us to have the best possible experience. ”

The outing’s goal, the statement said, of raising enough funds to provide a year of schooling for a student has been met. Over the past 27 years, the golf outing has raised over $ 250,000 for the tuition program.


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Six elected to the ECU Athletics Hall of Fame

GREENVILLE, NC – Six extraordinary people will be inducted into the ECU Athletics Hall of Fame on Friday November 5 at the 43rd annual installment ceremony inside Harvey Hall as part of the annual Hall of Fame / Letters Winners Weekend.

The exceptional class includes the former president of the Pirate Club and philanthropist Bill clark; former football player and head coach Ruffin McNeill, who led ECU to four bowl games in six seasons; former softball pitcher Toni Paisley and infielder Keisha Shepperson (Stewart), both of whom have won All-America accolades during their careers; and Jacob Smith, who was a member of the 1959 NAIA Pirates National Championship men’s swim team. Kelly wernert (Krainiak), a two-time all-conference artist, who becomes the first volleyball-specific player to ever be elected to the Hall of Fame.

The inductees will be publicly recognized inside Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium as part of the halftime festivities during the November 6 soccer match against Temple.

The six new inductees will bring the total membership of the ECU Track and Field Hall of Fame to 178. to themselves and to the University.

Clark (ECU ’66) is an avid supporter of ECU Athletics and has a long history of philanthropy with the Pirate Club. He pledged the principal donation of $ 1.5 million in support of the construction of a new baseball stadium that honors both Clark’s generosity and the legacy of former Pirates head coach Keith LeClair, Clark-LeClair Stadium. He also provided the main donation in support of the Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium renovation campaign, as he has been honored with the Outstanding Alumni Award and the Chancellor’s Amethyst in recent years.

McNeill (ECU ’80) was a three-year starter as the Pirates’ defensive back in the late 1970s before being named head coach in January 2010. In six seasons, McNeill led the Pirates to four appearances. in a bowl and posted the fifth highest head. Coaching victories in program history, while developing 12 first-team selections for all conferences and a trio of MVP / Player of the Year award winners. In 2013, he led ECU to just the second 10-game winning season in the program’s history.

Paisley (ECU ’10) is the most decorated player in pirate softball history. She was named U.S. Conference Pitcher of the Year for three consecutive seasons (2009, ’10, ’11) as well as the league’s Freshman-of-the-Year in 2007. In 2009, she was appointed Co-C-USA. Female athlete of the year. Paisley ended her playing career with 118 wins, 23rd– most of NCAA history, while leading ECU to consecutive conference titles in 2010 and 2011.

Shepperson (ECU ’01) won NFCA All-America honors in 2000 and 2001 and was a three-time All-Region player. She was named Big South Freshman of the Year in 1998 and won first-team honors in all conferences the following season while helping the Pirates win their first conference title and first place in the NCAA tournament. Shepperson holds career records in the program for runs, hits and doubles and has the second most stolen bases.

Smith (ECU ’60) won All-America honors in five events at the 1959 NAIA Nations Championship competition, winning silver in the 100-meter freestyle and bronze in the 50-meter freestyle. He also swam at the top of the 1959 national championship free relay team. The following year, Smith won bronze in the 100 freestyle and helped the 400 freestyle relay team to finish second.

Wernert (ECU ’07) received All-Conference USA first-team honors as a junior and senior, placing third in the league in eliminations per game in 2007. She helped the Pirates record consecutive winning seasons for the first time in a quarter century in 2005 and 2006. In second year, she led ECU to her first C-USA tournament victory. Wernert set season and career records for the winning program, which placed ninth all-time in C-USA history, at the end of her eligibility.

An interactive video listing and clips of all Hall of Fame members can be found in the lobby of the Smith-Williams Center, which opened in 2013. Photos of all Hall of Fame members are now available permanently exhibited and the 2021 dedicated class will be added. at the Hall of Fame weekend exhibit, November 5-6.

All Hall of Fame members will receive an email next week with full details of the Hall of Fame ceremony. If you are currently a Hall of Fame member and need to update your contact details, please email [email protected] with the appropriate changes.


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Haitians see the history of racist policies in the treatment of migrants

The footage – of men on horseback, appearing to use reins as whips to surround Haitian asylum seekers trying to cross into the United States from Mexico – sparked an uproar. But for many Haitians and black Americans, they are just confirmation of a deeply held belief:

US immigration policies, they say, are and have long been anti-black.

The border patrol’s treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory US policies and indignities faced by blacks, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, advocates black immigrants and civil rights leaders.

They point to immigration data which indicates that Haitians and other black migrants routinely face structural barriers to entering or living legally in the United States – and often experience disproportionate contact with the United States criminal justice system that can jeopardize their residence or accelerate their deportation.

Haitians, in particular, are granted asylum at the lowest rate of any nationality with a consistently high number of asylum seekers, according to an analysis of Associated Press data.

“Black immigrants live at the intersection of race and immigration and, for too long, have fallen through the cracks of bureaucracy and legal loopholes,” said Yoliswa Cele of the UndocuBlack Network, an organization national defense of the rights of current and former undocumented blacks.

“Now, through the videos capturing the abuses against Haitians at the border, the world has now seen for itself that not all migrants seeking a better future are treated equally when the skin color is involved. “

Between 2018 and 2021, only 4.62% of Haitian asylum seekers were granted asylum from the United States – the lowest rate among 84 groups for which data is available. Asylum seekers from the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, have an equally low rate of 5.11%.

In comparison, four of the top five American asylum seekers are from Latin American countries: El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico and Honduras. Their acceptance rates range from 6.21% to 14.12%.

Nicole Phillips, legal director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance, said racism has long been the driving force behind the US government’s treatment of Haitian immigrants.

Phillips, whose organization is on the ground helping Haitians in Texas, says it dates back to the early 1800s, when Haitian slaves revolted and gained independence from France, and continued for decades. decades of American intervention and occupation in the small island nation.

She said the United States, threatened by the possibility of its own slaves revolting, both aided the French and did not recognize Haiti’s independence for nearly six decades. The United States also loaned Haiti money so that it could, in essence, buy its independence, collecting interest while plunging the country into poverty for decades.

“This mentality and stigma against Haitians goes back to that time,” Phillips said.

The United States violently occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and supported former Haitian dictator François Duvalier, whose oppressive regime left 30,000 dead and forced thousands to flee.

While the United States has long treated Cubans with compassion – largely because of its opposition to the Communist regime – the administrations of George HW Bush and Bill Clinton have taken a hard line on Haitians. And the Trump administration ended temporary protection status for several nationalities, including Haitians and Central Americans.

Time and time again, the United States has passed immigration legislation that excluded black immigrants and Haitians, and promoted policies that unfairly undermined their legal status in the country, advocates said.

When they do manage to enter the United States, black immigrants say they face systemic racism in the American criminal justice system and American police brutality that is endemic for people across the African Diaspora.

The Black Alliance for Just Immigration, a national racial justice and immigrant rights group, largely defines black immigrants as people from countries in Africa and the Caribbean. Based on this definition, AP’s analysis of 2019 Department of Homeland Security data found that 66% of black immigrants deported from the United States were returned on criminal grounds, compared to 43% of all immigrants.

BAJI executive director Nana Gyamfi said crimes of moral turpitude, including theft or turnstile hopping, were used as partial justification for denying legal status to black immigrants. “We have people who are being kicked out because of train tickets,” she said.

Leaders of the Movement for Black Lives, a national coalition of black-led racial justice and civil rights organizations, have highlighted the treatment of Haitians at the border as a rationale for their broader demands for funding from humanitarian organizations. law enforcement in the United States.

Last year, following the murder of George Floyd, the coalition proposed sweeping federal legislation known as the BREATHE Act, which includes calls to end immigration detention, stop deportations due to contacts with the criminal justice system and to ensure due process within the immigration justice system. .

“Often in the immigration debate, black people are erased and black immigrants are erased from the conversation,” said Amara Enyia, policy researcher for the Black Lives Movement.

Ahead of a visit to the Texas migrant camp on Thursday, civil rights leaders called for an investigation into the treatment of black migrants at the border and an immediate end to the deportation of black asylum seekers.

The camp is “a catastrophic and human disgrace,” Reverend Al Sharpton said after an hour-long tour with several black American leaders in Del Rio. “We will continue to come back, as long as necessary. “

At the border and in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where hundreds of people had previously been sent on flights from the United States, Haitians said there was no doubt race played a role. major in their mistreatment.

“They catch people, they disturb us, especially Haitians because they identify us by skin,” said Jean Claudio Charles who, with his wife and one-year-old son, had stayed in a camp on the Mexican side. near Texas for fear of arrest and deportation to Haiti.

Claude Magnolie, a Haitian citizen deported from the United States this week, said he had not seen border patrol officers treating migrants of other nationalities like him and others were treated: “C ‘ is discrimination, that’s what I call it, they treat us very badly. “

And in Miami, immigrant rights advocate Francesca Menes couldn’t believe her eyes as she watched images of asylum seekers surrounded by men on horseback.

“My family is under this bridge,” Menes said, referring to a cousin, his wife and their newborn baby who recently met in a small town on the Texas border. It took Menes’ cousin two months to make the trip from Chile, where he had lived with his brothers for three years, to escape the political turmoil, violence and devastation in Haiti.

“It made me sick,” Menes said. “This did not happen with unaccompanied minors. You did not see people riding horses, essentially herding people together as if they were cattle, as if they were animals. . “

Menes’ outrage only grew, as did his fears for his family. When she overheard her mother on the phone with family members this week, Menes said she wanted nothing more than to tell them to return to Chile.

“We actually tried to discourage our families,” she said. “People are looking for a better life. And we kind of try to anchor our families: do you know what it means to be black in America?

____

AP staff members Maria Verza in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Fernando Gonzalez in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Jasen Lo in Chicago, and Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed. Morrison reported from New York. Galvan reported from Phoenix. Both are members of the AP Race and Ethnicity team. Follow Galvan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/astridgalvan. Follow Morrison on Twitter: https://twitter.com/aaronlmorrison.



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Charter committee chairman Darrick Dansby wants the party to be a force again

I wrote about the Greater Cincinnati Charter Committee for about 40 of its 97 years of existence; and, after all these years, the Chartists get cranky when I call them in the print media a “political party”.

Charter is, of course, the organization founded in 1924 to bring down decades of incompetent and corrupt government by political bosses and into the era of the board-manager form of government. The council-manager form of government, beaten and besieged as it is, exists to this day.

The Chartists prefer this rather long title to be called a political party: An independent political organization dedicated to good government.

In my mind, a political organization that has supported and promoted lists of candidates for Cincinnati City Council – and sometimes for other offices – is a political party, but they are, of course, free to call themselves what they are. wish.

Over the years, the fortune of the Charter Committee has increased and decreased on several occasions. But, in 2021, his leadership sees an opportunity to reestablish itself as a major presence at city hall – mainly due to scandals and indictments that have given city council a reputation as a breeding ground for corruption.

This year, under the leadership of a new president, Darrick Dansby, Charter is diversifying.

So far in this municipal election season, Charter has:

  • backed a candidate in a three-person race for an unexpired term in Hamilton County Municipal Court;
  • speak out against number 3, the gigantic eight-part, all-or-nothing Charter amendment that would bring about serious changes in the way city council works;
  • endorsed a very diverse slate of eight council candidates, in a difficult situation where Democratic candidates were told they could not agree to a Charter cross-endorsement.

With only one current board member vying this year who has been elected before – Democrat Greg Landsman – there are plenty of breakthrough opportunities for the massive field of 35 candidates.

Charter, it seems, is in a good position to win a few seats on the new nine-member city council.

The Charter list includes:

  • Two former charter board members to Jim Tarbell and Kevin Flynn, both recognized throughout town.
  • Two Republicans – Steve Goodin and Liz Keating – who were appointed to council seats when the indicted council members stepped down.
  • And four first-time contenders – Jackie Frondorf, whose family is well known in Westwood, the city’s largest neighborhood; Bill Frost, originally from England and an engineer who served as chairman of the Pleasant Ridge Community Council; Galen G. Gordon, an activist from the West End who is the sales manager at the Hilton Netherland Plaza Downtown; and John J. Williams, a lawyer who spent the first 12 years of his career in the city’s notary’s office.

“It’s a good, diverse slate,” Dansby said.

Election of board members is the top priority, but Dansby said the charter committee is very concerned about question 3 and is calling for a “no” vote on all of the charter changes proposed by the rep. state Tom Brinkman, who is also a Republican candidate for council. .

Number 3 would make drastic changes in the way the board does business. This would do:

  • ensure that the salaries of council members are equal to the median household income in the city. This would mean a drop in salary from $ 65,000 per year to about $ 46,000;
  • require council approval of all lawsuits brought by the city;
  • the designated replacement, which has been used to fill vacant board positions since the 1920s, whereby board members choose one or more other board members to choose their replacement, is said to have disappeared;
  • if a board member resigns or otherwise leaves the board, their place will go to 10e place finisher in the last council campaign;
  • eliminate the “pocket veto” of the mayor, where the mayor can choose never to put an item on the council’s agenda or even assign it to a committee;
  • require a one-year residency in the city to serve as mayor or council member;
  • allow individual liability of city employees for certain violations of public meetings and violations of the law on public documents;
  • allow the mayor’s dismissal.

When I spoke to Dansby about it, he did not specifically say whether there were any sections of the Charter amendment with which he and the Charter Committee disagreed.

“It’s not about the problems, it’s about the process,” Dansby said. “It was developed without any input from the community, without any public discussion of the issues.

“It’s a very dangerous thing to have so many amendments in one ballot,” Dansby said. “This is not the way it should be done. Voters should not be forced to vote all or nothing. I cannot support eight major charter changes in one fell swoop.”

Dansby said he believed it all had to do with Brinkman, who gathered more than 4,600 signatures from Cincinnati voters to put number 3 on the ballot.

“It’s just a move by Mr. Brinkman to advance his own candidacy,” Dansby said. “And I don’t like to hear him call him ‘the Brinkman Amendment.’ I don’t want to advertise him. Just call him what he is – Number 3.”

The Hamilton County Republican Party Executive Committee approved Question 3. The Hamilton County Democratic Party has taken no formal action, but party leaders are clearly opposed, as a number of Prominent local Democrats have gone to the Ohio Supreme Court in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent the number 3 from being put on the ballot.

Dansby said he was not sure how his approved board candidates were presenting themselves at No. 3.

“We allow our candidates to have their own perspective on the issues,” Dansby said.

This is certainly not the first time that the Charter Committee has taken a stand for or against a ballot issue, but if you combine that with their rather impressive roster of council candidates and the fact that they are involved in a Race to the municipal court, we are definitely seeing a version of the Charter much more aggressive than it has been in recent years.

Last week, Charter lent her support to Elizabeth A. Tye, a North Avondale attorney who worked as both a prosecutor and defense attorney, for the remaining term in District 2 of the City Court of Hamilton County.

Tye has two opponents in the race – incumbent Republican Bertha Garcia Helmick, who was appointed to the vacant municipal court post in April, and attorney Donte Johnson, the Democratic Party-backed candidate for Hamilton County. Tye is also a Democrat, but Johnson has won party support.

Dansby said Tye “has an incredible amount of experience in the legal system and, for Charter, was clearly the best choice of the three. He’s a dynamic person.”

The new chairman of Charter, a real estate agent involved with Charter for seven years, said he “focuses on bringing young people to Charter; and people who don’t necessarily just vote for a party line. We need to diversify our base and reach the 52 neighborhoods. “

Dansby itself represents something new for Charter.

Throughout its history, Charter has consistently led and supported the Black Cincinnatians – from Ted Berry and Marian Spencer to Tyrone Yates and Yvette Simpson.

But, in 97 years of existence, Charter never had an African-American president until Dansby arrived earlier this year.

“The history of this organization has been great,” said Dansby. “And I’m very proud to be a part of it.”

Already, the new president of Charter is signaling his presence. The Charter is once again a force in city politics.

Don’t call it a political party.


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Coaches share 1990s history

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ORCHARD PARK – Washington head coach Ron Rivera wasn’t quite sure what he wanted to do when his playing career with the Chicago Bears ended in 1992.

Knowing that, Rivera’s former Bears teammate Leslie Frazier, now the Buffalo Bills defensive coordinator, presented an option.

“When I was a head coach at a very small school in Chicago (Trinity International University) and Ron was trying to figure out what he wanted to do after he was done playing, I said, ‘Come on. join my team, man, you’d be a really good coach, ”Frazier recalls. “He didn’t want to coach at the time, he wanted to get into other things.”

This paddling was in the media, and Rivera worked as an analyst for WGN-TV of Chicago and also for SportsChannel Chicago covering the Bears and college football for about four years. However, in the back of his mind were the words of his former Bears teammate – with whom he won a Super Bowl after the 1985 season – that he would be a good coach, and he finally acted.

“I have a lot of history with him,” Rivera said of Frazier.

Rivera went to the Bears before the 1997 season and head coach Dave Wannstedt offered him a low-level defensive quality control position. in Washington.

“His wife (Stephanie), in fact, ended up coming to the school I was in and was the assistant basketball coach, and then eventually Ron went to do some quality control work with the Bears.” , said Frazier.

“Next thing you know, we’re both in Philadelphia as assistant coaches and I said to him, ‘Didn’t I try to tell you that you were a coach, man, and someday you’ll be head coach and a good coach? ‘ He said, ‘Yeah, yeah, I remember you telling me about it.’ So now, whenever we have the opportunity to speak, I remind him, that he owes me leftovers for hiring him in this profession, that’s for sure.

Rivera, of course, also has a close connection to Bills head coach Sean McDermott. McDermott was also on the Eagles staff under Andy Reid, and when Reid fired him after the 2010 season, Rivera – who was hired as the Carolina head coach in 2011 – brought in McDermott to be his defensive coordinator.

They worked together until 2017, when McDermott was hired by the Bills, and the two remain close, but not on Sunday when they meet for the second time as head coaches when the football team will invade Highmark Stadium.

“It started with Andy,” Rivera said. “I mean, it all goes back to 1999, because all of us – Sean and I and Leslie Frazier and the guys who on this team we all started with Andy; we all learned from him. And so a lot of the things we do are very similar. Because it is a plan, it has proven to be effective. Remember, Andy started in Green Bay and those Green Bay roots. We’re going back to San Francisco, and to San Francisco under Bill Walsh. So it’s just kind of an extension of what that tree was.

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The Rivera Panthers beat the McDermott Bills 9-3 in what was only Game 2 of McDermott’s tenure with Buffalo in 2017, and they haven’t met since.

“Ron has been one of my biggest mentors in this business,” McDermott said. “He taught me a lot. Going to Carolina, I learned a lot during those six years under Ron’s tutelage and tutelage both as a head coach and from a defensive standpoint.

“Our ties go all the way back to Philadelphia, of course. So he taught me a lot about the linebacker when I was his QC and also worked with linebackers. And then just with regard to Ron being on the other side, I have enormous respect for Ron.

Logan Thomas makes a comeback

The Bills had the athletic 6-foot-6, 250-pound tight wing in their building for nearly three seasons, but they never unlocked his potential to play the position and continued to play free agent acquisition. high priced Charles Clay.

Thomas played 24 games in 2017 and 2018, playing most of the time on special teams, and he made just 19 catches for 144 yards. He then went to Detroit before landing with Washington in 2020, and that’s when it happened for Thomas.

The football team let him go and he caught 72 passes for 670 yards and 6 touchdowns as he became one of the main weapons in attack. This year he has eight catches for 75 yards and one scoring.

“Always great to watch,” said Bills coach Sean McDermott. “We hope the players play their best football here, and I think most of them have. But in this case, we wish Logan good luck and he did a great job. Credit to him, credit to their staff. He seems to be playing his best football. And I’m happy for him. He is a great person, a great family and a guy with a high character, so happy for him, really proud of him.

A guy who wishes Thomas was still in Buffalo? Josh Allen.

“I miss him,” Allen said. “I actually talk to him a little bit more and it’s great to see what he has done. He made some amazing plays and when he was here you saw guys like that who are big, fast and ultimately smart, these guys usually find a way to stay in this league. Not only does he stick around, but he’s sort of billed himself as one of the best tight ends in this league and one of the best guys too.

Matt Milano was everywhere in Miami

Of all the things the Bills did in the offseason to polish the roster for a Super Bowl run, re-signing linebacker Matt Milano was perhaps GM Brandon Beane’s biggest decision.

Milano was an unrestricted free agent and could have signed anywhere, and probably had options, but he wanted to stay at Buffalo because he enjoys it here and believes in the culture and vision of the organization.

Beane moved on from the fact that Milano struggled to stay healthy in his first four years and focused on the fact that when he’s right he’s one of the best outside linebackers in the league. .

Milano was fantastic last week in Miami as he recorded a record seven presses according to Pro Football Focus, one of which resulted in a sack. And as always, he was a sure tackle (he only missed one tackle in two games) and was reliable on his cover shots.

“How active he was,” Frazier said when asked what stood out from the film. “I mean, he won almost every time he faced their running backs in protection. He also won his battles in passing coverage. He was everywhere at the same time. Very active and disruptive. I had a very good game. “

Dawson Knox has had a busy day

With the Bills playing 70% of their offensive snaps in Miami in 11 people (three wide, a tight end and a back), Knox has played 83% of the snaps overall, more than any other skill position player besides Josh Allen. .

He was only targeted three times and caught two passes for 17 yards, but one of them was a slippery pass from an eight-yard TD early in the third quarter that helped the Bills master the game firmly. Additionally, Knox delivered a great block that helped Devin Singletary pitch his 46-yard TD in Buffalo’s game two of the game.

Offensive coordinator Brian Daboll said Knox’s number of snaps was mainly due to the game plan, but added, “We have a lot of confidence in Dawson. He played a lot of plays for us. (Sunday) we had, I would say, a variety of staff groups, probably a little more than what we’ve had in the past before this game. And most of them involved the tight end of this game. He’s our tight end we’re looking to, so he’s had a lot of reps.

Of course, that also meant that with the Bills going four or five wide in just four plays, Gabriel Davis was largely knocked out. He was on the pitch for just 22 shots and was never targeted.

Bills OG Jack Anderson claimed by the Eagles

The Bills lost their seventh-round pick guard Jack Anderson on Tuesday when he was pulled from the practice squad by the Eagles.

Teams can protect two players per week in their practice squad, but they can only do so on Tuesday afternoon. Therefore, all players are eligible to be selected before that and the Eagles have stepped in. Anderson had been protected for the first two weeks. To replace him, the Bills re-signed OT Bobby Hart who they cut after training camp.

Anderson was a work in progress and it probably would have been the equivalent of a red shirt year for him in the NFL had he stayed in Buffalo. Because the Eagles have claimed him, he has to be on their 53-man roster, but if he were to be demoted to their training squad, the Bills, if they wanted to, could bring him back.

Sal Maiorana can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @salmaiorana.


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Russia fears Belarus from Belarus

The white-red-white colors of the historic Belarusian national flag have been adopted by the country’s pro-democracy opposition since the anti-regime protests began in August 2020 (Artur Widak / NurPhoto via REUTERS)

A specter haunts Belarus. He is not a brutal autocrat who oppresses his own people, flouts international law and threatens the country’s neighbors. Nor is it the international isolation of Belarus or the rapid collapse of the country’s economy. At least not if you read Russian media.

According to a growing number of pro-Kremlin commentators, the specter haunting Belarus is the threat of “Belarus”, that is, the promotion of Belarusian language, history and culture.

In a recent long essay for APN, a Kremlin-related publication with a nationalist bent, political commentator Sergei Shiyenko argued that, like Ukraine before it, Belarus is trying to “synthesize a new ethnicity and a national statehood project on an anti-Russian basis”.

According to Shiyenko, “Belarus is the cornerstone of the concept of creating a new nation from an isolated part of the Russian people under a state that was accidentally created at the beginning of the 20th century. Without Belarus, nation building will come to a standstill, the “Republic of Belarus” will lose its meaning. “

It was not an isolated reference. A recent information in APN called Belarusian opposition leader Svyatlana Tsikhanouskaya a “defender of Belarus”, noting that she “was in favor of expanding the use and popularization of Belarusian language and culture” .

Elsewhere, an article in Rubaltic.ru claims the Francisak Skaryna Belarusian Language Society, a civic organization established in 1989, sought “forced Belarus from all spheres of public life, including the education system”. And in an essay by Regnum, commentator Sergei Atyemenko Noted that Alyaksandr Lukashenka came to power in 1994 promising “the end of criminal and violent Belarus” of the country.

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These increasingly frequent references to Belarus share several common and historically inaccurate threads.

Just like the claims about Ukraine made by Vladimir Putin in his infamous July 2021 essay, the authors of these articles on Belarus generally argue, wrongly, that Belarus is indistinguishable from Russia. They also claim that, like Ukraine, Belarus is an artificial nation created during Soviet times. And they falsely claim that, like in Ukraine, Belarusians’ desire to be a sovereign nation with its own history, culture and language is driven by malicious and irrational “Russophobia”.

Given Russia’s growing military, economic and political footprint in Belarus, the stories about creeping Belarus may at first glance seem irrational. After all, Russia’s dominance over Belarus is arguably stronger than it ever was.

Russia and Belarus recently completed Zapad-2021 military exercises, the largest in Eastern Europe in four decades. This year, the two countries have also conducted a record number of joint military exercises, with constant rotations establishing a de facto permanent presence of Russian troops in Belarus. Moscow and Minsk are also in the process of establishment three joint training centers, including one in the Belarusian region of Hrodna, near the Polish and Lithuanian borders.

Economically, Belarus remains heavily dependent on Moscow, with its economy effectively supported by the import of heavily subsidized Russian oil and the export of refined petroleum products, as well as the export of potash fertilizers. Kremlin-linked tycoons, meanwhile, are expanding their presence in Belarus.

Politically, Lukashenka’s international isolation made him more dependent than ever on the Kremlin. And just to be sure, Putin’s regime is now actively put the pieces in place to ensure that Moscow controls the Belarusian legislature through pro-Kremlin parties.

Despite Russia’s unquestionably strong position in Belarus, the fears of pro-Kremlin commentators of Belarus are driven by trends in public opinion that show a deterioration in traditionally positive Belarusian attitudes towards Russia.

Based on a November 2020 report Chatham House Poll, 33.3% of Belarusians say integration with Russia would make Belarus more corrupt. Meanwhile, 39.4% say it would mean the end of the Belarusian state, and 45% say Belarusians can only improve their identity in a fully independent country.

Likewise, a survey carried out by the Center for Oriental Studies (OSW) based in Warsaw in late November and early December 2020 have shown that 43% of Belarusians see Russia as the greatest threat to Belarusian sovereignty and territorial integrity, the highest figure among any of the countries featured in the survey.

A clear reassessment of the country’s history and national identity is also underway. A growing part of the Belarusian public now looks at the European history of Belarus prior to its incorporation into the Russian Empire in 1796. In particular, they look to the centuries when present-day Belarus was part of the Great Duchy of Lithuania and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

From last year OSW survey, 62.2% of Belarusians think their country should be inspired by periods when they were not ruled by Russia, with 39.7% citing the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, 6.3% identifying the Polish Commonwealth Lithuanian and 16.2% citing the People’s Republic of Belarus, the short-lived attempt to establish an independent state in 1918. Meanwhile, only 28 percent named the Soviet Union.

As the Kremlin tightens its grip on the Lukashenka regime, the Belarusian people are turning increasingly to the west. Seen from Moscow, it may look like an anti-Russian campaign by Belarus. But in reality, what we are witnessing is a European nation rediscovering itself. Like the Ukrainians before them, the Belarusians are continuing the break-up of the Soviet Union today.

Brian Whitmore is a Non-Resident Principal Investigator at the Eurasia Center at the Atlantic Council, Assistant Professor of Practice at the University of Texas at Arlington, and host of The Power Vertical Podcast.

Further reading

The opinions expressed in UkraineAlert are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Atlantic Council, its staff or its supporters.

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UkraineAlert is a comprehensive online publication that regularly provides information and analysis on the development of politics, economy, civil society and culture in Ukraine.

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The Eurasia Center mission is to strengthen transatlantic cooperation by promoting stability, democratic values ​​and prosperity in Eurasia, from Eastern Europe and Turkey in the West to the Caucasus, Russia and Central Asia to ballast.


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Michael McDowell has a lot to get to Las Vegas

CarParts.com will support the team’s historic push

MOORESVILLE, North Carolina, September 21, 2021 / PRNewswire / – While Michael McDowell and CarParts.com’s No.34 team may not be in the championship race, the team still has a long way to go, including making Front history. Row Motorsports (FRM).

Michael McDowell ready for the Las Vegas round

FRM has a best result of the season of 16e in 2016, the last season the organization competed in the NASCAR Cup Series playoffs. McDowell now wants to set a new high score for FRM. The No.34 team has been in the top 20 in points all season, with five top 10s, two top five and a Daytona 500 championship. McDowell Head towards Las Vegas 43 out of 15 pointse.

CarParts.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: PRTS) will support the end-of-season push this Sunday at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. CarParts.com will return its familiar primary colors to No.34.

CarParts.com offers a mobile-friendly, mobile-friendly shopping platform that connects drivers with the parts they need to get from point A to point B with confidence. With over one million square feet of warehouse space, the company stocks a variety of collision, repair, maintenance, tool and accessory products, including premium brands such that MOOG®.

By constantly introducing design innovations that extend product life and simplify installation, MOOG® has earned its reputation as a problem solver in the chassis industry. The brand is committed to producing problem-solving suspension parts as well as award-winning technical support and training materials.

McDowell is proud to have CarParts.com on board to support its best season.

“We cannot do what we do without the support of all of our partners, such as CarParts.com,” said McDowell. “We’ve had a great season, but it’s not over yet. There are still seven races left, which means seven more opportunities to improve and break records in FRM. There have been a lot of positives from this. season and there is still more to do We want to make history and we are determined that CarParts.com be part of it.

McDowell heads to Las Vegas Motor Speedway with a better finish of 17e Last year.

“There is nothing wrong with the great season for Michael and the Front Row Motorsports team,” said Houman Akhavan, Marketing Director at CarParts.com. “We are proud of Michael and his success, and we admire his willingness to make even more impact for himself and his team. It’s the same philosophy we have at CarParts.com: to strive to provide the best parts to fellow drivers. “

Sunday’s race will be televised live on NBCSN at 7 p.m. ET. For more information, visit CarParts.com.

About CarParts.com
With over 25 years of experience and over 50 million parts delivered, we’ve streamlined our website and supply network to better serve the way operators get the parts they need. Using the latest technology and design principles, we’ve created an easy-to-use, mobile-friendly shopping experience that along with our own nationwide distribution network lowers brick and mortar supply chain costs. and provides quality parts at an affordable price.

CarParts.com (NASDAQ: PRTS) is headquartered at Torrance, California.

About Front Row Motorsports
Front Row Motorsports (FRM) is a NASCAR Cup and Camping World Truck Series winning organization and 2021 Daytona 500 champions. The team was founded in 2004 and is owned by a successful entrepreneur, Bob jenkins. FRM presents the # 34 and # 38 NASCAR Cup Series teams as well as the # 38 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series team – from its Mooresville, North Carolina Headquarter. Visit teamfrm.com and follow FRM on social media: Twitter on @Team_FRM, Instagram on @team_frm and Facebook on facebook.com/FrontRowMotorsports.

Contact on CarParts.com:
Cory burns
Vice-President, Accounts – Kahn Media
Email: [email protected]

Front row contact for motorsports:
Mac Mac Leod
Manager, Public Relations
Mobile: 704-860-1154
Email: [email protected]

Cision

Cision

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SOURCE CarParts.com, Inc.


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Military historians fight boycott of Texas meeting

The Society for Military History is divided over whether to hold its annual conference in Texas next spring, as long planned, in light of the state’s new six-week abortion ban and other controversial laws regarding abortions. voting rights and transgender youth.

Debate over the location of the conference has intensified in recent days, following a letter to members from Peter Mansoor, company president and general chairman Raymond E. Mason Jr. in military history at Ohio State University. Arguing against moving the conference, Mansoor wrote to his fellow military historians that “there are good reasons to continue on our present course. Moving the conference to this late date would cause serious financial damage to the company, ”up to $ 90,000 in contract cancellation penalties. Hotel workers and local businesses would also be affected, he said.

Beyond the cost, Mansoor wrote: “We are an inclusive organization that includes members of different political views, races, genders, professional jobs, religious views and other attributes. To be truly inclusive, the company must be non-partisan and apolitical and make decisions based on the company’s mission.

“Taking action against Texas law,” he argued, “would take us beyond” the company’s mission of advancing military history, “in politics.”

Mansoor based his opinion, in part, on a policy on public statements that the company’s board of directors adopted under the Trump administration. Prior to adopting this policy, the company’s board signed a statement from the American Historical Association condemning Trump White House’s 2017 travel ban from a number of predominantly Muslim countries. Dozens of other historic organizations have also signed on to the AHA statement. But in the face of criticism from a minority of its members that the company had acted in a politically inappropriate manner, the board voted to limit other public statements to those involving exceptional circumstances, as determined by the board of directors of the company, and only when these circumstances affect the mission of the company.

Mansoor, who declined a request for an interview, said no decision regarding the conference had been made and that the council would meet on Oct. 11 to discuss the matter. Yet some members argued that the publication of a letter on company header expressing a firm opinion against moving the conference suggests that a decision has already been taken. In addition, members have argued in discussions that now spill over to social media. Isn’t Mansoor’s letter a political statement in itself – the kind of statement he argues society shouldn’t make? And isn’t doing nothing to move the conference a political decision?

“By declaring that you will not make a statement about political fighting, you are politically declaring that you find certain points of view acceptable and that you welcome them,” tweeted Adam H. Domby, associate professor of history at the University of Domby. ‘Auburn. organization. “It would have been better not to say anything.

“Military history is women’s history is political,” tweeted another military historian. Another said: “This letter explains how @SMH_Historians is going to lose a generation of young historians.”

Barbara Keys, professor of history at Durham University in Britain and former president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, a sister organization that shares some membership with the Society for Military History, said Inside higher education On Monday, she was “shocked to see that the chairman had sent a letter, on company letterhead, expressing his personal opinion on an issue the board had not discussed.”

If something similar happened elsewhere, Keys explained, “the council would likely ask the president for an apology and retraction and call a council meeting to make the policy choice.”

She added: “It also seems problematic to me that the president is citing a ban on political statements while making what is essentially a political statement. “

Military historian Chris Levesque, librarian at the University of West Florida, questioned the legitimacy of the political statement policy in the first place, claiming in a series of tweets that the company had authorized a fraction of its members – those who were upset by the 2017 incident – to “force a change in its policy by taking even narrow political positions”. This recent “debacle,” he said, referring to the debate and the letter from Texas, “is a legacy of that decision.”

In his letter, Mansoor, a retired US Army colonel, did not rule out influencing the legislation in question. “The council recognizes that there may be ways to explore legislation through the prism of military history, and I encourage submissions from panels or roundtables on these topics,” he wrote. , noting that the company had extended its proposal submission date to accommodate additional ideas. But if Mansoor’s opinion wins, those talks will take place in Texas.

From Mansoor’s perspective on conference travel costs, business organizations tend to sign event space and hotel contracts years in advance, and they risk serious financial losses by canceling them. At the same time, professional organizations in the humanities and social sciences generally do not hesitate to tackle the political questions that their members put forward. The reluctance of society may be influenced by the US military’s tradition of apolitics. Many members have had military careers or worked in military institutions, or both.

At the same time, this type of apoliticalism can risk running counter to society’s goals of inclusion, both in terms of what is viewed and valued as military history and who the members of the military are. group.

Some members are concerned that pregnant women traveling to Texas for the conference could put their health at risk in the event of a medical emergency requiring the full range of reproductive health options. Others object to spending time or money in a state with such laws in place or legislation on the table. Others still see the potential to influence policy. A military history conference, which typically attracts 600 to 700 academics, is very unlikely to make a difference. But a larger conference boycott movement, of which the company may be a part, is another story. The boycott of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of North Carolina, for example, was factored into that state’s repeal of a “toilet bill” that divides transgender people in 2017.

Kara Dixon Vuic, Master Corporal. Benjamin W. Schmidt, professor of war, conflict and society in 20th century America at Texas Christian University and a director and therefore a member of the board of the society, said on Monday that the board wished it could meet earlier than on Oct. 11 to discuss both the issue of conference venue and reporting policy, but that she was unable to respond to busy international member schedules prior to this time.

In the meantime, she said, “We take members’ concerns about these two issues very seriously – as well as the broader issues they have raised related to organizational governance, communication, transparency and inclusiveness. We welcome comments and concerns from our members and look forward to meaningful discussions.

Gregory Daddis, USS Midway Chair in Modern United States Military History at San Diego State University and other administrator and board member, said the ongoing debate “shows how academic societies should be absolutely committed to diversity and inclusion while aspiring to be non-partisan in our hyper-politicized time. He also said it was “incredibly important” to note that many members’ concerns are not just “political” “, but rather” moral and ethical, intensely personal and absolutely legitimate “.

Daddis, who is relatively new to the board, said he was “encouraged by the number of our directors who take the genuine and justifiable concerns of our members seriously and want to do the right thing.” for them. These behind-the-scenes efforts are often lost in the passionate hyperbole of social media. “

For now, Daddis has said he plans to attend the spring conference, but “in a way that highlights the legitimate concerns of our members who think the current wave of Texas laws are against rights. basic human and civilians “.



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“Roe” Balances as Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Abortion Arguments in Mississippi on Dec. 1

The United States Supreme Court has scheduled oral argument on December 1, 2021 in the term’s most significant abortion case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The Mississippi lawsuit is aimed squarely at the heart of the historical precedent Roe v. Wade who has banned the total ban on abortion in the United States since 1973.

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch celebrated the announcement in a Press release today, reaffirming the Mississippi case that the precedent Roe “strings together a view of decades-old facts, so that while science, medicine, technology and culture have all advanced rapidly since 1973,” said Fitch, “With Dobbs, the Supreme Court can return decision-making on abortion policy to elected leaders and enable people to empower women and promote life.

The director of the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, Shannon Brewer, explains that access to abortion is about equity. “A woman who is denied an abortion is more likely to live in poverty even years later. Photo by Ashton Pittman

Shannon Brewer, director of the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the only active abortion clinic in Mississippi and the institution in the crosshairs of this case, wrote in an editorial earlier this year that overthrowing Roe would have the exact opposite effect.

“Abortion is absolutely a matter of racial and economic justice. … The laws are inherently racist and classist; they keep blacks and browns down. And the research is clear: A woman who is denied an abortion is more likely to live in poverty even years later, ”Brewer wrote.

“The right to life through fertilization”

Dobbs will be the first abortion case to go to a formal Supreme Court hearing following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a liberal activist and ongoing abortion rights advocate. Ginsburg’s replacement Amy Coney Barrett has a history of anti-abortion sentiment. In 2006, she signed an amendment of the “right to life from fertilization to natural death”.

The tension around Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Clinic only rose this month when the United States Supreme Court allowed the application of a Texas law which has banned the vast majority of abortions in the state. In response to the Whole Woman’s Health v. Jackson, the court declined to rule on the constitutionality of the law, which implemented a $ 10,000 bounty for individuals to hunt down abortion providers for litigation, as well as those who “help or encourage ” the procedure.

By allowing the law to come into force while the lower courts continue to argue it, the Supreme Court has ushered in a new era of skepticism about abortion rights. The decision to refuse to urgently suspend the law was 5-4, with Barrett joining the majority.

Lynn Fitch Head
(Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch uses the gestational age law’s 15-week abortion ban to squarely target Roe v. Wade, attempting to end the nation’s ban on restrictions against pre-viability abortions Photo courtesy of Lynn Finch

In 2020, the United States Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana Act of 2014 that would have shut down virtually all abortion clinics in the state, affirming the basic logic under Roe. But the decision was 5-4, with Chief Justice John Roberts agreeing with Ginsburg and the other Liberals on the court. Now even Roberts’ assent would not be enough to stop the conservative wing of the post-Trump court from overturning half a century of precedence.

A federal court initially blocked the Law 2018 in the heart of the Dobbs case, the Gestational Age Act, which prohibits abortion after 15 weeks of gestation. While much of the bill’s wording addresses the development of the fetus in the womb into “human form,” the Mississippi state’s petition to the Supreme Court makes it clear that the goal is to demolish the central principle of Roe, which prevents restricting abortion before fetal viability, occurring around 23 weeks.

“Under the Constitution, can a state ban elective abortions before viability? The state of Mississippi asks in its brief. “Yes. Why? Because nothing in the constitutional text, structure, history or tradition supports an abortion right.… Roe and Casey (v. Planned Parenthood) are dead wrong. The conclusion that the abortion is a constitutional right has no basis in text, structure, history or tradition.

In Roe’s absence, Mississippi has trigger laws that will drastically restrict abortion beyond the 15-week ban in the Gestational Age Act. In 2019, Gov. Phil Bryant signed a fetal heart rate law to ban abortion after six weeks gestation, several months before fetal viability. Judge Carlton Reeves blocked this law, and the 5th U.S. Court of Appeals upheld its ruling, but Roe and Casey’s logic underlies those rulings.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control show that more over 92% of abortions “were performed at ≤13 weeks’ gestation,” meaning that the real impact of Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban could be a ban on abortions well into the future. beyond the reach of his language.

Without Roe, Mississippi’s precarious abortion access is likely doomed. “Some states, including California and New York, have laws protecting abortion rights,” Brewer wrote. “(But) Mississippi laws are designed to make abortion difficult to obtain and to make clinics like mine more difficult to operate. There are now five states with only one abortion clinic remaining. “


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Newsmakers: Local journalist named first Latina president of SPJ

ADVERTISING MARKETING

Kate lattimore norris was appointed vice president of Pavlik and associates, a full-service communications company. Norris has been with the firm for over 12 years, most recently serving as Director of Community Engagement.

In her new role, she was elevated to a leadership role in developing and executing successful communication strategies for the range of Pavlik’s public and private sector clients. She will continue to specialize in community engagement of all types.

She is currently pursuing a doctorate. in Public Administration and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Arlington. Norris holds an MBA in Marketing from the University of North Texas and a BA in Art History and Religious Studies from Texas Christian University.

ARCHITECTURE

VLK Architects promoted Dalane E. Bouillion, Ed.D., to the Director of Development in response to his outstanding accomplishments in supporting VLK’s commitment to link educational philosophy with focused design to better benefit current and future educational clients.

VLK Architects has offices throughout Texas and provides architectural, planning, and interior design services to clients in the automotive, K-12, college, corporate, and university industries. institutions.

She sits on the board of directors of Friends of Texas Public Schools. Other affiliations include the Texas Association of School Administrators, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, and the Association for Learning Environments. In 2011, she received the American Education Research Association’s Woman of the Year Studies Program Award.

In addition, on August 26, representatives of VLK Architects attended a grand opening ceremony commemorating the new Sherman High School. This new building measures 500,000 square feet, can accommodate 2,600 students in grades 9 to 12 and is part of the November 2017 requirement.

BANK AND FINANCE

Independent financier named Michael keith as Head of Mid-Market Banking Services for North Texas.

McKinney-based Independent Financial, ranked by Forbes as the nation’s sixth best publicly traded bank, operates as a financial services company with offices throughout Texas and the Colorado Front Range region.

The Lone Star agricultural credit newly elected board of directors Brent Neuhaus as president and Asa Langford as vice-chairman of the board of directors of the rural credit union. Neuhaus was first elected to the Board of Directors in 2017 and is originally from Waco. He is a director and corporate inventory manager at United Ag and Turf, which operates John Deere dealerships in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. He is also President and Director of TGBTG Property LLC and JORE LLC and breeds Angus cattle in McLennan County.

Jeff schmid joined the Foundation of the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking (SWGSB), headquartered at SMU Cox School of Business, as President and Chief Executive Officer effective September 1. Schmid’s move comes as current President and CEO S. Scott MacDonald, Ph.D., is retiring after 24 years of service.

With nearly 40 years of banking and regulatory experience, Schmid began his career at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in 1981 and remained there until 1989. He graduated from the SWGSB Summer Residency Program at SMU Cox in 1990.

After completing the SWGSB program, Schmid became President and CEO of two private banks in the Midwest. In 2007, he led the creation of Mutual of Omaha Bank, an investment wholly owned by Mutual of Omaha, of which he served as Chairman and CEO. He turned the organization into a national franchise with assets of nearly $ 10 billion.

BOARDS

BoardBuild announced the addition of five new members to the Board of Directors: Sandra Garcia Acevedo, Vianei Lopez Braun, Anthony Placencio, Brian Renteria and James Sackey. New board members join existing board members Jeffrey Allison, Kathryn Ball, Matthew Ciardiello, DJ Harrell, Elise Kensinger, Gregory Nielsen, Willie Rankin, Ed Riefenstahl and Beth watson.

BoardBuild also welcomes two staff members: John hernandez, director of strategy and Krista johnson, director of communication and training.

COMMUNICATION

Rebecca Aguilar became the first Latina national president of the Society of Professional Journalists in her 112-year history when she was sworn in by the SPJ National President Matthew T. Hall at the President’s Awards ceremony at the recent SPJ21 conference in Indianapolis.

Aguilar, who turns 40 as a journalist, is a Dallas-based freelance reporter. His journey began as a reporter at a television station in Toledo, Ohio. She also made professional stopovers at television stations in Chicago; Corpus Christi, Texas; San Antonio; Phoenix; Los Angeles and Dallas. Along the way, she received 50 awards and nominations for her work as a journalist.

Aguilar joined the SPJ in 2009 when the Digital Media Committee asked him to get involved. She has held senior positions in the digital and diversity committees.

Aguilar is the daughter of immigrants from Mexico. She grew up in Ohio and Mexico City. She received her BA in Communication from Bowling Green State University and earned her MA in Journalism from the University of North Texas.

EDUCATION

Barry lambert, Ph.D., has been appointed Acting Dean of Tarleton State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, pending approval from the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents, which is expected. He succeeds Steve damron, Ph.D., who retired on August 31.

Previously associate dean of the college and associate vice president for research, Lambert joined Tarleton faculty in 2003, becoming director of the Southwest Regional Dairy and dean of the College of Graduate Studies. He also headed the zootechnics and environmental and agricultural management departments.

HEALTH CARE

Lisa Albert was promoted to Assistant Vice President of Strategic Communications at Fort Worth Timely®, the leading provider of telehealth specializing in higher education. Albert joined TimelyMD in 2019 and leads the communications strategies that bring TimelyMD’s mission, vision and values ​​to life.

Former President of the Greater Fort Worth Chapter of PRSA, Albert previously held executive communications positions at Texas Christian University, Justin Brands, Inc. and the Texas Ballet Theater.

In a newly created role, Zac Fleming has broad responsibility for product management, product design and product strategy. Leveraging technology and strategy, he seeks to create innovative products so that students around the world can seamlessly access the care needed to thrive.

Fleming’s previous roles include Vice President of Product Management at Citi, General Manager of Digital Transformation at Baylor Scott & White Health and CTO at Three to Abandon. He also serves as an advisor to start-up founders, mentors global product leaders and volunteers to help move his local community forward.

NON-PROFIT

Courtney g lewis, Senior Vice President of BancorpSouth of the Fort Worth / Dallas area, is the new president of the Downtown Fort Worth Rotary Club for the year 2021-2022.

President Courtney was installed on July 1 and joins a long line of exceptional community leaders with the distinction of being the first woman of color to serve as president of the Rotary Club of Fort Worth. President Courtney brings a new perspective of leadership that inspires Rotarians to reflect on their service and role.

In addition to the Rotary Club, Lewis’s civic engagement includes Ronald McDonald House of Fort Worth as Past President and Housing Channel, Chairman of the Board, Camp Fire First Texas and Leadership Fort Worth.

PROMOTIONS

FASTSIGNS International Inc., a Carrollton-based signage and visual graphics franchisor with more than 750 FASTSIGNS locations in eight countries around the world, announced four internal promotions at the company that include Jeff Lewis, Barbara Engle, Grant Walker and Lana Daley.


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