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June 2022

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As China tightens its grip, Hong Kong’s luster as a ‘global city’ fades | Business and economy

Hong Kong, China – German entrepreneur Joseph loved his life in Hong Kong. When he wasn’t busy with his logistics business, he enjoyed walks along the waterfront promenade, weekend brunches in upscale Soho, and foot and back massages for relief. the daily stress of life.

But less than two years after setting up his business in Hong Kong, Joseph decided in January he saw no future in the city and moved to Singapore.

“Many potential investors are hesitant to invest in Hong Kong because they no longer believe it is a safe place to start a business,” Al. Jazeera told Al Jazeera.

“I can see the city has changed before my eyes. Hong Kong has been one of the most cosmopolitan cities, but protests and COVID restrictions mean that this advantage is fading…Investors don’t feel legally secure as they don’t know if there are still neutrality in Hong Kong’s legal system, while China’s legal system is full of gray areas. There is enough uncertainty in business, why do we want more?

As Hong Kong marks the 25th anniversary of its return to Chinese sovereignty on Friday, the city’s status as an international financial and trading center is in doubt like at no time since the handover.

Hong Kong celebrates 25 years since the city’s return to Chinese sovereignty [File: Joyce Zhou/Reuters]

Tens of thousands of residents have left the former British colony as Beijing’s tightening authoritarian control and tough pandemic restrictions aimed at aligning with China’s ‘zero-COVID’ strategy radically reshape life in the town.

More than 120,000 people, locals and expats, left in 2020 and 2021, with tens of thousands more expected to follow this year.

In a survey conducted by the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong last year, more than 40% of expats said they were planning to leave or considering doing so, mainly due to concerns about a draconian migration law. national security imposed by Beijing in 2020, strict COVID restrictions that limit international travel, and a bleak outlook for the city’s future competitiveness.

At the same time, fewer professionals are moving to the territory, with the number of work visa applications falling from 41,592 in 2018 to 14,617 in 2020, according to government data.

INTERACTIVE_HONGKONG_CHINA_GDP_JUNE30_2022

From humble beginnings as a fishing village, Hong Kong has blossomed into an international business center with a vibrant stock market often ranked alongside Singapore, London and New York.

After Hong Kong was ceded to Britain under the Treaty of Nanking that ended the First Opium War in 1842, the territory became a regional center for financial and commercial services.

During the 1970s and 1980s, the city shifted from manufacturing to financial services as factories, initially staffed by cheap workers from mainland China, sought cheaper labor from overseas.

Under the “Open Door” economic reforms launched by Chinese President Deng Xiaoping in 1978, the city’s integration with China deepened, spurring vigorous international trade and investment.

Five years later, the Hong Kong dollar was officially pegged to the US dollar, after uncertainty over the future of the then colony caused the currency to depreciate sharply.

The soldiers salute with the Chinese and British flags
Under the terms of Hong Kong’s return to China, Beijing has promised to preserve the city’s way of life for at least 50 years [File: Dylan Martinez/Reuters]

Under the terms of Hong Kong’s return to China in 1997, Beijing promised to preserve the city’s way of life, including civil liberties and political liberties not available in mainland China, for at least 50 years under the principle ” one country, two systems”. .

Those freedoms, however, quickly waned amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent that all but wiped out the city’s pro-democracy opposition and forced the closure of independent media outlets and dozens of civil society organizations.

Hong Kong’s new chief executive, John Lee, has pledged to boost Hong Kong’s reputation as a global financial hub, without offering a timetable for the city’s reopening to the world.

Lee, a former security chief who ran unopposed in an election tightly controlled by Beijing, hailed the national security law for restoring order and stability and described the implementation work of “one country, two systems” since the transfer as “a resounding success”.

But for international companies, the uncertainty created by the law, which has led to more than 200 arrests and instituted significant changes to the legal system inherited from the British, has become a major source of anxiety, according to Michael Davis, a former lawyer. professor at the University of Hong Kong.

“The vague national security law creates considerable uncertainty about acceptable behavior by international companies,” Davis told Al Jazeera.

“The pressure on the courts that accompanied the enforcement likely reduced trust in the rule of law, which has always been the city’s hallmark for attracting international business.”

Davis said international companies are also under pressure to support Beijing’s policies “while these companies are under pressure in the democracies where they operate not to support such repressive policies, at the risk of being shut out of the market.”

Medical staff monitor queues at the airport
Hong Kong’s strict quarantine rules have prompted an exodus of expats from the city [File: Bloomberg]

For Joseph, who ran the Asian operations of a logistics company before starting his own company, the attractiveness of Hong Kong is undeniable.

“Hong Kong had many advantages, such as easy cash inflows and outflows, and the legal system is close to the British common law system,” he said. “It was politically and judicially stable. At the time, my old company could choose [to set up the Asia headquarters] between Singapore and Hong Kong, and we chose Hong Kong because it was the gateway to China.

Hong Kong’s strict COVID restrictions, which once included a 21-day mandatory hotel quarantine for inbound travellers, have further damaged the city’s appeal.

Despite billing itself as the ‘global city of Asia’, the territory remains one of the few places outside China to quarantine arrivals, while its ‘circuit breaker’ policy of suspending flight routes linked to COVID cases routinely leaves travelers stranded abroad.

“This [policy] increases the cost for expats to visit family in foreign countries,” Vera Yuen, a lecturer in economics at the University of Hong Kong, told Al Jazeera.

“The quarantine requirement was later changed to seven days, but the circuit breaker policy was maintained. It was too late to keep these people in Hong Kong, especially compared to much of the rest of the world, where quarantine measures are no longer in place. As uncertainty reigns, another outbreak may again lead to stricter measures. They decided to move to a place that gives them more personal freedom.

Many local residents have also lost hope in the city.

Ip, a 30-year-old financial worker, said he planned to move to the UK in the near future due to the “increasingly undesirable environment”.

“I work in a British company, but many British and European colleagues have quit and gone back to their home countries,” Ip told Al Jazeera, asking to be identified only by her surname. “I think Hong Kong companies will lose their international character.

“Over the long term, the asset management industry may experience lower demand due to lower asset inflows. Coupled with a dubious [national] education here for my future children and the city’s lack of innovation over the past 25 years, I want to leave Hong Kong,” Ip added.

Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect logo on a screen with a man using a mobile phone in front
Hong Kong’s financial system is increasingly integrated with mainland China [File: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg]

Whatever the future of Hong Kong, there is no doubt that it will be more closely linked to China. Already, more than half of the companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX) are from the mainland.

Yuen, an economics professor, said China hopes to use Hong Kong to achieve economic goals, including the internationalization of the renminbi (Chinese currency) by “hosting RMB-denominated bonds and being an offshore trading hub in RMB”.

“Hong Kong’s stock market is increasingly dominated by mainland companies,” she said.

In 2014, the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect was launched to provide mutual access to stocks between the Hong Kong and mainland markets, followed by an expansion two years later to include Shenzhen, allowing mainland investors to access small businesses in Hong Kong.

In 2018, a change in weighted voting rights rules led to a surge of business listings in mainland China, including e-commerce giant Alibaba Group in November the following year. Last year, Wealth Management Connect was launched to provide access to investment products between Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Macau.

As Hong Kong’s freedoms and international character have suffered, the city’s growing alignment with China has been accompanied by growing wealth. Since 1997, the city’s economy has more than doubled, with gross domestic product (GDP) reaching $368 billion in 2021 – although GDP fell 4% in the first quarter year-on-year, restrictions related to the pandemic weighing on growth.

Davis, the law professor, predicted that Beijing would invest in Hong Kong to create a “dominant position” for mainland businesses and “undermine the traditional importance” of local and international companies.

For Joseph, the days when Hong Kong was the gateway for foreign companies to access China are over.

“If I want to start a company to do business in China, I would start one in Shanghai instead,” he said.

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Non profit living

Column: Artist, 95, sells his paintings to help pay the assisted living bill

It’s a sad situation when a 95-year-old woman is forced to turn to painting and selling her artwork to avoid being fired from an assisted living facility.

Patricia Barnett, who turns 96 in October, has accumulated a lifetime of civic service.

She’s delivered Meals on Wheels, supported a shelter for abused women, donated her talents as a graphic artist to nonprofit causes. Over the years, the Cornell University graduate has campaigned for social rights, clean water and other environmental issues.

Specifically, her resume shows a history of fighting for housing for the needy, both as the former president of a New York agency set up solely to fund affordable housing and as head of the League of Women. Voters from her state, through which she also campaigned for fair rents and social housing.

Now the 49-year-old San Diego resident finds herself in desperate need of those services she has spent years trying to obtain for others.

Barnett’s civil service legacy was carried on in San Diego by his son, Scott Barnett, a familiar face in the local community.

He was a member of the Del Mar City Council at 21, led the San Diego County Taxpayers Association when it created its Golden Fleece and Watchdog awards to expose government boondoggles and try to control spending.

He founded a research service called Taxpayers Advocate and served four years on the San Diego Unified School District Board.

Scott’s mother lived with him in his old age. But four falls in 2016, failing health and increasing frailty have made assisted living and ongoing care a necessity. Now she lacks money.

Barnett spent his life being frugal and conservative with his finances, running a small graphic design business, saving for retirement, and paying long-term health insurance premiums. But she couldn’t predict the stock market crash of 2008, nor did she plan to live to be 90.

In desperation, Scott, along with his brother, David, and sister, Catherine Anderson, set up a GoFundMe campaign in late April to help their mother with food, rent and basic bills. To date, he has generated just over $3,000.

Barnett explained in his GoFundMe appeal, “The economic crash of 2008 wiped out half of my savings and forced me to sell my house. Now the rest of my savings and my long-term care insurance policy are gone. exhausted.

Her long-term health insurance coverage ended in April, leaving her mostly dependent on her monthly Social Security check of about $2,300 to pay for some medical bills and a monthly assisted living bill from around $5,700.

“After a life of self-sufficiency, I ask for your help to stay on assisted living,” she wrote.

Barnett’s kids originally added information about her community service career to her GoFundMe bio, but she forced them to delete it: ‘She didn’t want us to brag about her,’ says Scott .

Its touching appeal surely represents the parenting story of many of today’s baby boomers and Gen-Xers. These are seniors who have worked and saved throughout their lives, but have been overwhelmed by cost-of-living inflation and the rising cost of goods as a result of the pandemic.

Social Security benefits have not kept pace, making it difficult to make ends meet in expensive states like California.

The lack of affordable assisted living facilities puts economic pressure on their children and grandchildren who are already burdened with their own financial obligations. Or as Scott puts it, “It’s a ticking time bomb for us baby boomers.” I just turned 60.”

Barnett, who took classes at the Toledo Museum of Fine Arts as a teenager, had put away her brushes after suffering a stroke in 2004. But she dusted them off in 2019 and, despite inoperable cataracts in one eye , now turns out a colorful paint every 8 to 10 days.

She has completed approximately 150 artworks since entering assisted living 3½ years ago.

Scott posted an album of “Grandma Pat” paintings on Facebook. Many are whimsical and bold landscapes bursting with colorful flowers and patterns.

Her family connected her to a website that sells her art for wall decor, t-shirts, mugs, beach towels and other items. But the returns to the artist are low.

David Barnett worked with his Brookdale Senior Living facility, which waived some late fees and offered a small rent reduction or placement in a slightly cheaper room or a more budget-friendly sister property. But the cost of rent always exceeds his income.

“If residents cannot meet their residency contract payment requirements, we try to help them find a workable solution,” said Heather Hunter, communications manager for Brookdale in Tennessee. She said help can include referrals to other providers and information about other types of assistance.

“A Medi-Cal funded facility (for low-income residents) is currently the only option for her,” says Scott, whose mother was approved for Medi-Cal. “We started calling as soon as it was clear that she would run out of money (in April). The number of beds available is far below what is needed, so there are long waiting lists.

Sunita Upchurch, the county’s long-term care ombudsman, says there are cheaper options that may not be on a family’s radar. In addition to four- or six-bed home care facilities, seniors may be placed in senior residences and senior apartments where they are visited by home care nurses and linked to meal delivery home. They may also be enrolled and transported to adult daycare programs.

“By 2030, Californians age 60 and older will make up a quarter of the population,” says Blanca Castro, long-term care ombudsman at the California Department of Aging. “Seniors who rely solely on Social Security for their income receive an average of $1,200 per month, which must be used to pay for all basic needs.”

The department helped draft a state master plan for aging 2030 with the primary goal of reducing rental costs and investing in affordable housing. But that’s years away.

Scott calls his family’s GoFundMe campaign a Hail Mary attempt to hopefully fill the void. Eventually, he says, his mother will have a roof over her head but surely not with the luxury of space to paint in her room.

“It’s been stressful,” says Barnett, who doesn’t sleep well. “I wake up and worry about where I’m going to live.”

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Canadian army

Former Stratford residence of local doctor, MP and senator honored with Blue Plaque Award

The former home in Stratford, at 198 Church Street, of two-term MP, Canadian Senator, physician, surgeon and First World War Lieutenant-Colonel, the Hon. Dr James Palmer Rankin received a Blue Plaque Award from Heritage Stratford and the town in a small ceremony on Tuesday afternoon.

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In a town like Stratford that has been home to many famous and colorful people, the personal stories of those who have dedicated their lives to their community can sometimes fade from public knowledge.

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On Tuesday, representatives from Heritage Stratford and Stratford Council, along with the current MP for Perth-Wellington, paid tribute to a man – the Hon. Dr James Palmer Rankin – who dedicated 53 years of his life to public and community service adorning the house where he lived from 1920 to 1934 at 198 Church St. with a Stratford Blue Plaque Award.

“Heritage Stratford ran a program last year called Tell Us Your Story, and we wanted the community to tell us stories about their loved ones or people they knew in the community,” said the Heritage President. Stratford, Cambria Ravenhill, during the ceremony on Tuesday. “We were looking for both the famous… or the less famous who deserved to be better known.

“The entry of (the owners of 198 Church St.) was truly remarkable to us because the man we are about to talk about has given over 50 years of public service to the town of Stratford and really hasn’t had a very high profile. In fact, many of us hadn’t even really heard of him.

Born near Tavistock in 1855, Rankin practiced as a physician and surgeon from his first home in Stratford on Erie Street. He was twice elected MP for North Perth, serving in the House of Commons from 1908 to 1911 and from 1921 to 1925, and was appointed to the Senate from 1925 to 1934 before dying at his home in Church Street at 79 years while still in office. .

During World War I, Rankin, then in his 50s, also served domestically as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

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Ravenhill said Rankin began his public life as president of a school board, then became a town councilor before winning his first election as MP in 1908. Rankin would go on to run and lose to Hugh Bolton Morphy in of the next two elections before regaining his seat in 1921, shortly before moving into the Church Street house.

“We talked about the election he won, but I think the most interesting thing was actually the election he lost in 1917,” Perth-Wellington MP John Nater said at the ceremony. of Tuesday. “It was at the height of the world war. As mentioned, he did not go overseas, but he was actively serving. He was in fact one of the few people to have served in the war effort and to stand for legislative elections. … I think it’s a testament to his personality and to him as a human being that he participated in both the war effort and an election effort.

Chairman of Heritage Stratford Cambria Ravenhill and the Hon.  Dr James Palmer Rankin's great-granddaughter Adrian Hey shows those gathered at a Blue Plaque awards ceremony on Tuesday the original sheepskin certificate Rankin received when he was named to the Senate of Canada in 1925. (Galen Simmons/The Beacon Herald)
Chairman of Heritage Stratford Cambria Ravenhill and the Hon. Dr James Palmer Rankin’s great-granddaughter Adrian Hey shows those gathered at a Blue Plaque awards ceremony on Tuesday the original sheepskin certificate Rankin received when he was named to the Senate of Canada in 1925. (Galen Simmons/The Beacon Herald)

Two of Rankin’s great-grandchildren, Adrian Hey and Gordon McTaggart, were present for the ceremony. Hey showed those gathered the original sheepskin certificate that Rankin had received after being appointed to the Senate. She said she remembered visiting her great-aunt, one of Rankin’s daughters, in the Church Street house as a child, before and after the transformation of the former home of Rankin into a three-unit boarding house.

“It was the last time I was here. It was probably when I was 10,” she said. “It’s quite nice to be back here. I know my great-grandfather would be so happy to have this recognition after all these years.

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Lucy Lawlor, who bought the house with her husband Richard Nesbitt after the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, thanked Peter Lunney, the man they bought the house from, for restoring it to its former glory as a than a single family home.

“We’ve always been interested in heritage… When we saw the article (about the Tell Us Your Story program) in the Beacon Herald, we contacted the archives. … My daughter Olivia (Nesbitt) had done her Masters in Archival and Library Science in England, so she was quite fascinated by history. So the first owner, in 1890, was a cobbler…and then we come to 1920, and it’s written by Dr. JP Rankin. He was probably the longest-serving owner, so he moved on to the Hon. James P. Rankin, so we started looking into him and the rest is history. It was beyond exceptional person,” Lawlor said.

Surprisingly, Rankin’s story might have remained in obscurity had it not been for Lawlor and his family’s interest in the heritage of their new home and Heritage Stratford’s Blue Plaque program, which celebrates the connections between notable figures of the past. and the buildings in which they lived or worked. .

“It’s still amazing after living here 51 years that there are stories like Dr. Rankin’s that have gone untold and that these people have not been recognized for their outstanding accomplishments,” said the Mayor of Stratford, Dan Mathieson. “Not only serving as a doctor and surgeon in our community, but being a member of our beloved Perth Regiment and serving in the First World War is testament to his dedication to public service.

“And to submit to two terms in the House of Commons, you really know he was attached to his country.”

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International headquarters

Focus on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management at the 7th Joint Convention Review Meeting

More than 750 delegates representing 76 Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management are at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna to share experiences and lessons learned from the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. This Seventh Joint Convention Review Meeting was originally scheduled for 2021, but was postponed from June 27 to July 8 this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over the next two weeks, the Contracting Parties will present and discuss their National Reports so that, through a constructive exchange of views, they can learn from each other about solutions to common and individual security issues related to the management of the spent fuel and radioactive waste, and contribute to achieving and maintaining a high level of safety worldwide.

Hans Wanner, Chair of the Seventh Review Meeting, Switzerland, welcomed the Contracting Parties, noting that the many nations and cultures that have come together provide a unique opportunity to exchange and learn from each other. . He recalled that the Contracting Parties were here now to fulfill the most important obligation of the Convention, namely to carry out an effective, rigorous and transparent peer review which will lead to the identification of measures to strengthen further nuclear safety on a global scale.

IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi stressed the relevance of the Convention not only for countries with a major nuclear power program, but for any country using radioactive sources. “More and more patients are receiving life-saving cancer treatment. More and more countries are using nuclear science and technology to support their sustainable development goals, and more and more countries are turning to nuclear energy to address the climate and energy crisis,” he said. he stated in his opening remarks. “The use of nuclear materials is increasing. We are here today to ensure that spent fuel and resulting radioactive waste is managed safely, in accordance with Joint Convention obligations and international safety standards,” he said.

“Good policies are not enough. They only work if they are implemented,” Grossi added. In this context, he also stressed the importance of resolutely cultivating public trust over the long term.

Since the last Review Meeting in 2018, 10 new Contracting Parties have joined the Joint Convention, bringing the total number to 88. high in the world. said M. Grossi. “Radioactive waste concerns all countries.

Mr. Grossi also briefed delegates on preliminary IAEA discussions to support Ukraine, as appropriate, including in the safe management of radioactive sources, in particular disused and orphan sources. “Our experts are available to provide immediate remote assistance, for example to support the verification of the inventory of radioactive sources or for the provision of technical expertise; and teams are also ready to travel to Ukraine to provide on-site assistance in areas such as source recovery and consolidation, and the safe and secure transport of radioactive sources to centralized storage facilities.

The Joint Convention, in force since 2001 under the auspices of the IAEA, is the only legally binding international instrument dealing with the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management on a global scale.

During the Review Meeting, the Contracting Parties will also participate in an open-ended working group to discuss procedural and other matters relating to the operation of the Convention, and will share their experiences and lessons learned during a thematic session on stakeholder engagement in management. radioactive waste from dismantling activities and former sites.

“A major objective of the review is, through robust and candid discussion, to identify good practices, areas of good performance, suggestions, challenges or other issues that may be an overriding common issue that should be highlighted as important for improving security,” said Nelli Aghajanyan, Joint Convention Coordinator.

Last year marked the 20e anniversary of the entry into force of the joint convention.

Further information, including summary reports of meetings as well as National Reports of Contracting Parties from previous review cycles, is available on the Joint Convention’s public website.

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Non profit living

Alamosa News | ASD teachers will receive an 8% increase for the 2022-2023 fiscal year

ALAMOSE – For the first time in about 20 years, teachers employed by the Alamosa School District (ASD) will receive a substantial raise — not the 1% to 2% cost-of-living adjustment, but an 8% raise at all levels which actually brings wages closer together. in line with the cost of living in Alamosa.

Support and paraprofessional staff will also receive the same increase.

The agreement included a new insurance benefits package that requires no co-payments for those who are insured.

What’s more, in a major victory to encourage retired teachers to return to the classroom, there was also an agreement allowing teachers to return to work even if they are retired – without it affecting their retirement and allowing them to return to the same level of compensation they received when they left.

The increase will now bring ASD salaries more in line — and more competitive — with other major districts outside of the San Luis Valley.

Beginning in the 2022-2023 school year, a first-grade teacher with a bachelor’s degree will earn an annual salary of $40,358, not including insurance paid for the employee as well as vacation and sick days. This represents an increase from a base salary of $37,274 for this fiscal year.

The deal was reached in late May following negotiations between six people representing the ASD administration – the superintendent, assistant superintendent, two managers, two board members and the business manager, who advised but did not did not negotiate.

Seven union members of the Alamosa Education Association (AEA) negotiated on behalf of teachers, including the two AEA co-chairs and five teachers.

But there were many more people in the room (literally and virtually) than the thirteen negotiators present. AEA wanted the negotiation process to be public and transparent, and thanks to ASD making it available on Zoom, more than 90 teachers attended the sessions, online or in person.

“We had four negotiation sessions,” explains Luis Murillo, Deputy Superintendent of ASD. “The fourth session lasted ten hours.”

In a meeting with ASD Superintendent Dr. Jones, Assistant Superintendent Luis Murillo and AEA Co-Chairs Kathy West and Myra Manzanares to discuss the deal, it was clear around the table that this was not a zero-sum negotiation with winners and losers. There was a general consensus that the end result was an agreement that everyone seemed happy with.

“We have teachers who work two or three jobs just to be successful,” Manzanares said. “And we did our homework. We came to the negotiations with a lot of information in hand and we made a very good presentation to the administration, including where the resources were in the district budget for the increase.

But it would appear that the increase was about more than just numbers on a ledger or money in a bank account, significant as that is clearly.

As Manzanares said, “With this deal, we feel valued and heard.”

After several decades without significant salary increases, capped by several very difficult and, at times, conflicting years, this was an important statement.

“This agreement is directly aligned with our strategic plan,” Murillo said, “and meets one of our strategic goals to improve recruitment and retention.”

From the administrators’ perspective, the negotiated agreement was a crucial part of a larger process that involved five listening sessions with teachers, parents, students and community members. The listening sessions were facilitated in conjunction with the Colorado Education Initiative, a nonprofit group that specializes in “accelerating the improvement of educational innovation in Colorado school districts.”

“We want school to be a happy place, a place where people enjoy working and learning,” Murillo said. The ASD/IEC listening sessions and discussions have led to concrete steps to start making this a reality.

“Teachers said they wanted more access to mental health services, so we implemented it,” Murillo said. “They also said they were happiest learning new things, new approaches, other than the PDFs that we sometimes have to hand out for training, as required by state law.”

This ‘something else’ has evolved into a professional development program that includes a long list of seminars, workshops and sometimes learning sessions with fellow teachers who are particularly skilled in areas where they can train other teachers.

“It’s all part of a bigger picture,” Murillo said. But a big part of that big picture starts with the difference that will be made in teachers’ lives with the implementation of a raise.

It is anything but a finished process and more like a first step. The deal has been in place for a year, when it will likely be renegotiated.

New decisions are also under discussion, including a transition to a four-day school week, advocated by more than 80% of parents and teachers.

But that decision will only come after significant work and thought, starting with the creation of a committee of individuals who will examine the proposal from all angles. “We don’t want to rush it,” Dr. Jones said. “We don’t want to be rushed and then look back and see where we made mistakes like other districts have. We want to consider all the implications and make sure we include them in our transition.

But it’s clearly a solid idea on the horizon because, just weeks after letting people know they were accepting applications to be on the committee, more than seventeen people showed interest.

“It’s only part of the future, Murillo said. “And it’s only just begun.

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History organization

FBI Washington Field Office Announces Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund as Recipient of 2021 FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award — FBI

WASHINGTON—Deputy Director-in-Charge Steven M. D’Antuono is pleased to announce that the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF) is the recipient of the 2021 FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award (DCLA) for Washington Field Office (WFO).

On Monday, June 27, 2022, SALDEF Executive Director Kiran Kaur Gill and Program Manager Sharan Singh accepted this year’s award on behalf of SALDEF.

SALDEF is an American non-profit Sikh educational, media, and political organization. The organization supports American Sikhs by strengthening dialogue, deepening understanding, promoting civic and political participation, and advocating for social justice and religious freedom. Throughout 2021, FBI WFO personnel and SALDEF representatives worked together to cultivate relationships between federal agents and American Sikhs.

“The FBI and SALDEF have different functions, but we share a common goal: to protect the lives and freedoms of the American people,” ADIC D’Antuono said. “SALDEF served as a bridge between FBI personnel and American Sikhs, helping us learn more about the people we serve and helping them learn more about the work we do to protect their community.”

From December 2020 to December 2021, SALDEF representatives participated in several FBI WFO Cultural Engagement Boards, which led to valuable feedback regarding interactions between law enforcement and American Sikhs. As a result, SALDEF held a presentation on Sikh American culture and history for dozens of FBI personnel and cited best practices for interacting with Sikh Americans.

“The better we know our communities, the better we can serve them,” said ADIC D’Antuono. “Cultural awareness training is crucial because it helps the FBI build trusting relationships with the public. People in our communities need to know that they can count on us to protect them.

SALDEF began bringing law enforcement and local communities together through its Law Enforcement Partnership Program in 1999. SALDEF representatives have partnered with organizations throughout the country and trained more than 100,000 federal and local officers in cultural awareness and community relations best practices.

SALDEF serves as a resource and voice for the Sikh American community on policy issues that affect not only Sikh Americans, but all Americans, including employment discrimination, racial profiling, school bullying, suffrage and women’s rights.

Since 1990, FBI offices have nominated a person or organization for an FBI DCLA in recognition of the nominee’s contributions to crime prevention in their communities.

More information about the FBI WFO Community Outreach Program is available at fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices/washingtondc/community-outreach.

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Canadian gun myths lead to bad government policy

Guns are among the Liberals’ three favorite issues, along with abortion and race. These concerns rally a progressive base against the conservatives; it usually works every time. But due to several gun myths, this strategy may fail here.

First, Canada the gun-related death rate is higher than many peer countries, at just over two per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Our figures are about six times lower than those of the United States, which is number one among the rich countries and has nearly 400 million weapons within its borders, i.e. 1.2 per person. We have nearly 13 million firearms, about one for every three Canadians.

Our firearm homicides have increased since 2013, according to Statistics Canada. However, it is the distribution of ownership and use that reveals much of the absurdity of Liberal gun policy. Firearm-related violent crime is highest in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the territories. Rural men are much more likely to die by suicide than the Canadian average.

Our problems are getting worse, but rifles are almost as dangerous as handguns. Rural and small town Canadians are much more likely to die from gun violence than residents of large cities. We are faced with the reality that most firearm deaths in Canada are the product of social realities like family violence, desperation and alcohol, not drug traffickers.

A second reality is that reducing access to firearms, particularly semi-automatic weapons, is likely to reduce gun deaths, but banning them will not work. What would help is a 200% incentive to hand them over, against proof of the purchase price. Long guns are available at hundreds of sporting goods stores. Why not end this trade or tax it to death? Handguns are widely available on the streets and their illegal importation is a more lucrative business than drugs. Banning them won’t stop that flow; the profits are too rich. (Years ago, “The Fifth Estate” demonstrated that a gun bought in the United States can be worth much more when smuggled into Canada.)

Why not make using a gun a riskier bet? Possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime can warrant a certain prison sentence, whether or not the weapon was used. Why not require handgun owners to report the use of their gun on an annual basis, with proof from a shooting club or shooting range? And the penalty for not having safely stored weapons confiscation and a heavy fine.

Stopping the flow of illegally imported weapons is much more difficult, but again there are probably several deterrents. One can be expelled and banned for life from re-entry for a variety of offenses – why not make illegal possession or transportation of firearms one of them? We uselessly X-ray the shoes and change of air travellers, at the cost of millions. Wouldn’t X-raying vehicles at major border crossings be a better use of that money?

However, the most effective way to reverse the rise in firearm deaths is through prevention.

Many years ago, progressive Canadian police leaders invented what are now called Community Safety Hubs, bringing together police officers, teachers, social workers and everyone else involved in supporting people and to families at risk. They share warning signals concerning their customers in the strictest confidentiality. They are looking for patterns and predictors of social breakdown – a death in the family, a child abandoning, reports of increased family violence, a sharp increase in alcohol and drug use.

This gives them a priority list of those who might urgently need additional support. The program was a huge success and is now copied around the world. By focusing on the risk of firearms in a family or neighborhood, the centers would undoubtedly reduce our death rate.

A policy of responsible gun ownership, increased investment in blocking illegal trade, and the use of social indices to help prevent gun deaths could be appealing to a clear majority of Canadians, including gun owners. But politics used as a political wedge to punish “bad” gun owners and reward “good” anti-gun activists will only divide us. Worse, it won’t work.

Robin V. Sears was an NDP strategist for 20 years and later served as a communications advisor to businesses and governments on three continents. He is a freelance columnist for the Star. Follow him on Twitter: @robinvsears

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International headquarters

Revised Plan for Optimist Site Apartments Opposed by City

Developer Lux Living hopes to build an apartment complex with seven or eight floors and two levels of underground parking.

ST. LOUIS — A plan to build an apartment complex on the site of a historic mid-century modern building in the Central West End is being opposed by city staff, even after the developer revised the plan to preserve the facade of the building.

In a report released Friday, staff from the city’s Office of Cultural Resources recommended that the St. Louis Preservation Board, which meets on Monday, reject a request from St. Louis-based apartment developer Lux Living to demolish part of the Optimist International building at 4494 Lindell Boul. Lux, led by CEO Vic Alston, hopes to build an apartment complex with seven or eight stories and two levels of underground parking.

The L-shaped building would be built around two walls of the Optimist facade, in a plan by the project’s new architect, HOK, redesigned from the Preservation Council voted in augustat the request of the curators, to reject Lux’s plan to demolish the entire building.

The Office of Cultural Resources wrote in its recommendation that the preservation board rejects the new design, saying it “considers this proposal a demolition, as it calls for the destruction of all but two pavilion walls. This project is an example of facadism, the architectural and constructive practice in which only the facade of a building is preserved and a new building erected behind or around it Facadism is not preservation.

The two existing buildings on the site are the headquarters of the global voluntary organization Optimist International, which hopes to downsize and spend less money maintaining older buildings for the space it typically uses. not.

The Optimist Lodge building was named as a landmark in a municipal survey that designated historic mid-century modern architecture. He called the pavilion one of the 25 most significant Mid-Century Modern buildings, out of 2,400 St. Louis structures assessed. The second Optimist building was not designated as a landmark and would be demolished as part of the new plan.

Read the rest of the story on the St. Louis Business Journal website.

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History organization

Trump court limited women’s rights using 19th century standards

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In Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organizationthe Supreme Court justices President Donald Trump has appointed to strike down Roe vs. Wade just delivered on Trump’s promise. The ruling limits women’s constitutional freedoms so dramatically that you can almost hear the chants of “lock her up!” from Trump supporters.

On the right, however, the decision is not seen as a step backwards. On the contrary, it is hailed as a constitutional restoration – a triumph of “originalism” over “living constitutionalism”. Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., who wrote the majority opinion, sees himself as restoring the constitution as law and cleansing it of politics.

But Dobbs is clearly a political project. Reverse roe deer has been the animating goal of the conservative legal movement since it mobilized under the banner of originalism under the Reagan administration. Far from setting aside politics in favor of a neutral interpretation of the law, Alito’s ruling reveals how conservative justices encode the movement’s goals and values ​​under the guise of highly selective historical claims.

Alito’s opinion – joined by Justices Clarence Thomas, Neil M. Gorsuch, Brett M. Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett – follows a kind of originalism in linking the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment to the distant past, even if it does not does not pretend to identify the meaning of the amendment to the voters who ratified it. (roe deer places the right to abortion in the Freedom Guarantee of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.) Instead, Alito follows a case called Washington v. Glucksberg (1997) and interprets the Fourteenth Amendment guarantee of liberty in light of the nation’s “history and traditions”; according to this view, only the rights deeply rooted in this history are protected. And the right to abortion is not, the majority said this week.

Justice Alito says tying the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment liberty guarantee to American “history and traditions” prevents judges from imposing their own views on the case at hand. “In interpreting what is meant by the Fourteenth Amendment’s reference to ‘freedom’,” he writes, “we must guard against the natural human tendency to confuse what this Amendment protects with our own ardent views on the freedom that Americans should enjoy.” Here he echoes the late Judge Antonin Scalia, who wrote, in “Originalism: The Lesser Evil”, that turning to history “establishes a historical criterion that is conceptually quite distinct from the preferences of the judge himself. “.

But Dobbs shows why both of these statements are false. A judge’s reliance on the historical record can mask judicial discretion as well as constrain it.

In Dobbs, the Trump court defines the Constitution’s protections for liberty by largely referring to laws enacted in mid-19th century America. During this period – conveniently enough – there was a campaign to ban abortion nationwide. (Alito includes an appendix listing many of these state laws.) But consider what was still part of the “history and traditions” of this period: the law did not protect a woman’s right to control the property, income or sex in marriage; it was a period when the Supreme Court said states could deny women the right to practice law and states could deny women the right to vote.

Why would the Supreme Court today tie the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment guarantee of liberty to laws enacted by men with such narrow view of women’s rights? The move is unprecedented. To date, the Supreme Court had not read the Constitution’s broad commitment to liberty in this time-limited way — for example, by enforcing contraceptive rights, the right to interracial marriage, and the right to homosexual marriage. The majority suggests that these other rights are not threatened by DobbsThomas’s logic — even if it adopts a method of interpreting freedom that discredits them (and even if Thomas calls for the relevant cases to be set aside in its agreement). Reading the guarantees of the Fourteenth Amendment in light of evolving conceptions of liberty has been so fundamental to modern constitutional jurisprudence that even the Glucksberg the case on which the court relied for its mandate to review history and traditions recognizes abortion as a protected freedom.

Traumatic pregnancies are terrible. Dobbs is going to make things worse.

Alito’s narrative of the nation’s history and traditions is shaped and whitewashed to substantiate the desired results. His version of the history of abortion laws, for example, profoundly dismisses the common law of the first republic, which criminalized abortion after it was expedited. He also provided an outrageously incomplete account of the mid-century campaign to ban abortion – writing, for example, that the opposition to abortion reflected in these laws was “heartfelt”. So he apologizes for wondering if politicians’ views on gender roles, at a time when women were disenfranchised, shaped the campaign to ban abortion, which they of course did. During the 19th century campaign against abortion, advocates of laws banning the practice argued that they were necessary to enforce women’s maternal and marital duties and to protect the ethno-religious character of the nation. Claims for the protection of unborn life were not self-contained as Alito claims, but deeply entangled with constitutionally suspect judgments, as documents from the time clearly show.

In all this talk of tradition, Alito begs a fundamental question: why should 19th-century anti-abortion laws limit how we understand the Constitution’s guarantee of freedom, nor the history and traditions of does segregation limit how we understand the Constitution’s equality guarantee? There is no good reason. The problem with rooting the meaning of our commitments in that past, as Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan succinctly put it in their dissent, is that “the men who ratified the Fourteenth Amendment and drafted the State laws of the time did not consider women as full and equal citizens. Do the judges who have joined the Dobbs majority? Apparently not.

They thought it was reasonable to allow states to coerce women based on laws enacted at a time when women were totally disenfranchised. And they signed an opinion in which a collection of decisions and laws written by white men was presented as representing the history and traditions of America, without a single female voice being represented; and who claimed that these traditions were sufficient to justify the deprivation of women today of half a century of constitutional rights. It is not an account of history “conceptually quite separate from the preferences of the judge himself”. It is the story that expresses the judicial preferences as the traditions of the nation

If anyone had bothered to look outside the statute books, they could have found plenty of evidence that 19th century Americans demanded autonomy in decisions about parenthood, just as they do today. These demands are expressed with passion in the abolitionist movements and for women’s suffrage. Women may not have had the right to vote, but they certainly had opinions about the importance of voluntary motherhood. If the Supreme Court wants to tie the meaning of freedom to the nation’s “history and traditions”, it must include the voices of the disenfranchised in such a narrative, unless it means perpetuating their powerlessness in under our current Constitution.

The judges who decided Dobbs scoff at “living constitutionalism”, but these originalists of course employ history and tradition for the purposes of living constitutionalism. The justices’ efforts to conceal their views on abortion in a story about the history and traditions of the Constitution reveal to us their view of women.

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International headquarters

CM Patnaik shares Odisha’s food security achievements at WFP headquarters in Rome

Odisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik spoke at the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) headquarters in Rome on Friday to share the state’s transformational progress in strengthening livelihoods and food security, with a particular focus on marginalized communities and women. The Prime Minister is currently in Rome at the invitation of WFP to visit its headquarters and share state transformation initiatives.

He delivered a speech in the presence of WFP’s Executive Director, David Beasley, and WFP’s senior management team. Patnaik also had interactions on the existing partnerships and programs on which the government of Odisha and the WFP in India are collaborating, to implement the common agenda of “Zero Hunger”.

“Over the past two decades, Odisha has gone through a transformational journey in food production, food security, livelihoods, disaster management, etc. By achieving food self-sufficiency, initiating large-scale development programs designed to create livelihoods and nutrition, and by focusing on partnerships, the state is steadily advancing towards the Sustainable Development Goals and inclusive development,” said Odisha CM. We would be happy to share our experience across the world through WFP and its partner agencies,” he added.

Meanwhile, the Executive Director of the World Food Program said he hailed the Odisha CM and said the state was translating into action with a series of ambitious projects to support inclusive development and new economic opportunities, especially for women. “It is a pleasure to welcome the Chief Minister of Odisha and to share our impressions of the innovative work the state is doing in partnership with WFP India. Our common goal of strengthening livelihoods and security across Odisha is translating into action with a series of ambitious projects to support inclusive development and new economic opportunities, especially for women. It is exciting to see how our collaboration is helping move Odisha forward towards achieving zero hunger and other United Nations Sustainable Development Goals,” the executive director of the World Food Program said.

“We recognize and appreciate the transformative work of the Odisha State Government in the areas of disaster management, food production and food security. Odisha’s success story can provide learning insights for other countries in the same situation. The Government of Odisha and WFP will collaborate to take this learning experience forward and provide a global training platform,” he added. The Chief Minister also expressed his appreciation for the partnership with the WFP on several fronts which has not only been effective in the state but has also been scaled up nationwide.

Valerie N Guarnieri, Deputy Executive Director, United Nations World Food Programme, Manoj Juneja, Deputy Executive Director, United Nations World Food Organization, Bishow Parajuli, Country Representative and Director, WFP India and Himanshu Bal , Head of State of Odisha, PAM India. Secretary of CM (5T) VK Pandian, Principal Secretary for Food and Civil Supplies VV Yadav and Resident Commissioner Ravikanth were present during the deliberations.

WFP and the Government of Odisha have signed four partnership agreements and launched six new projects in 2021. Some of the ongoing works include the transformation of the public distribution system and supply of paddy, the cereal distributor and the units smart mobile storage; using evidence on food and nutrition security for planning; follow-up to the program partnership with Odisha Millet Mission, safe fishing with fishing and animal resources development and partnership with the Mission Shakti program – a formidable network of seven million women grouped into six hundred thousand women self-help groups. (ANI)

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Canadian army

The Lee-Enfield repeating rifle has the second longest service history in the world

The first version of the Lee-Enfield repeating rifle entered service in 1895. Since then, 17 million units and a number of variants have been produced, and some are still in use today by Commonwealth police forces . The rifle made a name for itself during World War I and World War II and created a legacy that lives on to this day. Here is the history of its use.

Development of the Lee-Enfield repeating rifle and its early uses

An early example of the Lee-Enfield repeating rifle. (Photo credit: SSPL/Getty Images)

At the end of the 19th century, the United Kingdom regularly found itself in conflict. The British Army had a fine field rifle in the bolt-action Lee-Metford, but thought it could do better. This led to the development of the Lee-Enfield, named after lead designer James Paris Lee and the factory in which the weapon was developed, the Royal Small Arms Factory in Enfield, England.

The rifle featured a 10-round magazine, manually loaded with the British rimmed, high-powered .303 cartridge. Its biggest improvement was how quickly it could be fired. This was accomplished through a mechanism in its bolt-action design. Soldiers using the gun were even able to complete a “crazy minute”, during which they could fire between 20 and 30 rounds in 60 seconds. This made the Lee-Enfield the military fasted bolt-action rifle of the era.

First and Second World War

Troops lined up behind Lee-Enfield repeating rifles
Training troops on Lee-Enfield repeating rifles, before World War II. (Photo credit: ARTanner/Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Lee-Enfield repeating rifles played a prominent role in World War I and World War II. British troops carried them as their standard in both conflicts, and during World War I appreciated that the guns were shorter and easier to carry than a typical long rifle. Additionally, they could aim accurately from around 600 yards away, while still being able to hit someone over 1,400 yards away. However, there were problems, mainly with excessive recoil and an overheated barrel.

As soon as the First World War ended, the designers of the Lee-Enfield began working on improvements. During World War II, the rifle’s accuracy had improved remarkably and the stock was stronger. A spiked bayonet was also added.

Later use of the Lee-Enfield repeating rifle

British soldiers training on Lee-Enfield repeating rifles
British soldiers training on Lee-Enfield repeating rifles, 1938. (Photo Credit: Richards/Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Since there was no intention to retire the Lee-Enfield, improvements continued to be made over the years. After World War II, a lighter, shorter and more portable version of the rifle was created. The soldiers who wore it during the Malay emergency – also known as the Anti-British National Liberation War – decided it should be called the “Jungle Rifle”, although the name was never officially adopted.

The rifle was also used in the Korean War. This time it was mainly in the hands of the Australian Army, which modified the weapon into a weapon suitable for snipers. Similar modifications had also been made during the two world wars. Post-conflict Australian troops used the rifle in conflict in Malaysia, and it was used to train sniper candidates until the late 1970s.

Future use and durability

Afghan soldier holding a Lee-Enfield repeating rifle
An Afghan soldier showing off the Lee-Enfield repeating rifle he uses to defend his family. (Photo credit: MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Thanks to a number of factors, the Lee-Enfield had a much longer life than most rifles. In fact, it is the second oldest military bolt-action rifle in service, after the Mosin-Nagant. In addition to service in Canada, the rifle saw extensive use in India and surrounding areas.

Most notably, the Lee-Enfield is still in use by Pakistani and Bangladeshi police forces. While some units have chosen to retire the rifle, others find it still very useful.

The Lee-Enfield and the Canadian Armed Forces

Prince Charles looks at a Colt Canada C19 rifle
The Canadian Rangers present their new Cold Canada C19 rifles to Prince Charles. (Photo credit: PAUL CHIASSON/POOL/AFP/Getty Images)

While the Lee-Enfield had an incredibly long run in Europe, it was eventually retired by most forces. The rifle, however, had a lasting legacy with the Canadian Armed Forces.

More about us: Lahti L-39: The anti-tank weapon that the Finns nicknamed the “Elephant Gun”

It was particularly suited to the rugged and cold terrain of the Great White North and for this reason it was worn by the Canadian Rangers for a long time. The rifle’s wooden stock resists cracking or cracking. The rifle also has far fewer moving parts that could freeze in cold weather, and its power means it can not only stop enemies, but also out-of-control polar bears.

Although loved by the Canadian Armed Forces, they officially retired the Lee-Enfield in 2018 and replaced it with the specially developed Colt Canada C19.

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Non profit living

‘A new way of life’: how two refugees adapt to the state of Western Australia

As an ethnic Hazara woman, who continues to face discrimination in Afghanistan, Karini said she faces challenges at every turn. After growing up in poverty in Ghazni province, Karini, 26, was about to complete her degree in economics from Kabul University when the Taliban took over.

“I had dreams in Afghanistan,” says Karini (photo above). “But those dreams are shattered, and now I have to build a new dream here.”

After a journey of several months – through Germany, Washington, DC and New Mexico – Karini landed in Washington State, where she has lived for eight months. When she arrived she was wearing only four sets of clothes, two books and the scars on her legs where the razor wire surrounding Kabul airport had dug into her skin.

In May 2022, the United States granted Afghan refugees Temporary Protected Status for 18 months – the same designation given to Ukrainians in March. This elevated status prevents refugees from being sent back to their home countries amid an ongoing crisis. As of February 2022, more than 74,000 Afghan nationals have been admitted to the United States since Kabul fell to the Taliban.

In Washington state, lawmakers have earmarked more than $19 million in 2023 for contracts with nonprofits to provide relocation services. Between September and February, the Port of Seattle and its partners alone welcomed more than 3,000 refugees from Afghanistan.

Karini is just one of many refugees that these resettlement efforts have helped. Upon arriving in Tacoma, Karini was in contact with the Refugee Women’s Alliance, a nonprofit organization that helps immigrants in the Puget Sound area with employment, housing and mental health.

“Number 1 is housing,” says Mahnaz Eshetu, Executive Director of ReWA. “People want a roof over their heads. And to stay – to have stable housing – they need a job.

For small nonprofits, says Eshetu, it can be difficult to manage both fundraising and growth, but providing asylum seekers with housing and employment depends on an organization’s ability to to collect funds. These days, she says she works with a strong job market and there have been plenty of opportunities to connect refugees with employers.

Historically, Washington in general and Puget Sound in particular have accepted refugee populations, Eshetu says. The state ranked second nationally for the number of refugees admitted in 2020. Over the past 10 years, the state has also been the most popular destination for Ukrainian refugees, according to Bureau data. of Population, Refugees and Migration of the US Department of State. From October 2021 to May 2022, 263 Ukrainians have resettled in Washington – a number that is expected to increase if Ukrainians are granted humanitarian parole status and allowed to enter the country without visas.

In October, Governor Jay Inslee addressed newcomers from Afghanistan at Sea-Tac International Airport, saying he was “looking forward to seeing these new Washingtonians flourish.”

Currently, ReWA pays for Karini’s one-bedroom apartment in King County, but she works a packing job and funds her own English lessons. She says she hopes to be independent soon.

While housing and employment are keys to independence, Eshetu says initial care for asylum seekers must also consider their mental well-being. ReWA has several mental health counselors on staff to help refugees, and they strive to provide services in accessible languages.

“When people leave their country, it’s usually for fear of being executed or going to war — they’re traumatized,” Eshetu says of the refugees.

Karini says she didn’t leave her room for several days after arriving in Washington. Along with the frustrations of leaving her old life behind, she says she was deeply worried about her family, who still live in Afghanistan under the Taliban.

But she says it was her desire to help her family that convinced Karini to take a more active role in her life. Today, she provides money to her family back home and she hopes they will one day be able to join her in the United States.

“I said to myself, ‘If I sit alone in my house like this, what will happen to my family?’ “says Karini. “I can’t help them like that. That’s enough – I have to start and move on.

Today, Karini works with the Hazara Community of Washington, a non-profit organization working with Afghan refugees. She volunteers her time to help other women like her overcome personal mental health issues and sometimes domestic violence.

As for new immigrants from Afghanistan and Ukraine, Eshetu says resettlement agencies have been fortunate that many are highly educated. Eshetu says Afghan refugees, including Karini, worked with American troops and therefore adapted more quickly to life in the United States.

But this latest wave of refugees in the Puget Sound region is exceptional in that regard – many more refugees have to tackle the language barrier head-on.

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History organization

Loveland Historical Society Raises Money for Great Western Depots – Loveland Reporter-Herald

The Great Western Sugar Company occupies an important place in the history of northern Colorado, and more so in that of Loveland.

But two of the last visible remnants of that history – the Great Western Railway’s passenger and freight depots – are under threat from redevelopment.

Loveland Historical Society member Teri Johnson, left, greets Bill Smith as he purchases a memorial brick Thursday, June 23, 2022, outside the historic Milner-Schwarz House in Loveland. The Loveland Historical Society held a memorial brick sale event to raise funds to preserve the Great Western Railway Depot. Smith bought a brick in honor of his father, who worked for the Great Western Sugar Company. (Jenny Sparks/Loveland Reporter-Herald)

For much of the last decade, the Loveland Historical Society worked to save the white clapboard buildings near 10th Street and Monroe Avenue by moving them from the railroad to city property, but it is an expensive proposition.

The estimated costs for the assessment, hazmat abatement and relocation of the two structures is close to $100,000.

On Thursday, LHS kicked off a commemorative brick sale as part of its latest effort to raise the necessary funds.

“We want this history to be preserved because if it’s gone, it’s gone, you can’t get it back,” LHS President Teri Johnson said at the first public brick sale at the Milner-house. Schwarz. “We want to make sure he’s saved.”

The bricks are $50 each and will be listed with the buyer’s choice of wording. They will then be placed on the new site during the renovation of the depots.

Bill Smith of Loveland stopped by to buy a brick in honor of his late father, a longtime employee of Great Western Sugar who worked in many of the sugar towns that dotted the eastern plains of Colorado.

“It started in Fort Lupton, then we moved to Denver, then to Eaton, then back to Denver, then to Brush,” he said.

Ironically, the many moves never brought Smith’s family to Loveland, the site of Great Western’s first sugar mill, which opened in November 1901. In 1902, the conglomerate launched its own railway and opened the Loveland passenger depot.

At its peak, Great Western operated 25 sugar mills in six states.

“There are so many connections that everyone has with sugar in Loveland,” Johnson said.

“The sugar industry increased Loveland’s population by more than 300% in its first decade,” added LHS member Sharon Danhauer.

According to Johnson, the company is halfway to its fundraising goal of $86,000. Much of this comes from various fundraising campaigns, including the Rail Ale collaboration between Loveland brewers in 2021.

They also received a significant amount of private donations, including a large one from an organization of German-Russians in Windsor.

“So many Germans from Russia came here to work with sugar beets,” Danhauer explained. “And they were so thrifty that they quickly bought their own land and started growing sugar beets to sell to the factory.”

LHS also recently received a $15,000 matching grant from the Boettcher Foundation, in recognition of Great Western Sugar founder Charles Boettcher’s role in bringing sugar to Loveland. The company has until November to raise the funds.

LHS will hold additional brick sales at the City Farmers Market in Old Fairgrounds Park on June 26, August 28 and September 25. It will also be sold at the Cherry Pie Festival on July 16.

Bricks can also be purchased online at thatsmybrick.com/lovelandhist. For more information contact: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Canadian army

Ukrainian President Zelenskyy speaks with Canadian university students at an event at the University of Toronto

After a month at the University of Toronto, Kateryna Luchka wants to know what to expect upon returning to her hometown of Pryluky, Ukraine – an area she has described as “very dangerous” given the ongoing Russian invasion of her country.

So she put the question directly to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

The exchange took place at a Wednesday event — hosted and organized by the U of T president and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy — that brought together students from U of T and 11 other Canadian universities (see full list below) facing Ukrainian leader via a live video link.

Dressed in military fatigues and seated at a desk between two flags, Zelenskyy gave a short speech before taking part in a question-and-answer session with students from across the country.

He recalls attending a U of T-hosted international summit on Ukraine’s future in 2019, when he compared Ukraine’s underdog status to that of the Toronto Raptors, championship winners – a comparison that takes on a whole new meaning three years later.

“Today we are fighting for the future of our children and grandchildren – for the possibility of building the new country,” he said, speaking through an interpreter, at about Ukraine’s efforts to push one of the world’s largest armies from its borders.

“We will prevail against all odds for a free and democratic future.”

He added that Russia’s four-month-old invasion has caused hundreds of billions of dollars in damage, wiping out much of the progress Ukraine has made in improving infrastructure, attracting foreign investment and increasing trade. scanning.

Kateryna Luchka, who is part of an exchange initiative between the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Kyiv-Mohyla National Academy (KMA), poses a question to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy during the live event.

As for displaced students like Luchka — who is part of an exchange initiative between the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Kyiv-Mohyla National Academy (KMA) — Zelenskyy said security remains the government’s immediate priority.

“By defending our country and ensuring strong security aspects, we are laying the foundation for the country that will become different after full-blown aggression,” he said.

He also encouraged students who have studied abroad to come back and “build an independent Ukraine”.

Luchka, for her part, said she intended to return home.

“I hear people say it’s better to stay [in Canada] because we can be more useful to the Ukrainian people – but I want to go back to Ukraine,” she said.

“We are future generations. We will help rebuild our country.

U of T President Meric Gertler, who co-hosted President Volodymyr Zelenskyy of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, says Canadian universities, including the University of Toronto, are welcoming Ukrainian students whose studies have been interrupted by the war (photo by Nick Iwanyshyn)

President of U of T Meric Gertler said he was deeply honored that Zelenskyy took the time to speak with students at the University of Toronto and universities across the country.

“President Zelenskyyou and the people of Ukraine have won the admiration of people across Canada – and around the world – for your leadership and courage in this time of crisis,” he said.

Universities across the country have responded to your call to action. Many of them, including the University of Toronto, welcome Ukrainian students and faculty – and because we are inclined to build bridges rather than walls, we have also forged strong partnerships with top Ukrainian universities. plan.

With the support of a $3.2 million gift from the Temerty Foundation, the U of T is home to more than 200 Ukrainian students whose studies have been disrupted by war. The first batch of 20 Kyiv-Mohyla National Academy (KMA) students arrived last month on an exchange program with the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Arts and Science. A second cohort of students is expected to arrive in September. Three KMA professors are also at the U of T as visiting professors.

There is also an exchange program run by the Department of Computer Science in the Faculty of Arts and Science and the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence which has brought 29 students to the U of T, as well as a program from the U of T Mississauga which is home to 20 students.

In addition, Pierre Loewen, director of the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, announced at the event that up to 30 students from the Kyiv School of Economics (KSE) will arrive on campus this fall to study in the Master of Global Affairs from the Munk School. & Masters Programs in Public Policy. KSE students will have their tuition covered by the U of T and are eligible for financial support from Mitacs, a Canadian non-profit organization, for their living expenses.

Chrystia Freeland, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance of Canada, presented President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (photo by Nick Iwanyshyn)

Chrystia FreelandDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance of Canada, said Zelenskyy and the people of Ukraine are teaching the world a lesson in the importance of fighting for democracy.

“They teach us that you can stand up to someone bigger than yourself, even when the odds are stacked against you, if you believe in what you’re fighting for and if your cause is right and true,” said Freeland, who is the MP for University-Rosedale.

Canada has earmarked $1.87 billion in aid for Ukraine – of which $1.5 billion has been delivered – and would stand by Ukraine “for as long as it takes”, he said. -she adds.

University of Calgary student Faith Moghaddami asks President Volodymyr Zelenskyy a question during the live stream.

Anya Broytmana new Master of Arts student in European and Russian Affairs at the Munk School, asked Zelenskyy about his role models and noted that he had been compared in the media to figures ranging from Winston Churchill to Harry Potter.

“We know who Voldemort is in this war and we know who Harry Potter is – so we know how this war will end,” Zelenskyy joked.

He went on to point out that he was most inspired by “ordinary people” in Ukraine who resisted the Russian military, using tractors or even putting their bodies at risk to stall armored vehicles.

Broytman, who also recently completed her undergraduate studies at Trinity College at the University of Toronto, said after the event that she took the rare opportunity to ask Zelenskyy a more personal question to “get a glimpse of his inner world”.

“It’s so amazing to see someone in this dire situation, facing incredible pressure and incredible tragedy – that they can maintain their humanity and their sense of humor,” he said. she declared. “I think it’s really remarkable.”

Originally from Moscow, Broytman moved to Canada with his family as a teenager.

“I have friends in Russia who have democratic values ​​and who want to live in a free country, but right now they can’t even go out and demonstrate or face jail or fines,” he said. she declared.

“It was important to take advantage of the fact that I am in a free country and that I can speak on behalf of those people in Russia who oppose what is happening, who are also hostages and victims of war – and try to give them a voice.”

Emma Pattersonstudent in the second year of a master’s degree in European and Russian affairs at the Munk school, asked Zelenskyy how he balanced martial law with the preservation of democracy, and how the prospect of European Union membership influenced the Ukrainian government.

Zelenskyy responded by saying that declaring martial law for the first time in an independent Ukraine was necessary to carry out the war effort. “When the war continues, unfortunately there is no time for dialogue or discussions,” he replied. “There’s no time for that because you’re not [just] count seconds or minutes, but human lives – the number of survivors and the number of dead.

As for EU membership, he said the next few days would be decisive and hopes in Ukraine were high that it would be formally obtained candidate status.

Patterson says she was honored to represent the University of Toronto and speak to Zelenskyy, a leader she considers an inspiration.

“As someone who studies democracy, [I’m interested in] how they are able to maintain it in times of war when priorities change and everything changes,” she said.

Peter Loewen, director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at U of T, said up to 30 students from the Kyiv School of Economics (KSE) will arrive at U of T this fall to study at the Munk School (photo by Nick Iwanyshyn)

In response to another question from Faith Moghaddami, a student at the University of Calgary, Zelenskky said that Ukraine is not only fighting a war on the ground, but also an information battle. He likened the internet to a weapon that shows the world the losses Ukraine has suffered and the damage Russian forces have left in their wake.

“It’s a powerful instrument,” he said. “I don’t want our partners to be offended, because they transfer very powerful weapons to us – but I have to be honest, there is a big question: what matters most and what type of weapon protects us most ?

“Information – the word – can sometimes deliver a harder hit than certain types of weapons[s].”

As he has addressed legislatures around the world, Zelenskyy reiterated his call for support – arms, money and humanitarian aid – and he thanked Canada for helping Ukraine.

“Canada helps us as much as it can,” he said. “It is very important that you students from many other countries take this message to their respective countries to pressure their political leadership to give Ukraine what it needs.”

As for Luchka, she said she hopes to one day help bring about change in Ukraine’s education system, adding that she feels inspired by her time at U of T so far – and the opportunity to speak with Zelenskyy.

“I know the president wants the students back to rebuild our country because if not us, who else,” she said. “I think he gave me hope for the future that we have the power and we can make the changes. First, we have to end the war.

Read more about the event on Reuters

Watch a report on the event on CBC The National


Here is the full list of universities participating in the livestream (besides the U of T):

  • University of Alberta
  • University of Calgary
  • Dalhousie University
  • University of Manitoba
  • Montreal university
  • University of Prince Edward Island
  • Queen’s University
  • The University of Saskatchewan
  • University of Waterloo / Wilfrid Laurier University (joint event)
  • Western University

Although they did not participate in the live broadcast, U of T Scarborough also hosted a YouTube viewing party, as did the University of Guelph, McMaster University, Metropolitan University of Toronto and other universities across Canada.

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International headquarters

Spire Global Wins $6 Million Contract Extension with NASA for Earth Observation Data

VIENNA, Virginia–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Spire Global, Inc. (NYSE: SPIR) (“Spire” or “the Company”), a leading global provider of space data, analytics and services, today announced that it has been awarded a contract extension for $6 million over 12 months from NASA to continue its involvement with the agency Commercial Smallsat Data Acquisition Program (CSDA).

Spire will continue to provide a comprehensive catalog of Earth observation data, associated metadata and ancillary information from its constellation of more than 100 versatile satellites. The data provided will include:

  • Areal dataGNSS grazing angle reflectometry (GNSS-R) data from Speyer, to measure sea ice extent, classification and altimetry, soil moisture and wind speed at the surface of the ocean ;
  • Atmospheric dataSpeyer GNSS Radio Occultation Soundings (GNSS-RO), for weather forecasting models to improve the accuracy of global weather forecasts;
  • Space Weather providing electron density and scintillation measurements that allow researchers to monitor the ionosphere as well as prepare for and respond to weather events in space; and
  • Domain knowledge including satellite state vector, altitude and precise orbit determination (POD) data to correct errors in orbital drag models.

Spire data will be available for scientific purposes to all federal agencies, NASA-funded researchers, and US government-funded researchers.

“The CSDA program provides Earth observation data that is critical to the efforts of U.S. government agencies and researchers working to solve some of the biggest challenges we face, such as climate change,” said Chuck Cash, Vice President of Federal Sales, Speyer. “The program is a great example of how partnership between the private and public sectors can accelerate our path towards building a better and more sustainable future.”

NASA launched the CSDA program in 2017 with the goal of acquiring commercial datasets that support NASA’s Earth science research and application goals. Commercial datasets provide a cost-effective way to augment the suite of Earth observations acquired by NASA, other U.S. government agencies, and international partners and agencies.

“NASA is continuing its relationship with Spire Global through the CSDA program for another year. This data continues to be leveraged by NASA and its funded researchers, as well as other U.S. government partners,” said Will McCarty, CSDA program scientist at NASA Headquarters. “We are exploiting these observations to better understand the physical processes associated with our Earth’s atmosphere and surface, as well as to observe and understand solar space weather at the boundary between Earth’s atmosphere and space.”

Spire will provide continuous access to 12 months of radio occultation data with a latency of 30 days. These data will be archived and maintained by NASA in the Smallsat Data Explorer (SDX) database of the CSDA program. Federal agencies and US government-funded researchers can request access to data through the CSDA Program Trade Datasets Webpage.

About Spire Global, Inc.

Spire (NYSE: SPIR) is a leading global provider of space data, analytics and space services, providing access to unique datasets and powerful information about Earth from the ultimate vantage point to that organizations can make decisions with confidence, accuracy and speed. . Spire uses one of the largest constellations of general-purpose satellites in the world to obtain valuable data that is difficult to acquire and enriches it with predictive solutions. Spire then provides this data as a subscription to organizations around the world so they can improve business operations, reduce their environmental footprint, deploy resources for growth and competitive advantage, and mitigate risk. Spire gives commercial and government organizations the competitive edge as they seek to innovate and solve some of the world’s toughest problems with space-based insights. Spire has offices in San Francisco, Boulder, Washington DC, Ontario, Glasgow, Oxfordshire, Luxembourg and Singapore. To learn more, visit www.spire.com.

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History organization

Fifty years ago, these feminist networks made Title IX possible.

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With June 23, 2022, marking the 50th anniversary of Title IX, the landmark legislation banning gender discrimination in education, there has been continued publicity about the law’s impact over the past five decades. There has been far less coverage of the origins of Title IX, and that story tends to focus mostly on Congress.

But the congressional action is only half of the origin story of Title IX. The other, equally important half concerns activism that began a decade before 1972 and was continued by a large open feminist network across the United States. These activists – working alongside federal government administrators, civil servants, members of Congress and their employees – have made Title IX a reality.

Title IX’s history in Congress revolves around Rep. Edith Green (D-Ore.) — the chair of the Subcommittee on Higher Education — leading a successful legislative effort in the House, while Sen. Birch Bayh ( D-Ind.) pushed the bill through the upper house.

In 1970, Green introduced an omnibus education bill that included a provision prohibiting sex discrimination. She then held the first-ever congressional hearings on sex discrimination in education, but the bill never passed in committee. In 1971, Green again introduced an omnibus education bill that included a provision prohibiting sex discrimination. This time, with great effort, she managed to get her provision accepted by the Grand Committee, followed by the approval of the whole House.

On the Senate side, Bayh struggled to introduce a gender discrimination amendment to an education bill. He was not on the subcommittee on education, and that committee’s chairman, Claiborne Pell (DR.I.), did not want potentially conflicting issues to disrupt the federal undergraduate student loan program that he was trying to push through – what would become the Pell Grants. After repeated trials, Bayh finally garnered the votes needed to present his amendment to the Senate, where it passed. The House and Senate bills were then sent to a conference committee, resulting in an omnibus compromise bill after long and contentious sessions on the burning provisions for school transportation and school funding. Higher Education. The bill passed with the Title IX provision largely ignored.

But this narrative ignores how, beginning in the 1960s and continuing into the 1970s, three key leaders outside of Congress provided the lobbying energy and crucial documentation needed to make Title IX a reality.

The first leader to emerge was Esther Peterson, who served as Undersecretary of Labor in the administrations of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Peterson guided Kennedy’s Presidential Commission on the Status of Women to advocate for what became the Equal Pay Act of 1963 – and she did so by bringing together like-minded administrators and staff the same ideas, members of Congress, unions and women’s groups. The Equal Pay Act was the first federal law prohibiting discrimination in employment based on sex. But it was relatively low, excluding women working in educational institutions, where most women worked outside the home.

Yet the fact that Congress passed something to address equal pay for women encouraged Peterson and his network of activists to do more. They then pressured Johnson to sign Executive Order 11375 in 1967, an amendment that added “sex” to the protected categories of race, creed, color and national origin in an earlier executive order that prohibited discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors. Significantly, the amended EO 11246-11375 placed gender on an equal footing with race. And it covered educational institutions, allowing women to file hundreds of sex discrimination complaints.

Peterson, with her ties to federal administrators and staffers, members of Congress, and many feminists, had become a central leader of employment equality initiatives. In other words, she and her network of defenders helped lay the groundwork for Title IX.

Catherine East, a federal government employee, did the same. Over the course of nearly 40 years, East worked her way to a strategic position in the Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor, where she had access to crucial statistics and other information needed to make advancing legislation for women. East worked without fanfare, photocopying statistics, legal briefs and related information to send to lawyers, women’s groups and other interested parties. Recipients copied the information and sent it to others, who often did the same. East, who was active in women’s organizations, also worked to expand her feminist network by connecting women activists.

Bernice Sandler, the third central figure in this growing network, was a highly trained aspiring professor who became a lawyer after losing college jobs because of her gender. She joined the Women’s Equity Action League (WEAL) which was formed in 1968 to focus on equal opportunity for women in employment and education. When Sandler learned of EO 11246-11375, the executive order Peterson had requested the previous year, she immediately thought of its application to colleges and universities, most of which received federal contracts. She met with Vincent Macaluso of the Labor Department, who gave her valuable advice on the complaint process. He also arranged for her to meet East, who he informed Sandler had a wealth of information.

Sandler turned to East for crucial documents that allowed her to file sex discrimination charges against 250 colleges. She also backed up her complaint with data from the extensive network of contacts she had established with female students across the country. East then helped Sandler distribute the complaint and evidence to members of Congress at a crucial time — as Green, as chair of the higher education subcommittee, sought hard data to help her introduce a legislation and to hold hearings on gender discrimination in education. . Green hired Sandler, who prepared for the hearings by contacting potential witnesses; subsequently, she compiled testimonies and related documents into two 1,261-page volumes.

Meanwhile, Sandler and his network of activists provided Bayh with the data he needed to get votes on his amendment to the Senate Education Bill.

With the 50th anniversary of Title IX, it’s time to recognize the significance of Peterson, East and Sandler, who – with overlapping networks of feminist activists and extensive documentation of gender discrimination – provided exactly what Green and Bayh needed to pass Title IX. Congress.

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Canadian army

Mountie says shooter looked ‘furious’ when arrested months before Nova Scotia shooting

It was one of the few interactions after more than a thousand traffic stops that stood out.

An RCMP officer testified on Monday that in February 2020 he vowed to Gabriel Wortman to get back in his vehicle after he pulled him over for speeding and the 51-year-old immediately presented himself as a “threat claire” on the way back to the cruiser at Portapique, N.S.

“The way he approached was very direct, determined. He looked furious, I had no idea who this individual was and why he was behaving this way,” Const. Nick Dorrington told a public inquiry into the shooting and arson that left 22 people injured and dead, including a pregnant woman and an RCMP officer.

The exchange “quickly died down”, however, once Wortman was back in his vehicle and they had a brief conversation, Dorrington testified.

‘He started telling me he felt targeted’ and complied after Dorrington explained that the stoppage was in no way prompted by an earlier altercation Wortman had with regional police. Halifax over a parking dispute, the officer said.

The shooter then spoke of his fondness for Ford Taurus cars, that he had a number of them and that he collected police paraphernalia, but Dorrington said the minute-long conversation did not prompt him to worry about public safety.

Dorrington, who spent 17 years in the military before joining the RCMP in 2015, was stationed in Colchester County and was one of the officers who responded to the mass shooting on the night of April 18-19 april. This weekend, he was on call after working a day shift.

During Monday’s testimony, he criticized the role of one of his RCMP supervisors in the response and said he disagreed with the decision to send only one team in. the section of Portapique where people were killed. He also felt he should have been deployed to hunt the shooter the following morning.

const. Nick Dorrington said he took a picture of the shooter’s driver’s license and his speed camera as evidence in case the driver contests a ticket in court. (Illustration photo by Radio-Canada)

After learning he had arrested the suspect a few months prior, Dorrington shared photos he took of the shooter’s license and the back of the disused Ford Taurus he was driving.

He said the vehicle he stopped had faded reflective strips from when it was an RCMP car and there was a small Canadian flag on the back near the trunk.

But, in the same way as several other constables have previously told the Mass Casualty Commission, while contemplating what the suspect was driving, he never imagined a fully marked cruiser like the one the shooter assembled and drove during the rampage.

Frustrated with positioning

Between midnight and 5 a.m., Dorrington and another officer were parked at the Highway 2 enforcement vehicles four miles east of the crime scenes in Portapique.

Dorrington testified that he “had a challenge” with Sgt. Andy O’Brien’s management of moving there as he felt it was “at odds” with his training related to hunting down active shooters.

The public inquiry previously heard that senior officers overseeing the response were concerned about the possibility of sending more than one team to the “hot zone” where the shooter was last seen due to the possible risk to the safety of officers involved in a crossfire or a “blue on blue situation” where they became confused with the suspect.

Commanders did not have GPS coordinates for general duty constables in the field.

But Dorrington said that night he felt the approach should have been to use “as many teams as necessary to locate and neutralize the threat” and agreed with the lawyer’s suggestion. Roger Burrill’s commission that it caused him frustration.

Problems with the role of the supervisor

In a behind-the-scenes interview with commission staff, Dorrington criticized O’Brien’s involvement, given that he was off duty and speaking on the radio from home.

On Monday, he said that while he has since backed down from criticism related to O’Brien’s training, he maintained his involvement made it unclear who was in charge.

“Receiving instructions from Sgt. O’Brien, although I mean well, was creating…extra airtime on the radio, which is problematic. And it created, in my mind, confusion for the channel of command,” Dorrington said.

O’Brien and Dorrington worked closely together Sunday at Portapique. Both stayed in the community keeping tabs on crime scenes.

Once calls started coming in about further shootings in the Wentworth area, Dorrington said he was ‘not allowed’ to leave to help with the manhunt, despite having pleaded his case to O’Brien.

“I felt that given my skills with prior military training in active theater [along] with the RCMP training, coupled with the fact that I had an unmarked vehicle, that I might be in the best position to leave my current location,” he said.

At one point, Commissioner Leanne Fitch asked Dorrington if he had ever taken or taught courses in overseeing a critical incident response. He said he didn’t.

Dorrington said he was a sergeant in the army, so had similar duties to O’Brien and was in charge of a unit in that capacity.

Pass Along Sunday Morning Gunner’s Observation

While in Portapique on April 19, Dorrington advised his wife to take shelter in their basement. He said information gleaned from the shooter’s wife, Lisa Banfield, suggested he had a blacklist and he feared he could be considered a target given he was the last constable in interact with the shooter.

Officers who questioned Banfield in the back of an ambulance previously testified at the inquest and said that although she told them her sister in Dartmouth might be in danger, they did not describe a list black.

Twenty-two people died on April 18 and 19, 2020. Top row from left: Gina Goulet, Dawn Gulenchyn, Jolene Oliver, Frank Gulenchyn, Sean McLeod, Alanna Jenkins. Second row: John Zahl, Lisa McCully, Joey Webber, Heidi Stevenson, Heather O’Brien and Jamie Blair. Third row from top: Kristen Beaton, Lillian Campbell, Joanne Thomas, Peter Bond, Tom Bagley and Greg Blair. Bottom row: Emily Tuck, Joy Bond, Corrie Ellison and Aaron Tuck. (Radio Canada)

Upon learning of the situation, Dorrington’s wife called a friend who noticed a marked RCMP cruiser driving south towards the Halifax area on a side road. Dorrington tried to determine if an actual cruiser was in the area, then radioed his colleagues after the possible sighting.

There was a lot of radio chatter at the time and Dorrington testified that he felt there was “significant delay” in the distribution of his message, which he considered “relevant and high priority”.

Felt gear was insufficient

Equipment and training was another area Dorrington took issue with.

He said that since the RCMP primarily polices rural Canada, more active shooter training should be conducted outdoors and focused more on nighttime scenarios.

Night-vision goggles or hand-held devices to identify heat sources would also be helpful, he said, so general duty officers don’t have to wait for specialized resources like the emergency response team. urgency during a crisis.

Lawyer Sandra McCulloch, who represents many family members of those killed, asked Dorrington about comments he had previously made to the inquest about officers’ safety-related requests being denied by a detachment commander before April 2020.

Those requests included a chair to restrain people who might pose a physical risk to themselves or others at the detachment, Dorrington said.

He also asked for rotating spotlights for vehicles, which he said would help illuminate long driveways and driveways better than the fixed lights on cruiser light bars that only move when a vehicle does.

A request for push bars on patrol vehicles – which he said would be cheaper than repairing vehicle damage – was denied about a week before two of the detachment’s cruisers were written off after one was been supported by another, he said.

MORE STORIES

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International headquarters

Will it be Maryland or Virginia? The feds are close to a verdict on the new FBI headquarters

WASHINGTON — Politicians from Maryland and Virginia vying for the award for a new FBI headquarters have just months before a crucial decision by the federal government.

The U.S. General Services Administration is expected to choose the best of three locations as early as September, ending nearly two decades of advocacy, confusion and frustration between four presidencies over whether the FBI should move to the suburbs bordering the District of Columbia or stay downtown.

GSA staffers told Congress last week in closed briefings that the three possible locations selected as options under the Obama administration — Greenbelt, Maryland; Landover, Maryland; and Springfield, Virginia – are still viable locations for future FBI headquarters.

“For too long, FBI personnel have been housed in a building that does not meet their security or operational needs,” U.S. Sens. Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen and Representatives Anthony Brown and Steny H. Hoyer told the result of the decision. .

“That’s why we will continue to push for the new headquarters, and we are confident that the Maryland sites in Greenbelt and Landover are the best locations,” the Maryland Democrats continued.

The Northern Virginia delegation, consisting of Sens Tim Kaine and Mark Warner as well as Representatives Don Beyer, Gerry Connolly and Jennifer Wexton, said in a statement that they were “pleased” the General Services Administration determined that Springfield remained an option.

“This is an important step in the site selection process, and we look forward to continuing to work with the administration to bring an FBI headquarters that best supports the FBI mission to Northern Virginia.” , said Democrats.

A move to the suburbs

The new location will be the first time the FBI has moved from its Pennsylvania Avenue headquarters to downtown Washington, DC, since the building opened in 1974.

The process of relocating thousands of FBI agents and officials began in 2005 when the agency’s asset management plan identified the need for a new headquarters, given the deteriorating state of the FBI. of the 2.4 million square foot headquarters and its cramped quarters.

The building is bounded by four major city streets — 9th, 10th and E Streets and Pennsylvania Avenue — all of which are open to public traffic, the report said. The building is a seven-story concrete structure on the Pennsylvania Avenue side and 11 stories on the E Street side.

In 2011, the Government Accountability Office, under the orders of Congress, wrote a report concluding that “the FBI has outgrown its headquarters, the J. Edgar Hoover Building”.

“Head office staff who cannot be housed in the Hoover Building are dispersed across more than 40 leased annexes (annexes), the majority of which are located in the National Capital Region,” the report said. “FBI officials report that the dispersal of personnel, combined with deficiencies in the condition of the building and the Hoover site, is affecting security and creating operational inefficiencies.”

At the time, the GAO said there were three paths to take: retrofit the existing building, rebuild in the same location, or move to a new headquarters in a different location.

The federal government decided to move the FBI to the suburbs, and in 2014 the GSA selected all three locations as possible sites.

Move canceled

The project continued to move forward until July 2017, President Donald Trump’s first year in office, when the GSA released a statement saying it was cancellation of the project.

The agency cited the funding, but noted that “cancellation of the project does not diminish the need for a new FBI headquarters.”

The action sparked concern and condemnation from Democratsparticularly after reports that Trump did not want a hotel company to buy the current FBI site and compete with his neighboring Trump International Hotel, which has since been sold.

The following February, the GSA submitted a plan that would have built a new FBI headquarters on the existing site while sending personnel to other locations around the country.

Trump administration officials at the GSA claimed it would cost less than building a suburban headquarters, but an inspector general report said that was not the case.

“We found that the GSA had not included all costs in its analysis and that JEH’s demolition and reconstruction plan would actually be more expensive,” he said.

The report said it was unclear how the plan to rebuild downtown Washington, DC, would meet safety goals.

The Inspector General also chastised then-Administrator Emily Murphy for her testimony to Congress that “was incomplete and perhaps left the misleading impression that she had no discussion with officials at the White House in the decision-making process regarding the project”.

A new search

The GSA dusted off its search process this spring after Congress added a provision to the government’s annual funding package requiring GSA Administrator Robin Carnahan to make a final decision on a location in a “prompt manner.”

Although the law does not include a specific timeline, a Democratic Senate aide said lawmakers are urging the administration to choose a site by September.

The Biden administration also backs the plan, saying in its fiscal year 2023 budget request that the “J. Edgar Hoover Building can no longer support the FBI’s long-term mission.

The White House instructed the FBI and GSA to use the next year to establish the exact number of employees to work at the suburban headquarters as well as an updated list of requirements for the project.

“In addition, the FBI and GSA will work to identify a federally owned location in the District of Columbia to support a presence of approximately 750 to 1,000 FBI personnel that would support the FBI’s day-to-day engagement with the DOJ headquarters, the White House, and Congress,” the budget states.

The updated plan should allow the Biden administration to send Congress a formal budget request for the new FBI headquarters project next year.

Prior to that, U.S. House lawmakers are to propose $500 million is going to the new suburban headquarters, which is expected to cost billions.

Maryland Democratic Representatives Brown, Hoyer, Kweisi Mfume, Jamie B. Raskin, Dutch Ruppersberger, John Sarbanes and David Trone celebrated the House by including the money in the bill.

“This funding will ensure that the Biden administration has the resources it needs once it selects a site to move forward with construction of the new headquarters this fall,” they wrote in a statement.

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Non profit living

Watch Live – NBC Boston

King Boston, the non-profit racial equity organization working closely with the City of Boston
and the Boston Foundation to create an inclusive and equitable Boston for all, will commemorate June 19 on Monday, June 20 with “One Night in Boston,” a half-hour special, which airs on NBC10 Boston and NECN at 7:30 p.m.

“One Night in Boston” focuses on the importance of black arts and culture in Boston and is a celebration of Juneteenth. The program will feature nine of Boston’s talented young black and brown artists, including King Boston artist-in-residence Kaovanny, R&B singer Divine, and students from Boston’s only public arts high school, the Boston Arts Academy. . Beyond Measure Productions, a black man and women
owned film company, is working with King Boston to produce the special program.

“Our latest film is part of our overall commitment to elevating the best and brightest artists in our city and regions,” said Greg Ball, director of digital strategy and promotion at King Boston. “Art allows us to see ourselves and be seen by each other. Our sincerest hope is to be able to change the narratives surrounding our city’s culture by showcasing the work of these stellar artists.

“One Night in Boston” also marks the end of a historic week for King Boston. From June 13-17, the nonprofit organized The Embrace Ideas Festival, a unique five-day celebration of Juneteenth.

Through panels and discussions, the festival highlighted the work needed to propel anti-racism and usher in a vision for a new, more equitable Boston. The Embrace Ideas Festival wrapped up Friday night with a Block Party in Nubian Square, another celebration of black arts and culture for the city.

“Celebrating the work of black artists in the city is a priority at our stations,” said Maggie Baxter, vice president of programming for NBC10 Boston, NECN and Telemundo Boston. “We proudly stand with our partner King Boston in honoring, recognizing, celebrating and elevating the June 19 message of resilience to our bilingual and multiracial communities. »

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History organization

Nuns created some of Australia’s first schools, but their history remains shrouded

In a wealthy country like Australia, an era without public schools seems unimaginable. But in the 1840s, when the Sisters of Mercy opened the first secondary school in Western Australia, there were only a few small private schools. Many children, especially girls, receive no formal education.

Nuns, or nuns, made education more accessible. Their way of life also provided one of the few leadership opportunities for women.

These women have demonstrated entrepreneurial and diplomatic skills while developing education in Australia. Their work required them to navigate hostile male hierarchies, religious discrimination, class struggles and complex relationships with Indigenous peoples.

Historians have documented some of this history, but there is a long way to go. In a country committed to egalitarianism, the lives of nuns testify to the larger historical reality of inequality.

Where did these women come from?

Religious orders are made up of people living apart from society but as a community under the spiritual rule of their founder. Catherine McAuley (1778-1841) founded the Sisters of Mercy in Dublin when she opened the first House of Mercy dedicated to serving the poor, sick and uneducated.

Catherine’s approach to helping the burgeoning poor in Ireland was radical. The community consisted of two classes of sisters. The choir sisters were educated, middle-class women and usually served as teachers. The lay sisters were poor and working class and managed the kitchen or the laundry.

Ursula Frayne (1816-1885), who opened the first secondary school in Western Australia as well as schools in Victoria in the mid-19th century, had trained with McAuley. In 1845, Bishop John Brady visited the Sisters’ Convent in Dublin and asked the Mother Superior to send six Sisters to Western Australia with Frayne as head.

While sailing to Western Australia aboard the Elizabeth, one member of the missionary party traveling with Bishop Brady was a young French monk, Léandre Fonteinne, who noted ominously:

“His Lordship is only concerned […] for the six nuns he brings with us. They are and will remain for many years a burden on the mission.

What did they do in Australia?

After arriving in Perth, in 1846, the sisters became the first female religious teaching order to establish a school in Australia. After navigating sectarianism in Ireland, they decided to offer a general education to all Christians. The sisters prioritized Aboriginals, Irish immigrant orphans, the poor, and the uneducated. The sisters established a fee-paying school, a voluntary institution and Western Australia’s first high school.

Coming from a prosperous Dublin family, Frayne was conscious of his class, but the distinction between choir and lay nuns was not viable in colonial Perth. Leaning on the bishop was not an option that would allow them to advance their business.

For these women to be self-sufficient, each had to perform domestic chores. Frayne herself became a baker.

Although Bishop Brady promised financial support, in 1850 Frayne traveled to Colombo, Malta, Rome, Florence, Paris, England and Ireland to raise funds. In March 1851 she returned to Perth with £450. She gave £157 to the Bishop, who was broke.

In 1853 the nuns could afford a new £800 school building. As the sisters’ workload increased, they applied to Dublin for “strong” lay sisters.

Two of the oldest lay sisters sent from Dublin were Catherine O’Reilly and Catherine Strahan. O’Reilly filled several roles, including that of a carpenter. She was eventually promoted to choir sister and helped establish schools in places such as Geraldton.

Strahan’s trajectory was different. Strahan was a lay sister at 30 and provided essential cooking and laundry services for the convent until her death at 67.

In 1857 Frayne moved to Melbourne to establish a new school replacing Brady as bishop, Joseph Serra, frequently interfering in the direction of the order. Frayne felt that much of his interference was unnecessary. Such interference culminated in Queensland, where the Sisters of Mercy had established the state’s first girls’ secondary school. The local bishop withheld part of their government salary and exposed them to starvation and premature death.

Ursula Frayne was a pioneer in education in Perth and Melbourne.

Undeniably important but curiously anonymous

The nuns ran important educational enterprises. Historian Stephanie Burley considers the Irish teaching orders to be an empire within the British Empire. Their classes bridged the political, religious and cultural norms of the Irish Catholic Church and the British Empire, acting as a pacifying force between the two spheres.

Unfortunately, as historian Colin Barr notes:

“Unfortunately, historians have too often seen these women as an undifferentiated mass, undeniably important but curiously anonymous. Still [they] were not merely passive transmitters of male ideas or initiatives.

As a leader, Frayne has been the subject of biographies. However, Catherine O’Reilly and Catherine Strahan remained cloistered.

Women who worked in domestic roles in religious communities deserve greater attention. Although historians are increasingly interested in the wider role of nuns in Australian society, some aspects of their influence remain opaque.

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Canadian army

British Army veteran ‘lives in fear’ as he fights threat of deportation

Joram Nechironga, 42, who served in Iraq, is embroiled in a long legal battle with the Home Office (Family handout/PA) (PA Media)

A British Army veteran “lives in fear every second” due to the threat of deportation to Zimbabwe.

Joram Nechironga spent over 20 years in the UK and served in Iraq during his five years with 9 Supply Regiment, based at Hullavington Barracks, Wiltshire.

But the Coventry resident is involved in a long legal battle with the home office to prevent his removal and hopes to raise funds to launch a judicial review.

The father-of-two said he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) linked to his frontline experiences, which at one point led him to drink, and he also served time jail as a result.

Joram Nechironga is involved in a long legal battle with the Home Office (PA Media)

Joram Nechironga is involved in a long legal battle with the Home Office (PA Media)

But the House of Commons heard the 42-year-old “change his life” by working as a painter and decorator after his release, along with his Labor MP. Zara Sultana (Coventry South) urging ministers to prevent his deportation.

Mr Nechironga fears for his safety if returned to Zimbabwe and claims he was ‘tortured and beaten’ for serving in the British army and was considered a ‘spy’ when he was last visit in 2006.

The Home Office does not accept this claim due to “inconsistencies” in Mr Nechironga’s account and wants him to leave the country as soon as possible.

His latest requests for protection and for his deportation order to be revoked were rejected by the Interior Ministry.

Mr Nechironga said he apologized for his mistakes and wanted the opportunity to continue his life in the UK and receive the treatment he needed for his mental health.

He told the PA news agency: “I live in fear every second, they put my life on hold.

“I went to jail and did my sentence and then I did my probation and I was done.

“I had no problem living with people in the community. I’m not a person who’s been in jail so many times, this was my first time since I’ve been in this country.

“Getting a judicial review is my only hope at the moment and it’s important to me, only I have to seek help from my partner and my family if they could help me but they are exhausted mentally and financially to help me.”

Mr Nechironga was granted indefinite leave to stay in the UK in August 2007 and says he has no connection to Zimbabwe.

He received a deportation order in January 2019 after being convicted of assaulting a family member and sentenced to 32 months in prison, 17 months of which, 15 months of which was on probation.

Mr Nechironga spent almost a month at the Colnbrook Immigration Removal Center near Heathrow between February and March this year and was nearly deported on March 2.

He said: ‘I feel hopeless every time I hear a knock on my door. I just feel weak because of the way immigration came to get me.

“It was scary for me because I didn’t expect treatment like that with my PTSD and how they wanted to kick me out and put me on a bus when I was apparently not on the flight manifest.

Since his release from Colnbrook, Mr Nechironga has said he cannot work, study or claim benefits.

Lawyers acting on behalf of Mr Nechironga have made representations based on his mental health, PTSD and the “unsafe environment” for him in Zimbabwe.

The Home Office, in response to a request for protection, told Mr Nechironga: “It is argued that you have not established a well-founded fear of persecution, therefore you are not eligible for asylum. .”

In response to its request to revoke the eviction order, the department said there were “no grounds to revoke your eviction order.”

Documents show that the decisions were made by the department on April 14, but this was not communicated to Mr Nechironga until June 13.

Andrew Nyamayaro of Tann Law Solicitors said it appeared to be a “ploy” to defeat a judicial review as it must be submitted to court within three months from the date of the decision.

Mr Nyamayaro, who provided legal representation for Mr Nechironga, said: ‘For reasons better known to themselves, the Home Office took the decision in April but faxed it to us there. a few days.”

He added, “Joram still faces a risk of deportation and hence the importance of judicial review.”

Mr Nyamayaro said he had advised Mr Nechironga to look for a firm that still offered legal aid as they no longer take legal aid cases and would instead have to charge him.

He added: “All financial supporters are welcome if he wants to continue with us as he is struggling financially.”

Costs for a judicial review could be over £3,000 and increase further if there is an oral hearing.

The Home Office said Mr Nechironga has three months to initiate a judicial review from the date he received the letter, rather than from the April date on the letter.

A Home Office spokesperson said: “Our priority will always be to keep our communities safe, which is why we make no apologies for seeking to deport foreign criminals and since January 2019, we expelled more than 10,000.”

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International headquarters

Etsy only paid £128,000 in UK corporation tax in 2020 despite £160m in sales | Technology sector

Online marketplace Etsy paid just £128,000 in UK corporation tax in 2020 despite selling $195.8m (£160m) as it routed business via Ireland.

The Brooklyn-based company would have been liable for corporation tax of almost £7million if it had registered all UK sales with its local entity, Etsy UK, according to research by the group the country. TaxWatch.

Instead, the vast majority of UK sales – the total of which are revealed in Etsy’s US stock market filings – are recorded through an Irish company, where they enjoy a lower rate of tax. . The tactic is similar to that used by a series of US technology companies, including Facebook, Google, Apple and Microsoft. Amazon delivers much of its UK business via Luxembourg. There is nothing illegal about such structures, but they do raise ethical questions about where profits and taxes are paid.

Etsy, which was listed on the US-based Nasdaq stock exchange in 2015, is liable for UK Digital Services Tax, which would have been around £2.4 million for 2020 according to TaxWatch, but that amount is still a long way off. of its calculation for companies. tax due if all UK sales had been registered here and not booked in Ireland.

Since then, Etsy’s sales have jumped 68% in 2021 to $329 million, hitting a level more than six times higher than in 2018. The group has also bought the second-hand fashion site based in UK Depop in June last year, adding millions more UK sales to its books.

George Turner of TaxWatch said: “Despite Etsy’s ethical claims, this is really just another US tech company using the same tax structures as other US tech companies to shift profits out of the UK. United towards the Irish tax haven.”

Turner said Etsy’s current tax bill in the UK could go down further as the digital services tax could be scrapped as part of a global tax deal arranged through the OECD.

Etsy is unlikely to be liable for an OECD-backed global minimum corporate tax on global businesses with sales of more than €750m (£643m) – which are expected to account for 15% of income. Under these plans, businesses that use tax havens will face an additional tax burden in their home country — the United States in Etsy’s case. Under current plans, only companies with more than $20 billion in revenue — compared to Etsy’s $2 billion to $3 billion — would be forced to pay additional taxes in the countries where they make their money.

Etsy declined to comment on details of TaxWatch’s calculation of its UK tax liability, but it is understood the company paid digital services tax in the country in 2020 and 2021.

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An Etsy spokesperson said the company has paid or payable for any known and material tax liability in accordance with applicable cross-border tax laws. Cross-border corporate tax law is extremely complex, and Etsy is committed to paying our fair share.

“Ireland is the location of our international headquarters, where we employ dozens of people who support our international community in many critical business functions, such as software and product engineers, payment operations, project managers techniques and assistance to members.”

Etsy said it endorses the OECD’s attempt to “create a fairer and simpler model” for cross-border taxation and added, “We strongly support a global consensus on how to tax the digital economy even if our tax bill increases”.

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Non profit living

June 19 celebrations honor heroes and fight for freedom

The weekend of June 19 in Greater Springfield opened with a flurry of activity from different groups and entities, all marking a national commemoration of the practical end of slavery in the United States.

As President Joe Biden signed legislation making June 19 a federal holiday a year ago, the country found itself in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic and unable to officially mark the occasion. This year, after months of vaccinations, reminders and remarkable luck, June 19, 2022 is fully celebrated.

June 19 marks the day, June 19, 1865, when Union troops under the command of Major General Gordon Granger entered Galveston, Texas, the last area to be held back two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

As part of yesterday’s Juneteenth celebration, a section of Wilbraham Road in the Mason Square neighborhood of Springfield was renamed in honor of former State Representative Benjamin Swan, D-Springfield.

“My name is Ben Swan, SWAN, one N. We could only afford one,” joked the longtime lawmaker, now 89.

Despite his self-deprecating humour, Swan was the focus of more than 100 dignitaries, spectators, friends, political allies – and some enemies – and several generations of his family. They gathered in the small Mason Square Black Vietnam Veterans Park.

Ben Swan Way is a section of Wilbraham Road parallel to State Street. It runs between Hawley Street at its western end and Eastern Avenue to the east and is not far from where the Swan had its district officer during the 22 years he served in the Legislative Assembly of State.

Considered by many to be Black Independence Day, Swan said he felt the day was very important overall and to him individually. “It’s an important day,” he said. “I appreciate it immensely.”

Swan was praised for his years of service to Springfield, first as a civil rights activist and then for the 22 years he served in the state House of Representatives.

Although not originally from Springfield, Swan, born in Belzoni, Mississippi, came to Springfield when he was 16 with his family. A veteran of the United States Army, Swan later became a postman with the United States Postal Service. In the 1960s he was active in the civil rights movement and joined the Congress of Racial Equality. He was active in civil rights protests in Springfield and nationwide, working to end segregation.

Mayor Domenic J. Sarno pointed out how ironic the situation seemed given that rather than a man who would become revered by his community, Ben Swan started out as an outcast.

“Just think back to the (19) 60s during the civil rights issues that were unfolding. He never sought accolades for it, but Ben became a civil rights icon. Look where we are now, fast forward since Ben Swan was arrested multiple times on the steps of City Hall with Ray Jordan and others to make it happen, the street, the school (named in his honor). This is what America is,” he said. The mayor explained how the new DeBerry-Swan Elementary School will now also honor the former representative.

State Rep. Bud Williams, D-Springfield, said Swan and his fellow activists were disruptive and sometimes destructive as they fought for civil rights. But, that, Williams said, is what they had to do to be noticed and recognised.

“That’s what they had to do, and they did. And, they did it regularly. Before Barack Obama, before Jesse Jackson, there was Ben Swan. These are his shoulders that we sit on,” Williams said. “Yes, he went to Selma, Alabama, to the Pettus Bridge. He did all of this. He was in prison, but he fought for the people, everyone, and we really appreciate the sacrifice you made,” he said.

Swan was also honored by Rev. Torli Krua of Liberia, who traveled from Boston to deliver a proclamation. Krua said Swan had traveled to Liberia many times and bonded with its people, and fought for Liberia’s Refugee Equity Act to allow Liberian refugees a place in the states. -United.

“He went to my village in Liberia, and he was well received by the people. I stand here today on behalf of the people of the republic of Liberia and the people of my village and thank you for coming,” Krua said. “Thank you for welcoming the refugees who did not live in your district as human beings. I will take this news to the people of the village, the people who gave you a cane and say that we want you back.

Later that day, several hundred people gathered at the Raymond A. Jordan Senior Center in Blunt Park to participate in the Brethren Community Foundation’s June 19 celebration. While the nonprofit organization has celebrated Juneteenth for 20 years, this is the first year it has been a federal holiday. It was also the first year without Jordan, who had been a founding member of the organization. He died in February.

The Brethren is a non-profit organization made up of black businesspeople, mentors and influencers working to improve the quality of life in Greater Springfield.

In honor of Jordan’s memory, the 2022 celebration included a tribute to the former state representative, including a video presentation and a poem by local poet DMoss.

Jordan’s daughter, Denise Jordan, presented two college youth awards given in her father’s name. The awards were presented to Tayvion Griffin and Ivory Johnson, two recent Renaissance School graduates.

Later in the day, Springfield’s Jubilee Block Party kicked off around 4 p.m. in Court Square with live music, food from area restaurants and caterers called Taste of Dine Black, and arts, crafts, and entertainment. crafts and clothing from local black-owned businesses.

Jessenia Ortiz showed her acrylic resin art in all shapes and sizes, from fantastical sculptures to down-to-earth products with a special flair.

“Self by Nikai” is a West Springfield makeup and skincare company that offers all handmade products. Nikai Fondon said she does the preparations herself and can design the right product for a client’s skin type. She makes her products available in sample packs designed to be given as party favors.

Bridgette Kilpatrick calls herself a “traveling caterer”. She lives in Maryland but has family in Springfield, so she spends time here. His company, Rasta Pasta, offers culinary specialties.

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History organization

Juneteenth led to “freedom colonies” like Quakertown in Texas

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This story is the first of two parts.

In June 2021, President Biden and Vice President Harris declared June 19 a federal holiday. As many readers know by now, when President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declaring the end of slavery, slaveholders and others in the Confederate state of Texas refused to obey. It wasn’t until June 19, 1865 – Juneteenth – that the announcement reached many people in Texas. For some slaves, emancipation did not come until the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment in December 1865, when slaveholders in Texas were forced to comply with the proclamation.

Generations of black Texans have fought since 1866 for the nation to learn and recognize the delayed emancipation of enslaved black people in the state. The women’s oral histories help increase American awareness of the resilience and ongoing struggles of black Texans after emancipation that have never been recorded in history textbooks.

Ms. Alma Clark (94) and Ms. Betty Kimble (90), two of the co-authors of this article along with women’s and gender studies scholar Danielle Phillips-Cunningham, tell and analyze this story in Denton, Texas. The two led the documentation of Quakertown, a thriving community that once enslaved people who settled in Denton after June 19. The community lasted until the College of Industrial Arts (renamed Texas Woman’s University in 1957) and a local white women’s club were instrumental in getting the city to pass a 1921 bond to build a city park that would demolish and replace Quakertown.

Quakertown – a thriving community established after Juneteenth

Mrs. Alma Clark and her husband Rev. Willie Clark in Denton, Texas in the 1980s. His parents moved to Quakertown in 1905 when he was 5 to enroll him in Frederick Douglass Colored School. At the age of 21, Denton ordered his family and other families out of Quakertown. (Mrs. Alma Clark Collection)

Centering Women’s Memories

We got to know each other through interviews, rallies, and a town hall as part of Quakertown Stories, an initiative led by the faculty of Texas Woman’s University (TWU) and funded by the National Endowment of the Humanities to integrate Quakertown history in TWU Curriculum. Memories of Mrs. Clark and Mrs. Kimble are central to our telling of Quakertown history because in general, research finds, women anchor and archive community histories.

Mrs. Clark preserved the stories her husband, Reverend Willie Clark, told her about life in Quakertown before he died aged 90 in 1991. Mrs. Kimble preserved memories of her grandmother and of his great-uncle, who also lived in Quakertown. Quakerville. Mrs. Clark and Mrs. Kimble have extensive experience in community organizing and leadership and have carefully preserved rare photographs, notes, newspaper clippings and family conversations on key facts in history in their memories and homes. of Quakertown. They generously shared stories, photographs and vegetables carefully grown in their gardens.

The Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery. Here’s what he did.

Something they could call their own

When Ms. Clark describes Quakertown, she proudly says, “It was like a city within a city. Isn’t that something? A proud group of people – knowing that with all their skills, talents and knowledge, they could build it freely and get other people to support each other… It was something they could call their own.

Quakertown began in 1875, when 27 formerly enslaved black families who, after emancipation, had originally settled in Dallas, moved two miles south of downtown Denton in search of better living conditions. Originally called Freedman Town, it was one of what urban planning professor Andrea Roberts calls the “freedom colonies”, which once enslaved people settled after emancipation. In 1878, residents of Freedman Town established the Frederick Douglass Colored School. Black families migrated to Denton from all over Texas and the country to enroll their children in school. They also purchased land near the school and renamed the community Quakertown after the Quakers, a religious group that had advocated for the abolition of slavery.

In the early 1900s, Quakertown consisted of 295 buildings and about 305 people. Residents have established several businesses and organizations, including a doctor’s office, funeral home, grocery store, midwifery service, preschool, pharmacy, tailor and shoe store, candy store, playground, wood, a meat market, a day care center, three barber shops, three churches, three cafes, and a place where people watched movies and performed plays and songs from the Harlem Renaissance era. Members of the community were socially and politically active, founding fraternal lodges, women’s organizations, and a trade league.

Many Quakertown women owned property, which was rare for formerly enslaved black women in the South. Mrs. Clark’s mother-in-law, Maude Woods (Clark) Hembry, owned a home where Mrs. Clark and her husband later raised their three children. Ms Kimble’s grandmother, Kitty Clark, moved with her family from Bolivar, Texas to Quakertown because “all the black people were there”. She bought a spacious home on the immediate outskirts of the community because by the time she arrived, Quakertown proper had no land left on which to build more homes. She and her husband Glasco raised their sons Homer Clark (Ms Kimble’s father) and Andrew Clark while she worked occasionally as a laundress. As historian and Black History Month founder Carter G. Woodson has noted, black laundresses were respected entrepreneurs in the black community who preferred to do laundry in their homes rather than work inside houses of whites after slavery.

Having a doctor in a virtually independent black community was also a source of pride. Edwin Moten, a Texas native and graduate of Shaw University and Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, started his own medical practice in Quakertown. He cared for his patients by combining his formal medical training with African medical knowledge. White doctors often sought out his knowledge of natural treatments. In Ms. Kimble’s words, Angelina Burr was a “stern and pragmatic” owner and midwife, a respected expert in women’s health care and a community businesswoman. She also delivered to poor white women in Denton who could not afford medical services. Quakertown residents have kept their businesses and community together for nearly 40 years.

The white press has a history of endangering black lives, dating back a century

In 1921, Frances M. Bralley, president of the College of Industrial Arts, the Denton Federation of Women’s Clubs, and other city leaders lobbied and voted for a bond that approved city funding for a city park instead of Quakerville. Their reasoning was that white female college students were at risk of being raped by black Quakertown men as they walked from the college campus through Quakertown on their way to downtown Denton. The bond – issued by daily organized harassment and violence – removed physical traces of the vibrant community named Quakertown, but some people who remained in Denton refused to sell their homes to the city. Reverend Clark’s family and other families moved the physical structure of their homes to the southeastern part of Denton with mules and logs and lived in those same homes for several generations. The memoirs and archives of Ms. Clark and Ms. Kimble teach us that Juneteenth is about both possibility and the ongoing struggle for black freedom.

Part 2: White racism brought down a black community. Will there be repairs?

Editor’s note: Although it is generally Post-style to refer to people by their surname only after first use, Ms. Clark and Ms. Kimble explained that they prefer Ms. in front of their last name because employers called them by their first name during the Jim Crow era to communicate that they were subordinate. We honor their request, given the history of racism they have suffered.

Danielle Phillips Cunningham (@Phillips3D) is an associate professor and director of the women’s and gender studies program at Texas Women’s University.

Alma Clark was raised in Lampasas, Texas, by a family that insisted on the importance of education, and was the first black student to enter the city’s high school.

Betty Kimble is from Denton, TX and takes great pride in helping her community while serving in several leadership positions in the city and the church.

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Canadian army

Borden Air Show takes off this weekend

“Everyone on the base is extremely excited for this weekend – that’s all we’re talking about here,” says the air show public affairs officer

If you forgot what time of year it was, the resounding sound of Canadian Snowbirds doing practice runs in the sky was a great reminder.

Canadian Armed Forces Day and Air Show at CFB Borden is back and expected to be the biggest in many years.

On Friday, the Snowbirds did some final practice before Saturday and Sunday’s big event, which is expected to have record crowds.

As the airshow’s public affairs officer, Lt. Aaron Niles said he was excited about this weekend’s event.

“The last time we did this was in 2018 and we had around 18,000 people. Right now we’re already over what was already pre-sale tickets and we’re expecting between 25,000 and 30,000 people over the weekend,” Niles said. BarrieToday during a media event at the local military base, located about 20 minutes west of Barrie.

“You could say it took two years of planning but four years of preparation,” he added.

In addition to the Snowbirds, the CF-18s, Northern Stars, Manfred Radius Sailplane and more will be on hand to entertain the weekend crowds.

“Everyone on base is extremely excited for this weekend. that’s all we’re talking about here,” Niles said. “We know there has been a need and a desire for us to show what the Air Force can do at the air show, but that includes the Army and Navy, who can also do many things. impressive exhibits.”

The air show runs Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., featuring a day-long family adventure with helicopter rides, a new Brewfest craft beer festival, inflatable games, interactive activities and military exhibits historical.

For more information and tickets, visit the site by clicking here.

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International headquarters

Brillion’s Endries International acquires Store Room Fasteners

BRILLION- Endries International has acquired an Alabama-based fastener supplier, the company announced.

Endries, a Brillion fastener distributor, purchased Store fastenersa 38-year-old company based in Montgomery, Alabama.

Tim Wilsford started Store Room Fasteners from a storage shed in Montgomery in 1984. Nearly 40 years later, Store Room Fasteners operates three facilities in Alabama (Montgomery, Opelika and Selma) and also has locations in LaGrange, in Georgia and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

Endries International began in the basement of Bob and Patricia Endries’ Brillion home in 1970. In 2004, their son Steve Endries took over the business, which now operates 11 national and international distribution centers from its headquarters of Wisconsin.

AFTER: This Manitowoc company acquired Pethan’s Air Services of New Holstein. Here’s what you need to know about the sale.

AFTER: Gulfstream will create 200 new jobs with a $55 million expansion at its Appleton-area plant

Store Room Fasteners will continue to operate on its current system as a subsidiary of Endries, according to a press release. Wilsford will remain with the company in a leadership position overseeing Store Room Fasteners’ 60 employees.

“Tim has built an organization that reflects what Endries was and is,” Endries President Steve Endries said in the statement. “The methodology and approach followed by both companies is very consistent. We look forward to working with our new team members to improve our overall offerings to the market.”

It is the second major purchase this year for Endries, which also acquired Old Dominion Fasteners in April.

Contact Brad Star at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter at @byBradStar.

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History organization

Philadelphia Flyers hire John Tortorella as new head coach

The Philadelphia Flyers have hired John Tortorella as the 23rd head coach in franchise history. The organization has reportedly reviewed a long list of candidates during a six-week process since announcing that interim head coach Mike Yeo would not keep the full-time job. ESPN’s Kevin Weekes reported the news for the first time.

Related: Measuring Tortorella as Flyers head coach

Alain Vigneault started the 2021-22 season behind the Philadelphia bench, but it only lasted 22 games before general manager (GM) Chuck Fletcher pulled the plug. The Flyers finished last in the Metropolitan Division after entering the season with high expectations. They have fallen into the worst era in franchise history, missing the playoffs in six of the last 10 seasons.

The imposing presence of John Tortorella

Tortorella is a coach with the type of experience that can command a locker room. He spent parts of 20 seasons as NHL head coach for four different teams. He coached the Tampa Bay Lightning team in 2003-04 that defeated the Flyers in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals en route to the franchise’s first Stanley Cup. He led teams to the Stanley Cup Playoffs 12 times and won two Jack Adams Awards as NHL Coach of the Year.

John Tortorella, Philadelphia Flyers (James Guillory-US PRESSWIRE)

His colorful personality, strong emotions and demanding attitude led to a considerable amount of conflict with players, members of the media and opponents during his time in the NHL. His past is certainly not without blemish, and his tendency to speak with an edge regularly lands him in the headlines for good and bad reasons. His controversial comments about Trevor Zegras and Sonny Milano dominated discussions in the hockey world earlier this season.

However, any notion that paints Tortorella as a bully who will quickly burn out in the modern NHL is simplistic. He is a strict and demanding leader who has sometimes faced underperforming players. However, the majority of players who talk a lot about him consider his blunt honesty a good quality. Even after his tenure with the Blue Jackets ended in 2021, he received praise from veterans Oliver Bjorkstrand, Seth Jones, Boone Jenner and Zach Werenski.

His experience includes a seven-year tenure with the Lightning, a five-year tenure with the New York Rangers and a six-year tenure with the Columbus Blue Jackets. His only real misstep was his only season with the Vancouver Canucks in 2013-14.

Circulars seek to restore franchise glory

Back-to-back disastrous seasons led to long conversations about the need to restore the franchise’s waning identity. The Flyers proudly possessed a reputation as a feared opponent who played an intimidating physical style during their most successful eras in team history. The need to become “harder to face” has been consistently raised by influential members of the organization in response to the recent lack of success.

Cam Atkinson, Philadelphia Flyers
Cam Atkinson, Philadelphia Flyers (Amy Irvin/The Hockey Writers)

Cam Atkinson played in Columbus throughout Tortorella’s tenure. He spoke forcefully in his exit interview in April about the things he learned from his former manager and quickly moved on to statements about the team’s weaknesses last season.

“You practice your way of playing. Especially when I turned pro, I learned that from Tortorella. John Tortorella, he was great in that aspect. There just wasn’t a lot of practice time (in 2021-22), and it was hard to mold and gel as a group when playing so many games because there isn’t there’s only a few things you can watch videos and stuff but you can’t really get on the ice and do it. As we approach next year, we need to find a way to get more guts, a little more jam, and a little more “f you” into our game. Both sides of the puck, in or crease , defending our goalkeeper, and in their crease. I think we were a pretty soft team this year, in my opinion.

-Cam Atkinson

Atkinson never directly identified Tortorella as the solution to the problems. However, the 33-year-old right winger clearly holds his former coach in high regard for correctly instilling discipline and responsibility. His position within the team’s leadership group will be key in 2022-23.

Senior executives Bobby Clarke and Paul Holmgren reportedly preferred Tortorella over other candidates such as Barry Trotz, Bruce Cassidy and Jim Montgomery. Bill Meltzer described that the two former Flyers had a “substantive role in the final decision” for the hire. Other reports suggested that Fletcher was not entirely determined by the location. Although the level of influence of all parties will not become entirely clear in the near future, the organization now has its fiery head coach who seeks to restore the success of a fallen franchise.

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Canadian army

Opinion: Echoes of the Canadian War of 1812 at play in the invasion of Ukraine

The Americans invaded Canada two centuries ago in an attempt to annex the territory, but were defeated by a much smaller force.

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US President James Madison launched the War of 1812 on June 19 in circumstances eerily similar to those in Ukraine today. The annexation of Canada to the United States was his goal.

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The time had come. British forces are occupied with the war with Napoleon, leaving only 1,800 Redcoats to defend Upper Canada’s vast frontier and its 80,000 people. Americans outnumbered Canadians by more than 20 to one.

The Americans invaded on three fronts: the Detroit River in the west, the St. Lawrence River in the east, and the Niagara River in the middle. The first force to invade was led by General William Hull.

“Inhabitants of Canada! he proclaimed, “The army under my command has invaded your country…You will be emancipated from tyranny and oppression.

As his forces advanced along the Thames, they “liberated” homes and farms by looting and burning them. It must have been common practice.

Entire towns were burnt down over the next few months, including the provincial capital, York, in the spring of 1813, and later that year the town of Niagara during a blizzard in December, leaving residents to perish in the cold. .

Fortunately, a resistance hero had arisen. Men between the ages of 16 and 60 were to serve in the militia, and Major General Isaac Brock organized and trained them as infantry, artillery, Calvary, and even a Great Lakes naval unit.

Full-time, professionally trained colonial regiments, including the Glengarry Light Infantry, Canadian Fencibles, Voltigeurs du Bas-Canada and 104e Régiment du Nouveau-Brunswick, as well as contingents of First Nations warriors were under his command. He pressed the American invaders on all three fronts.

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Brock’s strategies and leadership inspired a very solid defense. Despite the odds, and with the help of First Nations warriors led by Shawnee Chief Tecumseh, he drove Hull’s army from the province, then defeated them at Fort Detroit. Alas, he later died of musket fire at Queenston Heights in October 1812.

The British finally chose his successor more than a year later, but only after the Americans had occupied parts of Upper Canada. Lieutenant General Gordon Drummond enjoyed instant success, leading his troops to victories on American soil at Fort Niagara and Buffalo. But his greatest test was yet to come.

On July 3, 1814, a highly trained force of 5,000 Americans rowed across the Niagara River in an attempt to conquer Canada. Their first target was Fort Erie, just across the river from Buffalo and guarding the entrance to Lake Erie.

The 137 Canadian troops garrisoned there quickly surrendered and the Americans began their march north, encountering fierce resistance along the way. On July 25, the bloody battle of Lundy’s Lane took place, where four of the five generals present were killed.

The Americans withdrew to Fort Erie and proceeded to transform the small stone fort into a strategic stronghold housing 3,000 troops. They were waiting for reinforcements.

General Drummond is injured in the neck, but continues to lead. His job now was to contain the Americans at Fort Erie and prevent them from achieving their objective of flying the Stars and Stripes over Upper Canada.

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In his excellent 2017 book, A History of Canada in Ten Maps, Adam Shoalts describes the siege of Fort Erie and the bloody and unsuccessful attempt to storm it on August 15, 1814. The Canadians lost far more men than their adversaries and were at risk of failing in their goal of stopping the invaders.

Things could have turned out much differently had the British not defeated Napoleon, freeing up troops to defend the North American colonies. The Redcoats captured Washington and burned down the White House on August 25.

By November 5, all invading forces had retreated across the border. Seven weeks later, the Americans sued for peace, renouncing all claims to Canada.

Territorial greed, savagery, false claims – sound familiar?

Fred Clipsham is a Regina-based commentator.

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International headquarters

Gebrüder Weiss expands its international bicycle campaign after

LAUTERACH, Austria, June 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — On April 1, logistics company Gebrüder Weiss launched a cycling campaign titled “Cycling Around the World”, open to cyclists worldwide. Cyclists use an app to record and count the kilometers traveled until the end of September. The initial goal was to cover a total distance of 40,075 kilometers throughout the campaign – the same as the length of the equator.

The campaign goal was reached just 45 days after its launch. The Earth circled the Earth for the second time in mid-June, so Gebrüder Weiss set himself a new goal: to circle the Earth for the third time, covering a total of 120,225 kilometers. A reforestation project in Togo, West Africa, benefits from the sporting ambition of cyclists: for every 40 kilometers cycled, Gebrüder Weiss, in cooperation with campaign partner natureOffice, finances the planting of a tree . Two thousand trees will be planted now, and after traveling enough miles to circumnavigate the globe three times, the company forest will grow by 3,000 trees.

“We are delighted with the excellent reception given to the cycling campaign. We certainly thought that the participants would manage to circumnavigate the world together. However, we would never have thought that they would do it so quickly”, says Frank Haas , Head of Corporate Brand Strategy and Communication at Gebrüder Weiss.

“As a logistics company, we strongly support people who set sporting goals and make things happen on their own. The campaign also fits well into our sustainability strategy to promote environmentally friendly mobility. environment. Gebrüder Weiss has also been very close to cycling for many years, as a logistics partner for many cycling events,” says Frank Haas, explaining the idea behind the campaign.

Cyclists inside and outside the company are invited to participate in “Cycling around the World” until the end of September. Participants can choose from six challenges of varying lengths, covering distances between 60 and 6,000 kilometres. Gebrüder Weiss offers prizes for each challenge.

For more information on the campaign, visit: www.gw-world.com/cycling-around-the-world

About Gebrüder Weiss
Gebrüder Weiss Holding AG, based in Lauterach, Austria, is a global provider of comprehensive logistics services. The family-owned company employs nearly 8,000 people worldwide and has 180 company-owned sites. North American locations include headquarters in Chicago and offices in Atlanta, Boston, Dallas, El Paso, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. Growing and evolving with the needs of its customers over its long history, Gebrüder Weiss is also a pioneer in sustainable business practices having implemented a myriad of ecological, economic and social initiatives. Customized solutions with a single point of contact provide customers with an exceptional service experience focused on reliable and cost-effective solutions. www.gw-world.com

Media Contact:

Karolyn Raphael, marketing winger

[email protected]

T 312-494-0422

Gebrüder [email protected]

www.gw-world.com

Related Images

Image 1: The Gebrüder Weiss corporate forestry project in Togo

The Gebrüder Weiss corporate forestry project in Togo, West Africa: a tree is planted for every 40 kilometers cycled as part of the “Cycling Around the World” campaign.

This content was posted through the press release distribution service on Newswire.com.

  • The Gebrüder Weiss corporate forestry project in Togo

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Non profit living

Where to Celebrate the Summer Solstice – NBC Los Angeles

Temperatures are rising and the days are getting longer, which can only mean one thing: summer is upon us.

With summer fast approaching, many wonder how it can sound like the start of the hottest season of the year, but first let’s see what the summer solstice is all about.

What is the summer solstice?

The June solstice, or summer solstice, marks the beginning of astronomical summer in the northern hemisphere.

Earth naturally orbits at an angle, which means half of the year the northern hemisphere is tilted towards the sun while the southern hemisphere is tilted away from the sun, creating summer in the north and winter in the south, according to NASA.

Solstices only occur twice a year. The summer solstice is the longest day of the year, with some states seeing up to sixteen hours of sunshine.

Where can I celebrate?

While we wait for our official introduction to summer, here are some places that will host celebrations on June 21.

Griffith Observatory

Historic Griffith Observatory in the Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles, California.

Getty Images

Historic Griffith Observatory in the Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles, California.

Most know that the observatory is a must-see in Los Angeles for its great view of the city and its worthwhile space museum.

This year they will host a live show at noon and sunset. There will be discussions as well as a live viewing of the solstice.

Santa Barbara Summer Solstice Parade and Festival

Performers marching in the Santa Barbara Solstice Parade

Santa Barbara will host its annual Midsummer Parade and Festival on June 24. The festival takes place over two days with a celebration on the first day and a parade on the second.

The festival is free and will include live music, food vendors and local artists.

LA music party

Musicians playing their instruments along the street.

Make Music Day is a non-profit organization that will hold its annual celebration on June 21. The event, which shares the day with the summer solstice, is a day when musicians around the world celebrate their love of music.

There will be live music in several parks, streets and sidewalks in Los Angeles.

The event is free to the public and will last until 10 p.m.

Midsummer Festival at the Bower Museum


Mitch Diamond

Bower Museum in Santa Ana, California

The Bower Museum will celebrate the solstice with its family festival on June 19.

The festival will include live music, food, arts and crafts.

The festival is free to the public and will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. A recording will also be available for viewing on Facebook and YouTube one week after the event.

Part of the Fowler Museum’s Summer Solstice at UCLA

The Fowler Museum at UCLA

The Fowler will be hosting an in-person celebration which will include a walk through their latest exhibition, ‘High End Australian Aboriginal Screen Printed Textiles’.

There will also be a reception which will include live music, food, wine and a walk with the curator of exhibits.

The exhibition, which runs until July 10, can be seen at the summer solstice.

The event will run from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and will require a reservation.

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History organization

Welcome to the City of Pittsburgh

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Press release

City of Pittsburgh Announces STOP Violence Community Investment Grants

Grants deployment of part of the city’s peace plan to end the violence

PITTSBURG –The City of Pittsburgh today announced that the application process for the 2022 STOP the Violence Grant is open. The grant is part of the City’s overall approach to ending the violence. Through the STOP Violence Community Investment Fund, the City plans to provide financial support in the form of grants to organizations offering programs that complement the Group Violence Intervention Violence Prevention Strategy ( GVI) existing from the City. Specifically, the grant aims to invest in organizations that take proactive action with people who exhibit one or more risk factors for violent behavior, supporting those people to overcome the risk factors, avoid violence and live a healthy life. healthy and productive. Applicants can request any amount ranging from $15,000 to over $90,000. The application deadline is July 5, 2022 at noon.

“It’s time to address violence as a public health crisis that can be treated and prevented,” said Mayor Ed Gainey. “We know that no single organization can effectively eliminate violence on its own, which is why my administration is focused on community partnerships. The STOP the Violence Community Investment Fund will allow us to support community organizations that are embarking on a bold vision to end violence and make Pittsburgh safe for all.

The STOP Violence Community Investment Fund aims to increase the effectiveness of GVI’s support and outreach, which strives to engage authentically with the community and positively impact violence through a partnership of community members, law enforcement officials and social service providers. Strong applicants should represent organizations located in areas of the city that currently experience high levels of violence; working to prevent violence; and require additional resources to continue this work.

“We are thrilled to make this opportunity available to organizations in our city that are already connected to our high-risk populations and doing all they can to prevent violence,” said Jay Gilmer, coordinator of Stop the Violence. “We know that relationships are key to supporting people, directing them to resources, and ultimately giving them greater purpose and hope.”

Here are examples of potentially eligible projects:

  • Academic, artistic, or athletic opportunities for high-risk individuals of all ages.
  • Family strengthening activities and parent/guardian support.
  • Mentoring for young people and/or adults.
  • Development of communities of support for traumatized people, reintegrated citizens and their families.
  • Culturally appropriate mental health counseling for those at high risk.

Ineligible expenses and projects include:

  • Fundraising campaigns for an individual
  • Annual fundraising events
  • Lobbying/advocacy

The City of Pittsburgh has partnered with the POISE Foundation to administer the STOP Violence Community Investment Fund grantmaking process. Potential awardees must complete a short eligibility questionnaire on POISE’s online application portal to find out if their organization is eligible to apply for the grant. If an organization meets the required criteria, the portal will direct applicants to the application.

To apply, an organization must meet the following criteria:

  • A clear understanding of the dynamics of local community violence.
  • Experience implementing community programs that impact high-risk community members.
  • Relationships and trust established between those most affected by or currently involved in violence.
  • A history of providing services to the target population of the proposed project in the organization’s particular geographic area.
  • History as a communicative and responsible community partner in successful collaborations.
  • Operate their project in the City of Pittsburgh and/or serve people who live in the City of Pittsburgh.
  • Preparation to launch the grant-funded project within 60 days of receipt of funds.
  • Recognized as a 501(c)3 or have a letter of intent or other documented support from a recognized 501(c)3 tax sponsor

2022 recipients can expect to receive their award in early September depending on the availability of funds. In addition to the grant award, grantees may also gain access to technical assistance, cohort collaboration, activities, and events.

For more information on the STOP the Violence Community Investment Fund: https://www.poisefoundation.org/stop-the-violence-community-investment-grants

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Canadian army

Ukraine gets .50 TOR caliber bolt-action sniper rifles with 3 km range

Kyiv ($1 = 29.68 Ukrainian hryvnia)s) — The delivery of Polish sniper rifles with a large caliber WKW Tor is already underway for the Armed Forces of Ukraine to counter the Russian troops who invaded the country on February 24 this year. Images of the rifle on social media profiles after the war in Ukraine are shared and distributed.

Photo credit: Zakłady Mechaniczne Tarnów

WKW Tor is a Polish long range rifle [sniper rifle] with a large caliber. The abbreviation WKW means exactly that in Polish – large-caliber sniper rifle [Wielkokalibrowy Karabin Wyborowy]. In this case, WKW Tor uses .50 BMG cartridges [BMG is Browning machine gun] or NATO standard 12.7×99 mm.

The .50 caliber WKW Tor was designed in the early 21st century and began mass production by the Poles in 2005. It is estimated that manufacturer Zakłady Mechaniczne Tarnów has produced 150 of these weapons so far. Except in Poland [and now in Ukraine] .50-cal WKW Tor is in service in Saudi Arabia and Vietnam. The rifle has another recorded involvement in actual hostilities [apart from those in Ukraine] and this is the war in Afghanistan, where it continues to be used.

The .50 caliber WKW Tor weighs just over 16 kg and has an overall length of 1,350 mm, and only the barrel is 880 mm long. The main action of the rifle is performed by a manually operated rotary bolt. Its muzzle velocity is 2,895 ft/s [882 m/s] from 800gr Barnes. Its feed system is a 7-round detachable box magazine, and the rifle’s maximum effective firing range is 3,000 m.

Photo credit: Twitter

.50-cal WKW Tor has a Picatinny mounting mechanism on which different day or night optical sights with different magnifications can be placed, often at 6x or more. However, the Polish manufacturer offers standard optical equipment, which is the Schmidt & Bender X3−12 P / MII telescope finder.

Sources in Ukraine say Ukrainian forces tested the sniper rifle and left good impressions, especially after the bullet fired from the rifle pierced a soldier’s armor and armored vest. However, no further details were given on the type of armor or the degree of protection of the body armor.

.50 BMG in Ukraine

BulgarianMilitary.com recalls that at the end of March this year, the Armed Forces of Ukraine received .50 caliber Browning heavy machine guns and ammunition for them. Interesting fact: the Browning .50 caliber heavy machine gun can be used as a long-range rifle or as a sniper rifle.

Soldiers in the Korean War used scoped M2s in the role of a sniper rifle, but the practice was notably used by U.S. Marine Corps sniper Carlos Hathcock during the Vietnam War. Using an Unertl telescopic sight and a mounting bracket of his own design, Hathcock was able to quickly convert the M2 into a sniper rifle, using displacement and elevation [T&E] mechanism attached to the tripod.

Ukraine received a .50 caliber Browning heavy machine gun
Photo credit: Wikipedia

In semi-automatic fire, Hathcock hit man-sized targets beyond 1,800 yards [2,000 yds] -twice the range of the standard caliber sniper rifle of the time [a .30-06 Winchester Model 70]. Hathcock set the record for the longest confirmed kill at 2,250 meters [2,460 yds]a record that stood until 2002 when it was broken in Afghanistan by Canadian Army sniper Arron Perry

***

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International headquarters

Key Fuel Stack Sports Momentum Partners Internationally Including Sydney University Football – The Durango Herald

MELBOURNE, Australia, June 13, 2022 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Stack Sports, the largest and fastest growing sports technology provider, continues to build momentum internationally, fueled by key partnerships at every level. With global headquarters in Australia, the UK and the US, Stack Sports leads the sports industry by focusing on four key pillars: grassroots engagement, participation growth , recruitment pathways and development of elite players.

GameDay, the global participation growth platform for Stack Sports, continues to help partners grow play across multiple sports. By providing easy-to-use and seamless technology to national governing bodies and their clubs, the GameDay team is focused on Stack Sports’ core mission to increase participation and transform the sports experience.

“Our passion is to provide high performance opportunities for kids of all ages,” said Valentino Stewart, Program Director and Head Coach at IronUp Sports in New Zealand. “Using technology of this nature (GameDay powered by Stack Sports) allows us to spend more time improving the quality of our programs while making the registration and management process as seamless as possible.”

“For us, it’s about facilitating the sports experience for sports organizations and helping to increase participation globally,” said Jeff Young, CEO of Stack Sports. “We focus on the needs of our partners first and use innovative technology to solve barriers to growing the games we all love.”

Reinforcing this mission, Stack TeamApp has seen incredible growth, now with over 7 million users, as it helps organizations, clubs and teams bridge the communication gap in sports.

“We are delighted to partner with Stack Sports to streamline our club communication. Since I have been in football, it has always been difficult to simplify communication between players, parents and the club, ”said Amy Shepherd, head of football development at Sydney University Soccer Football Club. “Stack TeamApp bridges that gap for us and provides a great platform with many other features to help us stay united and continue to help our club grow.”

In addition to growing the game through software, Skyhawks, the grassroots growth arm of Stack Sports, has played a crucial role in bringing the fun back to sports around the world through camps. As the sport continues to be a major growth initiative for many international markets, Stack Sports has been there to support emerging growth through franchise opportunities.

“I think Skyhawks was the best (sports franchise) because they have the biggest selection of sports,” said Bryan Djuhari – Jakarta, Indonesian franchise. “The reason I got into this business was because I have 2 sons. I wanted them to feel the love and joy of the sport and I found the philosophy of Skyhawks to be very in tune with that.

But growth and success didn’t just come at the youth level. In 2022, the Finnish men’s hockey team followed up their first Olympic gold medal with a victory in the men’s world championship. The hockey team powered by Stack STEVA is clearly the best in the world. Join Stack partners like the LA Rams, Atlanta Braves and 7 of the last 8 World Series champions.

“The top performing teams at the Olympics, the ones that compete at the peak of their abilities and win medals, benefit from tools like STEVA. In this hyper-competitive sport, video analysis is essential to prepare a team,” said Jukka Jalonen, head coach of Finland. “The technology and level of support we get from the team at Stack Sports helps us compete at the highest level.”

From grassroots engagement and participation growth to elite player development, Stack Sports powers the journey and experience of thousands of organizations through innovative technology, great service, and a partner-first mission.

“We are delighted to see the return to sport in Australia, New Zealand and the UK,” said Rob Fletcher, managing director of Stack TeamApp. “We look forward to continuing to support our partners’ safe return to business while helping them grow the games we all love.”

You create the moments, we propel the journey. Sports power by Stack Sports.

Find out more: https://stacksports.com/international-solutions

About Stack Sports:

With nearly 50 million users in 35 countries, Stack Sports is a global technology leader in SaaS platform offerings for the sports industry. The company provides world-class software and services to support national governing bodies, youth sports associations, leagues, clubs, parents, coaches and athletes. Some of the largest and most important sports organizations, including the American Soccer Federation, Little League Baseball and Softball, and Pop Warner Little Scholars, rely on Stack Sports technology to run and manage their organizations. Stack Sports is headquartered in Dallas and leads the industry one team at a time by focusing on four key pillars: grassroots engagement, participation growth, recruiting pathways and player development. elite.

To learn more about how Stack Sports is transforming the sports experience, please visit: https://stacksports.com/.

Learn more about the GameDay app: https://mygameday.app/

MULTIMEDIA: IMAGE link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/22-0613-s2p-stacksports-300dpi.jpg

NEWS SOURCE: Stack Sports

This press release has been issued on behalf of the source of the information (Stack Sports) which is solely responsible for its accuracy, by Send2Press® Newswire. Information is believed to be accurate but not guaranteed. Story ID: 82515 APDF-R8.6

&Copy; 2022 Send2Press®, a press release and electronic marketing service of NEOTROPE®, California, USA.

To see the original version, visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/key-partners-fuel-stack-sports-momentum-internationally-incluant-sydney-university-soccer-football-club/

Disclaimer: The content of this press release was not created by The Associated Press (AP).

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Non profit living

Sternberg named Director of Outreach and Communications at Citizens for a Safe & Clean Lake Superior | News, Sports, Jobs


Caitlin Sternberg has been appointed Director of Outreach and Communications at Citizens for a Safe & Clean Lake Superior. (Courtesy picture)

MARQUETTE – Citizens for a Safe & Clean Lake Superior, a Marquette County nonprofit, welcomes a new staff member, Caitlin Sternberg, as Director of Outreach and Communications. Sternberg, a 2021 Magna Cum Laude graduate from NMU with a degree in environmental science, “has the experience, talent, youthful energy and vision to help us raise awareness and unite our community to defeat the planned heavy industrial rocket launch site near the shore of Lake Superior at Granot Loma,” said CSCLS President Dennis Ferraro.

Previously, she worked as a Great Lakes Climate Corp Team Leader with the Superior Watershed Partnership, partnering with various groups like the National Forest Service or the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community on environmental projects, and she also worked as a land steward with the Rocky Mt. Conservancy in Colorado. These are examples of his organizational and leadership skills, according to Ferraro.

After growing up in a Chicago neighborhood where jets from O’Hare Airport exploded overhead, Sternberg says “Living near Lake Superior reframed my worldview and values”and that in addition to the strong connection she feels with the lake and the surrounding habitat, she is “also impressed with the connection Marquette County residents have with each other and with the environment,” she said in an announcement.

Commenting on the rocket launch plan, Sternberg said she considered this type of “the unnecessary industrialization of our lake shore as an environmental and community threat” which must be guarded against “even after the failure of the rocket launch plan.”

In addition to involving people at community events, developing bonds with community members, and involving volunteers to help with the mission of CSCLS, she also hopes to expand the participation of students from universities and schools. local secondary schools, which she considers “very eco-friendly” she says.

Ferraro noted that “you will also see lots of Cait not only here in Marquette but also at events with locals from Powell Township who have been such great stewards of the environment preserving the beautiful natural landscape we all enjoy.”



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History organization

Hendrick Motorsports reaches 100,000 miles in the lead in the Cup Series

SONOMA, Calif. – Hendrick Motorsports made history at Sonoma Raceway on Sunday afternoon.

The organization has now eclipsed the 100,000 mile lead mark in the NASCAR Cup Series and is the first team in Cup history to accomplish this. Hendrick Motorsports led the first 52 laps of the California road course. Kyle Larson led the first 26 laps, while Chase Elliott led the next 26 laps.

Going into Sunday’s race on the 1.99 mile road course in California, Hendrick Motorsports had covered 99,902.90 miles in its Cup Series history and only needed 98 miles and 50 laps to complete 100,000 miles.

Leaving Sonoma, the team led 1,332 laps and 1,548.91 miles in the 2022 season.

RELATED: Elliott and Byron finish in top 10 in Sonoma

Earlier this season, Hendrick Motorsports became the first Cup organization to boast 2,000 top-10 finishes in the series. The team currently has 2,015 top-10 finishes.

Last year at Charlotte, Kyle Larson’s win gave Hendrick Motorsports its 269th Cup win, overtaking Petty Enterprises as the leader on the team’s all-time winning list. In this race, the team owned by Rick Hendrick led 559.5 over a possible 600 miles. Currently, the team has 285 wins in the sport’s top series.

Two of Hendrick Motorsports’ current drivers are in the top six in the most miles driven for the team.

6: Kyle Larson (3,959.528 miles led)

5: Dale Earnhardt Jr. (4,347.677 miles led)

4: Geoff Bodine (5,167.738 miles led)

3: Chase Elliott (5,819.724 miles led)

2: Jimmie Johnson (24,871.212 miles ahead)

1: Jeff Gordon (31,523.282 miles led)

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Canadian army

PART 2: WWII, Kharkiv, Ukraine and NAZI war criminal Kurt Meyer

Prologue: This project was undertaken due to the invasion of Ukraine in 2022. We like to think that military commanders are held accountable for the war crimes of their troops. Few are.

After the war, Kurt Meyer was charged with war crimes. He was tried and found guilty and sentenced to death on December 28, 1945. The sentence was commuted to life in prison. He was sent to Dorchester Penitentiary in New Brunswick to serve his sentence.

The Regina Labor Council was upset that Meyer had been pardoned and expressed concern to the Canadian government.

The arrogant Meyer asked for special privileges. He didn’t want to be housed with “common law offenders”. Meyer was the only war criminal to serve his sentence outside of Germany. In 1950 he was sent back to Germany to complete his life sentence.

Waffen-SS tank commander Kurt Meyer. He served in France, where he murdered Canadian soldiers, as well as in Ukraine and Russia

kurt meyer p 2
Kurt Meyer. Canada Photo Archives

Kurt Meyer was released from German prison in September 1954 after serving only 9 years for his war crimes. He died on December 23, 1961. It is suggested that he was an arrogant SS officer until the end.

After his release, on September 7, 1954, Meyer traveled to his hometown of Niederkruchten in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, where a parade was held in his honor. He was welcomed as a hero.

Meyer was the Standartenführer, the commander of the 25th Panzer Grenadier Regiment of the 12th SS Division in Normandy. As a leader, he was responsible for the actions of his men.

At the end

Kurt Meyer was an SS until the end. Upon his release, he joined and held important positions as a member of the Waffen SS Veterans Association. For the job, he became a beer salesman selling beer to NATO forces stationed in Germany.

Kurt Meyer was born on December 23, 1910 and died on December 23, 1961 at the age of 51.

Out of respect for the thousands killed by the Waffen SS, no insignia images are included.

Newspaper clipping about the murder of Lance Corporal Douglas Sumner Orford on June 7, 1944

The following images are from the Canadian Virtual War Memorial. This site and Veterans Affairs Canada do a great job of remembering the dead.

If you or your family have scanned images of photos and documents, I encourage you to visit the CVWM site and upload them to your family member’s file.

kurt meyer 3
CVWM Press Clipping

kurt meyer 4
CVWM Press Clipping

Douglas Sumner Orford – The Canadian Virtual War Memorial – Veterans Affairs Canada

Lance Corporal Douglas Sumner Orford

Died on active service, June 7, 1944
Number: F/26412, Age: 23
Force: Army, Unit: North Nova Scotia Highlanders, RCIC
Born: February 2, 1921, Leytonstone, Essex, United Kingdom
Enlisted: October 27, 1939, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Son of Arthur James Orford and Gwendoline Dorothy Orford (née Sumner), of South Woodford, Essex, England
Bény-Sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, Calvados, France, Grave Reference: II. A.3.

kurt meyer part 2
Douglas Sumner Orford, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in 1942 – posing with an unidentified child. CVWM

Editorial notes

The Cold War began in 1947. The Soviet Union became the new enemy. This is probably, in part, why more former NZAIs were not prosecuted and why their wartime organizations were tolerated.

Regina aviation historian Will Chabun told me that in Tony Foster’s book A Meeting of Generals there is a story of Kurt Meyer being transported by the RCAF to the Yukon where he was used to explain how the Soviets would attack that part of Canada. and eastern Alaska. The Canadian army relied on its experience on the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union.

NAZI SS Brigadeführer Kurt Meyer, NAZI member #316714 and SS member #17,559, joined the 1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler, the “LSSAH”, Hitler’s personal bodyguard in 1935.

In my opinion, Kurt Meyer was well versed in elite SS doctrine early in the war and certainly when leading a Panzer reconnaissance unit on the Eastern Front. And given his active membership in the Waffen SS Veterans Association after the war, he never “changed his ways”.

There was controversy over whether Meyer should have been convicted. He was the commander; those under his command committed war crimes. He was a convicted war criminal. The Canadian military should never have asked for advice on anything.

The first part can be read here.

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International headquarters

Pitch from Atlanta to Belgian Princess: Diversity in business is our thing

When Jill Vanparys, an independent video game designer from Belgiumwelcomed the princess of his country to Georgia State University this week she reflected on the type of game that could be created to honor Her Royal Highness.

“It could be an adventure game where the princess goes on a mission to save and heal people while avoiding and disarming landmines,” Ms Vanparys told GSU. Institute of Creative Media Industries, or CMII. “Or it could be another game, a game about three heroes trying to save a princess. But it’s a bit cliché, isn’t it? »

The industry, she said, sometimes reflects these outdated tropes because most developers are male, despite the fact that half of gamers are female.

While the Belgian government Flanders region is embarking on an effort to strengthen the video game sector through tax incentives, industry leaders like Ms. Vanparys hope the industry as a whole will tackle the inherent biases against women, a symptom of its overall deficit in diversity.

“The scandal in the international gaming industry, towards women and minorities over misconduct, sexism and harassment has surfaced repeatedly over the past two months and years. And that’s why we as an industry need to do something about it,’ Ms Vanparys said in a welcoming remark after the Princess arrived downtown.

CMII offers degrees in game development and media entrepreneurship, reaching 800 students so far who have access to cutting-edge technology in film, games, virtual reality, and digital audio and video production . (During a tour with the director of the CMII Brennen DeckerPrincess Astrid had an avatar made to mark her historic visit).

If the record delegation’s itinerary were any indication, Belgium is looking to Atlanta, the birthplace of the civil rights movement, for insight and collaboration on that front.

A longtime magnet for corporate headquarters and an ascendant player on the national tech scene, the city resumes its role as a historic leader at a time of racial awareness in the United States.

This is one of the reasons why he caught the attention of the delegation, said the Flemish Minister-President Jan Ham.

“Atlanta is a mecca for gamers and developers, a home for all areas of digital entertainment,” Jambon said after remarks from Brian Blake, the first black president of the state of Georgia, an institution that leads the nation in granting degrees to minorities. “Flanders and Atlanta have the same goal: we want to bring more diversity to video games.”

Earlier today, during a commissioning visit by a Belgian drug developer UCBthe new research center at its six-building, 47-acre campus in SmyrnaPrincess Astrid heard from many female researchers and corporate executives about how they were integrating inclusion into both the development of therapies and the company’s community outreach.

Lakeisha Parnell, an epilepsy patient and advocate, received a Princess Commendation in a new building that leans more towards a ‘tech center’ than a corporate headquarters, with collaborative spaces, a library, multiple kitchens, a water collection tank 8,000 gallon rainwater tank and a recreation room with a pool table and arcade games.

UCB views diversity and inclusion as part of its long-term corporate responsibility and sustainability strategies, not only in its recruitment, but also in the way it approaches its business as well as community outreach. .

“At UCB, we appreciate our differences and build on them,” Patty Fritz, head of corporate affairs in the United States, told Global Atlanta in an interview. “We have to look like our community. We need to understand each other’s struggles, respect our differences and value them. We don’t want everyone to be the same. We want everyone to look their best – their unique and vulnerable selves.

The company has seven molecules in development to treat conditions such as psoriasis, arthritis and other chronic diseases. Amid a massive drive of digitization, data and personalization, ensuring clinical trials integrate diverse communities is critical to its competitive edge, executives and researchers said.

During the pandemic, UCB launched a Global Community Health Fund aimed at addressing mental health issues among diverse young people in the 38 countries where it works. Dirk Woutersthe former Belgian ambassador to the United States and champion of Atlanta and the South, chairs the fund, which granted 4.5 million euros via the King Badouin Foundation to 99 projects in its first two cycles. Atlanta bands like Black girls smile were among the beneficiaries.

After the princess left UCB, she headed for the National Center for Civil and Human Rightswhere the net benefits of diversity were explored over lunch with Solvay CEO Ilhan Kadria female executive whose Alpharetta the installation had been inaugurated the day before. Ms. Kadri also participated in a panel with women entrepreneurs based in Belgium and Atlanta Organic Amazonia, Omina Technologies, Better and Aquagenicity. If the social media discussions following the event are to be believed, many left the event inspired.

On the first day of their visit, Princess Astrid and other delegates met Jay Baileyhead of the Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurswhich sits in the shadow of historically black colleges comprising the Atlanta University Center and quickly became a point of contact for initiatives aimed at increasing black wealth in the city.

“Atlanta is a leader in making diversity and inclusion an engine of growth,” Michel GerebtzoffConsul General of Belgium in Atlanta, said at a press conference before the mission.

The Consul General has repeatedly conveyed this message to Belgian companies, including during an investment seminar organized last year by the Georgia Department of Economic Development. The city is also adept at mixing creative industries and technology, a similarity to Belgium that could help spur a new wave of investment in the city, he told Global Atlanta.

At a dinner reception at the Midtown offices of King & Spalding, Raphael Bostic, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and the president of Atlanta Metropolitan Chamberhighlighted the city’s civil rights history and commitment to inclusive economic growth.

“One thing that’s really special about Atlanta is its commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion,” said Bostic, the first black and openly gay president of a regional federal bank.

Governor of Georgia Brian Kemp also made remarks at the event, where Princess Astrid granted Mohawk Industries Inc. President and CEO Jeffrey Lorberbaum the Order of the Crown. Belgium is the headquarters of the Georgia-based flooring manufacturer’s research and development as well as its international operations in 120 countries.

“We are very pleased to continue to develop our investments in Belgium,” Mr. Lorberbaum said at the event. “Our associates create breakthrough products to improve our business results. Belgium is truly a beautiful country with a rich history and a long and rich culture. It is also an exceptional place to do business with government policies that promote economic growth for all.

Yet in the gaming industry, this has yet to be the case, said A Ballekens of Gameleon, a business run by women accompanying the delegation that helps businesses localize games for global markets through translation and cultural consulting. Only one in 10 customers is a woman.

“It’s still a male-dominated field,” Ms. Ballekens told Global Atlanta. “It’s changing slowly, but not fast enough and not in Belgium.”

Ms. Vanparys, the freelance video game designer, started out as a graphic designer, but was fascinated by the power of games to tell stories and explain complex concepts in a simple and engaging way.

She acts as an advisor to the Howest University of Applied Sciences in Flanders, which has signed an agreement with the state of Georgia to share best practices in the gaming sector, including attracting more women and minorities to the industry.

“We tackle the same problems and find the same ways to solve them. We can learn from each other as an industry,” Ms Vanparys said.

This is why Howest, in collaboration with the Flemish Games Association Where Flegahired a gaming ethics coordinator two years ago and incorporates diversity, equity and inclusion training into its curriculum, putting the subject on par with the technical skills needed in the industry, Engineer Defour, who leads the school’s programs in digital arts and entertainment, the Princess said at the CMII event. Howest also shines a spotlight on its women, positioning them as mentors and role models at events like the economic mission due to go New York and Boston after Atlanta.

As an extension of this visit, Mr. Dicker from the CMII is due to go to Belgium in a few weeks, with a stopover in Larian Studiosone of the biggest game developers in the country.

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History organization

Living History Event at the Camden-Rockport Historical Society

CAMDEN – On Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Camden, Maine troupes, living history interpreters of the period 1779-1814, will camp on the grounds of the 1770s Thorndike Homestead in Camden. This free, family-friendly event is an opportunity for the public to learn about what life was like in Midcoast Maine during the Revolutionary War era and the years that followed.

Archaeological evidence found on the grounds of the Camden-Rockport Historical Society and the nearby Merryspring Nature Center supports the theory that soldiers were garrisoned in the area during the last quarter of the 18th century. Interpreters will explain the military significance of the site and the role Camden played in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

Visitors can also learn about everyday life in the 18th century through demonstrations and participatory activities. There will be open-hearth cooking demonstrations, with samples for the public, and tours of the historic house. On the outskirts, soldiers cook over the campfire using period recipes, as well as flint and steel ignition demonstrations. Re-enactments of the Camden Militia from the Revolutionary War period, as well as the War of 1812, will display the weapons and equipment of a local soldier. Families will be able to try out a variety of colonial games and toys. An 18th century medical expert will discuss common ailments and treatments of the time.

The event is one of a series of encampments that will take place one Saturday a month, through October, on the grounds of the Camden-Rockport Historical Society’s 1770s Thorndike Homestead (formerly Conway Homestead). The entrance to the farm is located on Route 1, next to Hannaford on the Camden-Rockport town line.

For more information, please contact the Camden-Rockport Historical Society at [email protected], and be sure to follow the Camden-Rockport Historical Society and the Troops at Camden on Facebook.

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Canadian army

Gingrich Cushman: Prayer, strength and gratitude | unionized

We lived in Belgium in the late 1960s while my father was doing research for his thesis. I was too young to remember, but my mother told me that on a trip to France we were greeted with a standing ovation in a restaurant because we were Americans and American troops had liberated their city from Nazi control a few decades earlier.






Jackie Gingrich Cushman writes a weekly human interest column for Creators Syndicate that focuses on current affairs and political issues.


This standing ovation happened about half a century ago. This week marks the 78th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, France. The year before the invasion, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had repeatedly asked British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to open a second front on the Atlantic coast of Europe to relieve his army at ballast.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander Europe, planned and executed the liberation of Western Europe and the invasion of Germany, dubbed Operation Overlord. This large-scale invasion required the mustering and training of hundreds of thousands of troops for the amphibious landing.

People also read…

Before the invasion began, Eisenhower sent a message of encouragement and support to the troops. He compared the invasion to a “crusade” and noted that their goal was nothing less than “security for ourselves in a free world”. He expressed “confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle”, while noting: “We will accept nothing less than full victory”.

He ended with a request for assistance from “Almighty God for this great and noble enterprise”.

The invasion began on June 6, 1944. It included nearly 3 million soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines, some 11,000 aircraft, and nearly 7,000 ships carrying nearly 200,000 tanks and other vehicles.

That night, Roosevelt broadcast his prayer. Biographer Jon Meacham noted, “The White House had distributed the text in advance so that the public—about 100 million Americans—could recite the words with Roosevelt.”

“My fellow Americans: Last night when I spoke to you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that the troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the English Channel in another larger operation. has been successfully completed so far, and so at this poignant hour, I ask you to join me in prayer.

Imagine 100 million Americans reciting this prayer with their president:

“Almighty God: Our sons, the pride of our Nation, embarked today on a great enterprise, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion and our civilization, and to liberate a suffering humanity.

“Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, firmness to their heart, constancy in their faith…

“They will be sorely tried, night and day, without rest – until victory is won. The darkness will be rent with sound and flames. The souls of men will be shaken by the violences of war.

“For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They do not fight for the thirst for conquest. They fight to end the conquest. They fight to free themselves. They are fighting for justice, tolerance and goodwill among all your people. They yearn only for the end of the battle, for their return to the haven of home.

“Some will never come back. Embrace them, Father, and receive them, your heroic servants, into your kingdom…

“Many people have insisted that I call the Nation to a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask our people to dedicate themselves in a continuity of prayer. So may we rise to each new day, and again when each day has passed, may words of prayer be on our lips, invoking your aid in our endeavours…

“With your blessing, we will defeat the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us defeat the apostles of greed and racial arrogance. Lead us to the salvation of our country, and with our sister Nations into a worldwide unity which will spell a sure peace, a peace invulnerable to the intrigues of unworthy men…

“Thy will be done, Almighty God. Amen.”

There were over 10,000 casualties among American, British and Canadian troops, but the invasion succeeded in changing the direction of the war. Less than a year later, on May 7, 1945, the Germans surrendered unconditionally to the Allies.

Compare those actions with where we are today. Small prayer, too few citizens healthy and strong enough to defend our freedom, and words of derision for our country rather than gratitude for our position in the world. We have fallen so far.

Take the time today to say a prayer of thanks and gratitude for those who fought for our country and to liberate other countries and won, and pray that our nation will return to prayer, strength and to gratitude.

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International headquarters

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi summoned by law enforcement directorate on June 23

Latest live news: Hello and welcome to the ABP News LIVE blog. Follow this space to get the latest developments and breaking news from India including PM Modi inaugurating IN-SPACe headquarters in Bopal, water supply will remain affected in many parts of Delhi, latest update updates of Covid, Monkeypox and other developing stories across the country and globe.

PM Modi to inaugurate IN-SPACe headquarters in Gujarat

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will inaugurate IN-SPACe headquarters in Bopal, Ahmedabad on June 10. According to the information, IN-SPACe will be the nodal agency, which will allow space activities and non-governmental private entities to use the Department of Space-related Facilities. Its objective will be to ensure maximum private participation in the space sector.

The objective of this center is to promote private companies working in space technologies. A private company must be involved in space-related work. Simply put, IN-SPACe a separate center or separate institution has been established which will act as a bridge between private enterprise and ISRO.

Water supply will be affected in parts of Delhi

The Delhi Jal Board said water supply will remain affected in many parts of Delhi due to less water discharge into the Yamuna from Haryana. The council said the water level in Wazirabad pond is 668.7ft compared to normal 674.5ft. Haryana’s water supply through the Carrier Lined Canal (CLC) and Delhi Sub-Branch (DSB) also fluctuates.

DJB said water will be available at low pressure in areas of Delhi Cantonment, North East Delhi, West Delhi, North Delhi, Central Delhi, South Delhi and New Delhi City Council.

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Non profit living

Teaching kids life lessons on the golf course

Sport teaches people so much more than the game itself – and our latest Everyday Hero is a perfect example.


What do you want to know

  • Matt Mussett is this week’s everyday hero
  • Besides being a mentor, teacher and coach for young people, Matt is also an e-bay manager for an amazing idea that has helped this non-profit community pay their bills.
  • More Everyday Hero Titles
  • Want to name an everyday hero? Click here

While the game he teaches is golf, Matt Mussett’s lessons are really about perfecting your swing in the game of life.

Some future pro-tour prospects were working on their game the day we visited the First Tee in St. Petersburg. The children of Mt. Zion Christian Academy made their regular visit.

Mussett says young students learn more than golf here.

“Youth mentorship and the development of healthy habits and lifestyle skills for children who may not be getting enough of this education at school or at home,” he said. “Or need to complement what they’re doing.”

Currently working with four schools, Matt says what they learn about golf goes beyond golf.

“In golf, you’re always going to fail before you succeed, and persistence is one of our main things we talk about and teach,” Mussett said. “If you take 10 breaths but hit 11 and it goes up in the air, you feel pretty good.”

Besides being a mentor, teacher and coach for young people, Matt is also an e-bay manager for an amazing idea that has helped this non-profit community pay their bills.

Their Donate a Club Help a Kid program is a huge success.

“Over the past four years, we’ve grown from a few hundred online ads to over 16,000 right now,” Mussett said.

Donated golf items are cleaned and restored and find new homes.

Use the video above to learn more about this week’s everyday hero.

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History organization

Secret City: Behind the Untold Gay History of DC Politics | Books

LGBTQ+ people have always existed, although they have been largely erased from historical accounts and even forced to participate in their own erasure. This is true of American politics, where the 20th century saw many gays and lesbians participate in the highest levels of power, but almost totally erased from the narrative of our nation’s history. In the new book Secret City, historian James Kirchick attempts to place in the historical record gay men and women who served and contributed to their country in Washington DC throughout the 20th century.

“I want to intertwine these two threads – the common thread of history that we all read about and this gay history that has been ostracized and sequestered,” he said. “I wanted to bring them together to show that they are connected stories, that they interact and complement each other. It doesn’t subvert that established narrative, it adds to it and complicates it.

Kirchick was first intrigued by the idea of ​​a gay history of American power politics in 2007, when he moved to DC and realized he was steeped in cultural life and a living gay story. In fact, census data shows that DC has the highest proportion of gay people in the United States. As he began work on the massive project, Kirchick began to believe that as a gay man he was uniquely equipped to write Secret City. “It needed a gay person to do that,” he said. “Even straight liberal historians would feel uncomfortable writing this kind of book. It’s important that we have these stories. My being gay informs my ability to say this.

Beginning with the administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and continuing through the presidency of Bill Clinton, Kirchick has spent a decade uncovering long-hidden stories that have been lost to history. At 800 pages, with well over 100 just for notes and sources, Secret City’s scope seems momentous. Although Kirchick found the writing of the book to be overwhelming as he worked to piece together all the information he uncovered, and as he occasionally became angry at the historical wrongs he found, his dominant emotion while working on the project was gratitude. “I feel enormous gratitude for the people who came before. For the people who have been through this pain so that I don’t have to.

Congressman Bob Livingston (right) and John Rhodes discuss the legislation Photography: Capital City Press/Georges Media Group and Baton Rouge, LA.

Kirchick shrewdly points out that fear of homosexuality has been a driving force in presidential politics, operating similarly to other historically recognized forms of prejudice like anti-Semitism and purges of so-called communists. This prejudice was launched with the revelations of the Kinsey Reports in 1948 and 1953, when people suddenly realized that the gay population was far larger than anyone had guessed. Even scarier, they could be anyone. This fear of the “gay next door” fueled stereotypes that gay people are disloyal to the United States, as well as the belief that they were inherently conspiratorial – “if you have three gay people in the room, it’s automatically a conspiracy,” Kirchick said.

A good example of this point is the bizarre story of Bob Livingston. Best known for being forced to resign amid a sex scandal when he was set to succeed Newt Gingrich as Speaker of the House when Bill Clinton was impeached, Livingston in 1980 became convinced that gay men working legitimately for Ronald Reagan were actually a sinister cabal secretly controlling him. Kirchick weaves this grim story, which fueled an effort to scuttle Reagan’s presidential nomination in 1980, with a number of gay conspiracy theories attached to the Reagan administration (including one that Reagan himself had sex with another man). Although these allegations are preposterous excesses based on little more than rumor, Kirchick argues that they had the potential to have turned Jimmy Carter’s landslide defeat in the 1980 election into a victory.

Regardless of any plot, Kirchick also reports that the Reagan administration turned out to be “the gayest of any presidential administration to date”, demonstrating two central points of Secret City: the growing acceptance of gay people while throughout the 20th century and their great value in government, even a far-right macho like Reagan. It’s a common irony in stories of LGBTQ+ resilience that the very things that oppressed gays and lesbians – like the need to lead double lives or the isolation that came with not being allowed to marry – were rendered advantageous both for the pursuit of their release and their political career. “During the period documented in this book,” Kirchick said, “the closets were good at producing homosexuals with skills that made them supernaturally equipped to function in Washington—they were good at keeping secrets, had no of family life to distract them, and they were more loyal to those in power.That’s the perverted set of skills the closet could spawn.

Throughout Secret City, Kirchick does a masterful job of conveying the flavor of homophobia in each historical era, while using impeccable research to vividly characterize the dozens of different individuals at play in these stories. This is not just a book about how political power has come to affect the lives of gay men and women; more so, it conveys the texture of an ever-changing world that has constantly controlled homosexuals. It shows how social forces shaped gay lives through constant implicit and explicit threats, the very language gay people had to describe their identity and experience, and harsh control over how they could access sexual practices. that were so central to their identity as human beings. beings.

Rock Hudson with Nancy and Ronald Reagan in 1984
Rock Hudson with Nancy and Ronald Reagan in 1984 Photography: Courtesy of Everett Collection/REX

Because of this rich attention to detail, Secret City also offers a vivid chronicle of the waves of liberation and backlash that characterized the growing acceptance of LGBTQ+ rights in the 20th century. As Kirchick shows, World War II became a national outing of sorts, with homosexuals joining the armed forces in unprecedented numbers. This was followed by a wave of repression in the 1950s, then liberation in the sex-positive 60s, followed by greater repression in the days of Nixon and Reagan, followed by greater freedom during Bill Clinton’s presidency. Across the Secret City sweep, we see homosexuality transform from an absolute career killer into something politicians can be carefully open to.

These waves continue today in Republican efforts to slander LGBTQ+ people as “groomers” and erase the gains trans people have made in access to medical care and social inclusion. Although Kirchick is well aware of the ugly politics of the present, as well as the fragility of the gains LGBTQ+ people have made in society, he ends Secret City on a note of triumph, celebrating the transformative acceptance of gay people as a ” massive achievement”. of liberal society”, and a quintessentially American success story. “I can quote a Gallup poll that self-identified LGBT people doubled,” Kirchick said. “And obviously, there was this explosion of visibility. I can’t predict the future, you can never say never. But in my limited experience, I’m pretty sure there’s never been a better time to be gay in this country.

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Canadian army

Prayer, Strength and Gratitude, by Jackie Cushman

We lived in Belgium in the late 1960s while my father was doing research for his thesis. I was too young to remember, but my mother told me that on a trip to France we were greeted with a standing ovation in a restaurant because we were Americans and American troops had liberated their city from Nazi control a few decades earlier.

This standing ovation happened about half a century ago. This week marks the 78th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, France. The year before the invasion, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had repeatedly asked British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to open a second front on the Atlantic coast of Europe to relieve his army at ballast.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander Europe, planned and executed the liberation of Western Europe and the invasion of Germany, dubbed Operation Overlord. This large-scale invasion required the mustering and training of hundreds of thousands of troops for the amphibious landing.

Before the invasion began, Eisenhower sent a message of encouragement and support to the troops. He compared the invasion to a “crusade” and noted that their goal was nothing less than “security for ourselves in a free world”. He expressed “confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle”, while noting: “We will accept nothing less than full victory”.

He ended with a request for assistance from “Almighty God for this great and noble enterprise”.

The invasion began on June 6, 1944. It included nearly 3 million soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines, some 11,000 aircraft, and nearly 7,000 ships carrying nearly 200,000 tanks and other vehicles.

That night, Roosevelt broadcast his prayer. Biographer Jon Meacham noted, “The White House had distributed the text in advance so that the public—about 100 million Americans—could recite the words with Roosevelt.”

“My fellow Americans: Last night when I spoke to you about the fall of Rome, I knew then that troops from the United States and our allies were crossing the English Channel in another operation most important. It was successfully completed. And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join me in prayer.

Imagine 100 million Americans reciting this prayer with their president:

“Almighty God: Our sons, the pride of our nation, today embarked on a mighty enterprise, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion and our civilization, and to liberate a suffering humanity.

“Lead them upright and faithful; give strength to their arms, firmness to their heart, constancy in their faith…

“They will be tried hard, night and day, without rest – until victory is won. The darkness will be torn with sound and flame. The souls of men will be shaken by the violence of war.

“For these men are newly drawn from the ways of peace. They do not fight for the thirst for conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They yearn only for the end of the battle, when they return to the haven of home.

“Some will never return. Embrace them, Father, and receive them, Your heroic servants, into Your kingdom…

“Many people have urged me to call the Nation to a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask our people to dedicate themselves to the pursuit of prayer As we rise to each new day, and again each day past, may words of prayer be on our lips, invoking your aid in our endeavours…

“With your blessing we shall prevail over the ungodly forces of our enemy. Help us to overcome the apostles of greed and racial arrogance. Lead us to the salvation of our country, and with our sister nations into a worldwide unity which will mean a sure peace a peace invulnerable to the intrigues of unworthy men…

“Thy will be done, Almighty God. Amen.

There were over 10,000 casualties among American, British and Canadian troops, but the invasion succeeded in changing the direction of the war. Less than a year later, on May 7, 1945, the Germans surrendered unconditionally to the Allies.

Compare those actions with where we are today. Small prayer, too few citizens healthy and strong enough to defend our freedom, and words of derision for our country rather than gratitude for our position in the world. We have fallen so far.

Take the time today to say a prayer of thanks and gratitude for those who fought for our country and to liberate other countries and won, and pray that our nation will return to prayer, strength and to gratitude.

To learn more about Jackie Gingrich Cushman and to read articles by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com.

Photo credit: WikiImages at Pixabay

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International headquarters

Global Technical Textiles Business Update 2022: acquisitions, divestitures and mergers; Economic news; investments; joint ventures; and Markets – ResearchAndMarkets.com

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Global Technical Textiles Business Update, 2022” report by Textiles Intelligence Ltd. has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

This report provides an overview of recent corporate developments in the global technical textiles industry, including: acquisitions, divestitures and mergers; economic news; investments; joint ventures; and markets.

The report contains information related to the following innovative companies and other organizations:

  • Ahlstrom-Munksjo

  • Albany International

  • Andritz Group

  • Archrome

  • Autoliv

  • AquaCast Liner

  • Bast Fiber Technologies (BFT)

  • Biosphere Society

  • CEMATEX

  • Coats

  • Essity

  • Faser Veredlung Tonisvorst (FVT)

  • Fitesa

  • Fraunhofer ITWM

  • Freudenberg Performance Materials

  • IMCD

  • INDIA

  • Indorama Ventures (IVL)

  • Innovatec

  • Itema Group

  • Kelheim fibers

  • Lamiflex

  • Lumberton Cellulose

  • NatureWorks

  • Piaggio Group

  • Polychem Handelsges

  • Reifenhauser Reicofil

  • Safran Aircraft Engines

  • Solvay

  • Teijin Group

  • teijin limited

  • trill

  • Trutzschler

  • Vesta

  • Weitmann & Konrad (Weko)

  • Advanced Welspun Materials

  • Zoltek

Main topics covered:

SUMMARY

ACQUISITIONS, DISPOSALS AND MERGERS

  • Bast Fiber Technologies (BFT) has acquired Faser Veredlung Tönisvorst (FVT) and has agreed to acquire Lumberton Cellulose

  • Hygiene and health company Essity has acquired AquaCast Liner, a supplier of fracture management products

  • Machinery builder Itema Group has acquired composite component producer Lamiflex

  • Specialty chemicals distributor IMCD acquires chemicals and additives supplier Polychem Handelsges

ECONOMIC NEWS

  • Biopolymer maker NatureWorks moves to new headquarters and research center

  • Freudenberg Performance Materials launches initiative to highlight its sustainable products

  • Household and hygiene products manufacturer Biosphere Corporation has ordered a high-capacity hydroentangling line from Andritz Group

  • INDA presented a plan on how it will support the nonwovens industry after the COVID-19 pandemic

  • Kelheim Fibers raised prices in response to rising wholesale natural gas prices

  • The Comité Européen des Constructeurs de Machines Textiles (CEMATEX – The European Committee of Textile Machinery Manufacturers) is launching a new initiative to support start-ups

  • Specialized chemical company Archroma has moved its headquarters to Switzerland

  • Sustainability certification has been awarded to two sites owned by Indorama Ventures (IVL)

  • Teijin Limited will carry out a life cycle assessment of its carbon fibers

  • The EU has granted funding to three European partners to further develop an enzymatic process for recycling polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

  • The Fraunhofer-Institut fur Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik (ITWM-Institute for Industrial Mathematics) uses numerical simulations of production processes to optimize the filtration efficiency of meltblown fabrics

  • Trutzschler has unveiled its latest comber

  • Vestas plans to scale up wind turbine blade recycling partnerships

INVESTMENTS

  • Ahlstrom-Munksjö uses new testing capabilities to develop molecular filter media for automotive and industrial filtration markets

  • Coats to invest $10 million in initiative to develop environmentally friendly materials and technologies

  • Innovatec invests in a non-contact fluid application system from Weitmann & Konrad (Weko) for the functionalization of meltblown nonwovens

  • Spunmelt nonwovens producer Fitesa will increase its production of sustainable nonwovens by investing in a new line

  • Teijin Group has expanded its production capacity of heat-resistant prepregs

  • Welspun Advanced Materials has invested in a high-speed hydroentangling line supplied by Andritz Group

  • Zoltek to increase production of large carbon fiber cables

JOINT VENTURES

  • Autoliv and the Piaggio Group have signed an agreement to jointly develop airbags for motorized two-wheeled vehicles such as scooters and motorcycles

  • Safran Aircraft Engines and Albany International have agreed to extend their partnership

  • Solvay and Trillium Renewable Chemicals (Trillium) will work on the development of biobased carbon fiber

MARKETS

  • Revenue generated by the global nonwovens industry will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6% between 2020 and 2030, to reach $68.1 billion.

  • Sales of meltblown nonwoven fabrics doubled due to the COVID-19 pandemic

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/yvmoxl

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Non profit living

High food and gas prices add further challenges to the organization that helps feed tens of thousands of local children

TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) – Rising prices for everything from food to gasoline are hitting us all and that includes a number of nonprofit organizations.

Connecting Kids to Meals is a real lifeline in our community. The organization helps feed thousands of children every day, and as gas and food prices continue to rise, so does the need for help.

Wendi Huntley is the president of the organization. “One in four children in the region suffers from hunger. Nearly 40% of children in Toledo live in poverty,” said Wendi Huntley, president of the organization.

The organization feeds children at more than 150 sites during the summer months.

“Some sites are daily, others are part of a two-week camp. Others are only Mondays and Wednesdays. Some are breakfast, some are breakfast and lunch while some are dinner. We suggest people visit our website for all the details. We’re also adding a feature this week where you can type in your address and find a location near you,” Huntley said.

Wendi said this year there were several additional layers of economic challenges. “We get some money from the federal government, but not enough to cover all our costs. With rising food prices, this gap is widening every day. There is also the increase in fuel prices. We have delivery vehicles to get the food to the kids, so all of those things are taken care of. »

Wendi adds that sourcing has also been a challenge. “We regularly have food substitutions because we can’t get certain things that we thought we could. We currently make 4,000-5,000 meals a day and want those meals to be the same across our footprint. We work as best as we can. »

It takes a lot of hands to make it all possible, from employees to volunteers. Teens and young adults who are part of a Harbor vocational training program are working this summer.

“They pack meals, clean, load and unload, wash dishes. Everything we need to do, they do,” said Jason Moss, youth employment coach at Harbor.

Jason said it’s work that helps develop important life skills.

“It lays the foundation for their future. Have a boss, log in and out, and show up on time. This makes them accountable and responsible for their daily lives.

Wendi said more help is always needed for this life-changing work.

“For us, it’s bittersweet. Bitter because so many children need help, but sweet because we are helping tens of thousands of children with the program and we have so many people helping us along the way.

If you want to learn more about the work of the organization and how you can get involved, click here.

See a spelling or grammatical error in our story? Please include the title when you Click here to report it.

Copyright 2022 WTVG. All rights reserved.

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History organization

Elon University / Today at Elon / Resources and recommendations for celebrating Pride Month

June is Pride Month, and Elon University’s Gender & LGBTQIA Center has resources and tips on how to celebrate.

Each year, June is recognized as Pride Month to honor the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, a series of protests that followed a June 28, 1969 police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, which was a popular gathering place. for members of the LGBTQIA community.

June was officially recognized by the US government as Pride Month in 1999 when President Bill Clinton proclaimed June as Gay and Lesbian Pride Month. The government has since expanded the recognition to make it “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ+) Pride Month”. Learn more about the story here.

To help celebrate Pride Month, the Elon University Gender and LGBTQIA Center offers the following resources and recommendations for learning more, advocating, and getting involved.

Resources at Elon

  • Gender and LGBTQIA Center at Moseley 209 provides support for LGBTQIA students, provides confidential support for survivors of gender-based violence, and features gender and LGBTQIA topics
  • Gender and Sexuality Living Learning Community is a residential community open to any student wishing to explore topics around gender and sexual orientation
  • Spectrum is a queer-straight student alliance providing a safe space for all queer people, in existence for over 20 years
  • Outlaw is a social and educational organization that fosters an environment of support and acceptance for Elon Law’s LGBT students, faculty, staff, and professionals
  • The Spirit and Pride Initiative is a grant-funded initiative supported by the Carpenter Foundation and in collaboration with the GLC and the Truitt Center to support LGBTQIA students of faith
  • ASCENDa QTPOC student initiative, supports LGBTQIA students of color through affirmation, celebration and upliftment
  • CLEAR (Coalition of Learning, Empowerment, & Anti-violence Resources) is a student-led initiative overseen by the GLC that coordinates events and presentations on gender-based violence awareness and prevention.

Community Resources

  • Pride of Alamance is a non-profit organization serving the LGBTQ communities of Alamance County by hosting an annual Pride Festival
  • PFLAG Alamance provides support to families and friends of LGBTQ people through educational materials and advocacy against harassment and bullying
  • Guilford Green Foundation & LGBTQ Center (Greensboro) creates unity through programs and philanthropy that advance equality and inclusion for LGBTQ communities

GLC Ally Tips

  • Connect with one of Elon’s organizations or the Alamance Country community
  • Donate to the Gender and LGBTQIA Center to provide financial support for food-insecure LGBTQIA students, to access gender-affirming clothing, and to make educational experiences financially accessible
  • Learn about the history of LGBTQIA communities, from the Society for Human Rights and the Compton Cafeteria Riot, to the Stonewall Riots and subsequent Pride parades

Contact the Gender and LGBTQIA Center staff to find out other ways to get involved or if you are interested in volunteering with the GLC.

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Canadian army

Chinese fighter jet ‘grazes’ Australian plane near South China Sea, Canberra says

The Chinese J-16 closed in on the Australian P-8 while carrying out a routine surveillance mission in international airspace last month before launching flares and chaff that entered at least l one of the engines of the Australian aircraft, said Australian Defense Minister Richard Marles.

Military aircraft typically release chaff—usually tiny strips of aluminum or zinc—as a deliberate countermeasure to confuse missiles, but may also use it to sabotage pursuing aircraft.

In a statement, the Australian Department of Defense described the encounter as “a dangerous maneuver which posed a threat to the safety of the P-8 aircraft and its crew”.

“The J-16 aircraft flew very close to the side of the P-8 … flying close to the side, it threw flares”, Marles told 9News in Australia in a TV interview.

“The J-16 then accelerated and clipped the nose of the P-8, settling in front of the P-8 at very close range.

“At this point he then released a pile of chaff containing small pieces of aluminum, some of which were ingested into the engine of the P-8 aircraft. Obviously it’s very dangerous,” Marles said.

When ingested, the chaff can damage a jet engine’s blades and, in extreme cases, can even shut it down, said Peter Layton, a former Australian Air Force officer who is now a member of the Griffith Asia Institute.

While the P-8 can only run on one of its two engines, the alleged incident would have forced it back to base, ending its patrol, Layton said.

A Royal Australian Air Force P-8 Poseidon aircraft at an air base in Amberly, Australia, January 17, 2022.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said his government had raised the issue with Beijing.

“It was unclear what happened, and we made appropriate representations to the Chinese government to express our concern,” Albanese said.

The Australian plane was flying “in accordance with international law, exercising the right to freedom of navigation and overflight in international waters and airspace”, he said.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese.
In a statement on Tuesday, Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Tan Kefei accused Australia of “approaching Chinese airspace” near the Paracel Islands, a disputed archipelago claimed by China, the Vietnam and Taiwan in the northwest part of the South China Sea.

“The People’s Liberation Army Southern Theater Command has therefore deployed naval and air forces to identify, verify and issue warnings to dispel the Australian fighter jet,” Tan said, adding that the Chinese military “responded with professional, safe, reasonable and legal measures”.

“We sternly warn Australia to immediately stop such dangerous and provocative acts, and to strictly control its naval and air missions; otherwise, it will have to bear all the serious consequences of its actions,” Tan said.

China lays claim to almost all of the 1.3 million square kilometers of the South China Sea and has built tiny reefs and sandbars away from its shores into artificial man-made islands, heavily fortified with missiles, runways and weapons systems, causing outcry from other governments.

Second time in a week

It is the second time in a week that Chinese planes have been accused of endangering reconnaissance flights of other armies.

On Wednesday, Canada said Chinese warplanes were buzzing over its reconnaissance planes to enforce United Nations sanctions against North Korea.

In some cases, Chinese warplanes got so close that Canadian planes had to change course to avoid a collision, the Canadian Armed Forces said.

“During these interactions, PLAAF aircraft did not meet international aviation safety standards,” said Dan Le Bouthillier, head of media relations for the Canadian Armed Forces.

Tensions between China and Australia have simmered for much of this year.

As China circles the Pacific Islands, the US Coast Guard is already on patrol
In February, Australia alleged that a Chinese warship used a laser to “illuminate” an Australian P-8 in waters off the country’s northern coast. Directing a laser at an aircraft can damage pilots’ eyesight and endanger the aircraft, according to the US Federal Aviation Administration.

The Australian government called the act “dangerous” and “reckless”.

But Beijing said the Australian claims were false and that its warship was acting in accordance with international law. He accused Australia of “maliciously spreading false information about China”.

China and Australia are also at odds over Beijing’s efforts to strike new security deals with a series of Pacific island nations that have been close partners with Australia in the past.

There have been other close encounters between Chinese and foreign fighter jets over the years.

The worst of these occurred in 2001, when a Chinese fighter jet collided with a US Navy reconnaissance plane over the South China Sea.

In this case, the pilot of the Chinese F-8 fighter was killed and the American plane had to make an emergency landing on the Chinese island of Hainan. The 24 American crew members were held on the Chinese island for 11 days before their release.

This story has been updated with additional reports and reaction.

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International headquarters

South Korean robotics firm enters US with Plano headquarters

A South Korean robotics company plans to take the United States by storm from a new base in Plano.

Doosan Robotics, which the Doosan Group established in 2015, is launching its new business unit, Doosan Robotics Americas, from the Collin County Business Center community. The unit will be located at 7950 Legacy Dr., across from Toyota’s North American headquarters, and is expected to open around October.

Alex Lee has been named general manager of North and South America for the robotics company. He previously served as General Manager for North America for STXI Motion, a global engineering company headquartered in Israel.

Doosan Robotics CEO Alex Lee said he likes the “new” and “flashy” feel of his offices in Plano.

The new executive said the company liked Plano’s central location and overall vibe.

“We fell in love with everything Plano,” Lee said. “Everything was new and flashy, and our business is new.”

Doosan Robotics, which has about 150 employees worldwide, expects to have 10 people working in the Plano office by the end of the year, Lee said. Next year, he also hopes to start making products from Plano, which will create “a lot of jobs”, he added.

“We plan to grow and flourish extremely quickly,” Lee said.

The Doosan Group’s seven-year-old robotics arm is expected to be profitable by the end of 2023, Lee said. In 2021, Doosan Robotics had a cumulative sales record of 2,000 units, according to company documents. Parent company Doosan Group generated $15 billion in revenue in 2020, the last year an audited report is available. It was founded in 1896 and has 25 subsidiaries and 114 global entities around the world.

Doosan Robotics, which says it is “creating technology for the next generation of manufacturing,” focuses on collaborative robots that work alongside human workers. Applications for the aids include gluing and bonding, machine maintenance, chicken frying, sanitizing, air blowing, welding, turning, construction drilling, and ice cream serving.

The robotics company was the winner of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show Innovation Awards for its robotic camera system, NINA, which stands for “New Inspiration.” New angle. The robot is intended to help users, such as an advertising agency, shoot any angle of a scene with professional quality.

“It was meant to take advantage of the dexterity of a robot,” Lee said.

Dr. Presso coffee barista robot by Doosan Robotics
Dr. Presso coffee barista robot by Doosan Robotics

For coffee lovers, Doosan Robotics has created Dr. Presso, a barista robot that can brew 15 types of hot and cold coffee. It’s intended for locations that aren’t ideal for human baristas, Lee said. For example, a hotel could use it for 24/7 coffee service for guests, he said. Doosan boasts that its robots can even close caps on coffee cups.

“Starbucks has done a good job of charging $6 for coffee. We want to do a good job of getting people to drink coffee every hour,” he said.

Doosan’s US customer base includes companies in a wide range of industries, including automotive, manufacturing, warehousing and logistics, food and beverage, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, construction and packaging. Select customers listed on its website include Yamaha, Hyundai, Samsung, Bobcat, Shell and Johnson & Johnson.

Lee said he thinks the restaurant industry is poised to be the next big market for robots, which can be used for small tasks like dipping fries in and out of oil when they are fried. In Dallas-Fort Worth, Chile’s parent company, Brinker International, has spent almost two years testing robot servers and recently announced plans to expand to other restaurants in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada and New York.

Jenny Zeilfelder, Plano’s economic development manager, said Doosan told the city it wanted to start with a smaller office, but with potential for expansion. The company did not ask for incentives, she said.

“I think that was drawn to our exceptional workforce and quality of life,” Zeilfelder said.

For businesses considering moving from California to Texas, the question is “why didn’t we do it sooner?” »
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Non profit living

Maine Voices: Depp verdict will silence survivors

Stone face. This is how a class of middle school students took care of me. I introduced myself as the president/founder of a Maine non-profit organization that is breaking the silence about domestic violence in Maine. The concepts of enforced silence and domestic violence seemed foreign to them.

I was there to present the art project Finding Our Voices K-12 Love/not Love, allowing young people to find their voice around what is love and what is not. Eye-, mind- and heart-opening results – painting, collage, poetry, sculpture and comics, by boys and girls aged 4 to 18 from a dozen partner schools – are on display at Midcoast Maine until June.

Alright, I said. Tear up a piece of paper and write down why someone might keep quiet. Folded pieces of paper were picked up. I read aloud the anonymous sentences written in pencil.

“I don’t want to rock the boat.”

“Another person could retaliate”

“Afraid of being laughed at. »

“They might not think it’s important (even if it is)”

“No body will listen.”

These statements from 13 and 14 year olds are darts that explain why there is so much terror in the kitchens, living rooms and bedrooms of our communities, and also why the verdict that has just been handed down in the Johnny Depp/Amber Heard -The trial is so dangerous for victims of domestic abuse.

Heard was ordered to pay Depp $15 million for calling herself a “public figure representing domestic violence” in a 2018 Washington Post op-ed. She didn’t mention him by name. She gave no details of what he allegedly did to her. She only said that she had been the victim of domestic violence.

Anyone can sue anything, and Depp sued her for it. And, for that, a jury found her guilty of defamation.

It doesn’t matter here if Johnny Depp was abusive, if Amber Heard was abusive, or if they were both abusive.

What matters is that someone has been severely punished by our justice system for publicly calling themselves a victim of domestic violence, and that a legal precedent has been set that everyone – victims, lawyers, abusers – now knows.

An emboldened domestic abuser is a more dangerous domestic abuser. And this verdict is sure to further embolden the aggressors and further silence the victims.

Someone does not “stay” in domestic violence. They are held hostage, traumatized every day by the endless quest to “keep the peace” with someone who only wants to create chaos and who is totally unpredictable as to what will trigger it.

The key to breaking free from domestic violence and freeing your children is to tell someone something. Saying something alerts others that something is wrong and also alerts you, because to express it is to make it real. Saying something can produce help you don’t know is there and break the intergenerational cycle. It can save your sanity, restore your life and save your life.

But when you’re trapped in domestic violence, everything conspires to silence you and that’s why it almost never gets reported.

Here are a few other reasons during my visits to the school that were cited by middle schoolers in Maine for keeping quiet:

“You don’t want to get the abuser in trouble because you love him.”

“Their partner/family member can be scary.”

“It’s embarrassing for people to see me like this.”

“Afraid you’ll be hurt again”

“The victim might think there is no help.”

And this one: “Afraid of what the outcome might be and who it would benefit.”

— Special for the Press Herald


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History organization

Quin Snyder steps down as Utah Jazz coach after 8 seasons

Snyder leaves his coaching job at Utah as the 2nd winningest coach in franchise history.

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Jazz announced today that Quin Snyder is completing his tenure as head coach of the franchise.

Snyder leaves Utah after eight years with the Jazz and a 372-264 (.585) regular season record. He leaves the Jazz as the second winningest coach in franchise history.

“Quin Snyder has embodied what Jazz basketball is all about for the past eight years,” said Utah Jazz owner Ryan Smith. “The tireless work ethic and attention to detail Quin displays every day is a testament to the professionalism he is. I have nothing but admiration for Quin and respect his decision. On behalf of Ashley and I, along with our ownership group and entire organization, thank Quin and Amy from the bottom of our hearts for all of their contributions to the State of Utah and the Jazz and wish them only the best.

Snyder completed his eighth season as Jazz head coach in 2021-22, leading the team to six straight playoff appearances and advancing to the Western Conference Semifinals in three of six showings. Over the past six seasons, Snyder led the Jazz to a 294-178 (.623) record, which was the third-best winning percentage in the NBA and the best in the Western Conference during that span.

In 2020-21, he led the Jazz to the NBA’s best record (52-20, .722) and highest winning percentage in Jazz history en route to being named the team’s head coach. LeBron at the 2021 NBA All-Star Game. In 2017-18, Snyder was the runner-up for NBA Coach of the Year voting. He was named Western Conference Coach of the Month four times during his time with the Jazz.

“I am extremely grateful to have spent the past eight years with such a respected and historic organization and in the beautiful, kind and supportive community of Salt Lake City. I could not have asked for better owners in the Miller family and with Ryan and Ashley,” Quin Snyder said.

“They represent the Utah Jazz in all the right ways and I know the team couldn’t be in better hands with Ryan’s ownership. He is extremely proud and determined to do what is right for Utah Jazz and bring a championship to Utah. It was also an honor to work with the entire group of owners, Mike, Ryan, Dwyane and others. Danny and Justin show strong leadership and I greatly appreciate their efforts and working with them. At the heart, and what motivates me every day, are our players and their passion for the game, their desire to constantly work to improve, and their dedication to the team and the Jazz. I firmly believe that they need a new voice to continue to evolve. That’s it. No philosophical difference, no other reason. After eight years, I feel it’s time to move on.

“I needed to take the time to detach myself after the season and make sure it was the right decision. I greatly respect and appreciate Ryan, Danny and Justin’s discussions about moving forward together, I just know it’s time. I’m forever grateful to all the players, coaches, partners and people I’ve worked with at the Jazz. Your sacrifice, your kinship made it an amazing and special experience. Amy and I are very grateful to have spent time here as it has been a great place to raise our family. Thank you to our ever supportive and passionate fans. We want only the best for you and to see you raise a championship banner.

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Canadian army

Nostalgia: Coronation Street turns 20

Coronation Street creator and screenwriter Tony Warren. June 4, 1980. © Mirrorpix

1980

June 4

Coronation Street designer Tony Warren poses for the press outside the corner shop on the set of Granada to mark the 20e popular soap year.

First broadcast in December 1960, Coronation Street was actually based on Salford’s Archie Street. Warren scoured Manchester for days looking for a suitable model.

The Manchester-produced show reached its 10,000th episode on February 7, 2020. An original character, Ken Barlow played by William Roache, is still on the show 62 years later.

1953

June 3

Women of the Combined Services create the letter ‘E’ for Queen Elizabeth during rehearsals in Wilmslow for the upcoming Royal Tournament in the coronation year.

Girls from all three services (WRNS, WRAC, WRAF) are trained at Wilmslow for display before the Queen at the Royal Tournament. June 1953. © Mirrorpix

The three groups involved were the Women’s Royal Naval Services, the Women’s Royal Army Corps and the Women’s Royal Air Force. The letter “R” was also formed for the event.

The Queen was crowned by the Archbishop of Canterbury Geoffrey Fisher at Westminster Abbey on June 2, 1953. It was the first coronation to be fully televised.

1944

June 6

Prayers are offered in St Ann’s Church, Manchester, as news filter through of the Allied landings in Normandy on D-Day. France’s liberation mission had begun.

One of the short services in progress at St Anne’s Church in Manchester following the announcement of the successful landings in Normandy, northern France.© Mirrorpix

The largest seaborne invasion in history began with a massive air and naval bombardment followed by an air assault shortly after midnight.

More than 24,000 British, American and Canadian troops cleared the way for Allied infantry and armored divisions to land on the French coast at 6:30 a.m.

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International headquarters

War Hotels lists infamous hostels that served as refuges during the war

I have never stayed at the Europa Hotel in Belfast, although I have spent time in its bar on several occasions. Along with McGlade’s Bar behind the offices of the Belfast Telegraph, it was one of the great “listening posts” for journalists during the Troubles.

The last time I was at Europa was in October 2006, and it was to meet the late Reverend Ian Paisley’s daughter, Rhonda. We haven’t talked much about past violence; instead we talked about his paintings.

Earlier this year, the Europa was featured as part of Al Jazeera’s War Hotels series. This book is based on the research undertaken for this documentary series. The Europa has the dubious distinction of being “the most bombed hotel in the world”. In the period from 1971 to 1987 (the last IRA ceasefire) it was bombed 33 times.

Even as I write this, you can be sure that there is now a hotel in Kyiv that serves as an “island of refuge and operational headquarters” for the international press covering the war in Ukraine, a hotel that is sure to be included in any new edition of this book.

At the start of his novel The Quiet American (set in Vietnam in the final days of the French occupation), Graham Greene’s central character, a journalist, goes to the Continental Palace in Saigon to meet other journalists.

The authors tell us that it was “in room 214 of the hotel that Greene wrote his novel while allegedly working informally for the British intelligence agency MI6”.

The Europa Hotel in Belfast, in 1972, which has the distinction of being the most bombed hotel in the world. Photo: James Jackson/Evening Standard/Getty Images

The Continental, along with the Caravelle, was a safe place for journalists working in Saigon. It “became one of the key places to meet fellow journalists, military, politicians and spies, and gather intelligence”.

Walter Cronkite, one of the most reliable and reputable journalists (he was the prime time anchor of CBS News), preferred to stay at the Caravelle. “It would be his sobering assessment of the course of the conflict that cast doubt on the possibility of winning the war in Vietnam.”

In Hanoi, the capital of North Vietnam, it was actress Jane Fonda who gave one of her hotels party status. In July 1972, she traveled to Hanoi to see for herself the impact of American bombings on the city. She stayed at the Hotel Metropole, and it was from there that she made a series of controversial shows on Radio Hanoi. A few months after Fonda’s visit, singer-songwriter Joan Baez also stayed at the Metropole.

In Sarajevo, during the siege of the Bosnian capital from 1992 to 1996, the “Holiday Inn was the only hotel large enough to meet the needs of the small army of foreign correspondents, aid workers and diplomats who came to the city during the siege. . ”.

In Beirut, the Commodore Hotel was used by many correspondents, including the late Robert Fisk. “If a reporter has a good story and can’t send it, he might as well go home,” Fisk once said. “In the Commodore you had three working telexes and they could call you in London.”

Today, although Ukraine is an exception, the “war hotel” no longer plays the role it once did. “A hotel that could provide the means to establish a temporary press center was no longer a necessity. Text, images, and footage could be sent over Wi-Fi or through mobile phone networks, and from almost any location equipped with these. Time and communications technology have changed.

“Although war hotels, as we have conceptualized them in this book, have become less common as the nature of foreign reporting has changed, they have long been a crucial part and vital nodes of the reporting infrastructure. , and are therefore part of the history of journalism”.

  • War Hotels
  • Kenneth Morrison and Abdallah El Binni
  • Merrion Press, €16.95
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Non profit living

Alan Cumming co-star’s missing chimpanzee thought dead, found alive

Last May, Tonka the chimpanzee, an elderly monkey who played in George of the Jungle and Buddy alongside actor Alan Cumming in 1997, died, according to court records.

The chimpanzee had recently suffered a stroke and died of heart failure, owner Tonia Haddix claimed, submitting a statement and court documents to a Missouri judge that detailed how the animal’s body was burned. in a hearth.

But this week, Tonka was found alive, secretly hiding last year in Haddix’s Clever, Missouri home, where he had a 60-inch television, an iPad-like interactive touchscreen device, and celebrated St. Patrick among some of Haddix’s close friends.

Authorities raided her home on Thursday under an emergency court order obtained by PETA, which she has been fighting in a heated lawsuit since 2018. Fake Tonka’s death was a last-ditch effort by Haddix to keep her beloved chimp after a judge ordered Tonka and six other chimps to be delivered to the Center for Great Apes Sanctuary in Wauchula, Florida.

Haddix was surprised by a recording of a phone call PETA said he received where the exotic animal breeder “confessed that [Tonka] was still alive but would be euthanized on June 2.

With officials still on his property Friday, Haddix admits to having rolling stone that she lied about Tonka’s death, saying he was with her the whole time. “Oh absolutely, 100%,” she says. “In my house, yes.”

However, she denies that she intended to euthanize Tonka anytime soon, insisting that due to her poor health, her long-time vet was simply planning to do an exam that day, although the doctor recommended that Tonka should eventually be put down.

And despite being found in contempt of court for lying under oath, Haddix laughs. “Honey, I’ve been held in contempt of court three times,” she said. “I paid $50 a day [in fines]. I went through the mill. I’m sure there will be jail time in there. Do I care? No I do not care. It’s because it’s about this kid. As long as this kid is safe, I don’t care about anything down there.

Tonka’s discovery is the latest tiger king-esque twist in PETA’s lawsuit against Haddix, which says a documentary is being filmed about her and the legal battle, with the camera crew en route to capture the latest development in the story.

Ron Galella Collection via Getty

It’s been a saga, with PETA first suing Tonka’s original owner, Connie Casey, who ran the defunct Missouri Primate Foundation in Festus, Missouri, in 2016. (Casey was the breeder of a male chimpanzee who mutilated a Connecticut woman in 2009, and owned another chimpanzee who was shot in 2001 by a neighbor after the animal escaped.)

At one point, the facility was home to at least a dozen chimpanzees, and PETA claimed there were numerous violations of the Endangered Species Act, including cockroach-infested facilities, “keeping isolated chimpanzees”. [and] confining them to cramped and sterile enclosures.

Wanting to help Casey, Haddix took in seven chimpanzees, including Tonka, but PETA claimed the facility was still not adequate for the animals, and so added Haddix to the suit. After a back-and-forth over various improvements to the facility, as well as a judge limiting the number of chimps Haddix could have in her care, the chimps were finally ordered to be sent to the sanctuary.

But Haddix says she couldn’t bear to part with Tonka, saying she made him a promise that he “would never have to do anything he never wanted to do again”. And after her alleged stroke earlier that year, Haddix claims she decided to fake her death.

The animal rights group had doubted Haddix’s story from the start, citing her conflicting accounts of how her body was disposed of and a whistleblower last August who claimed Haddix had admitted that he was still alive. After several public pleas for information, the nonprofit has teamed up with former Tonka co-star Cumming to offer a $20,000 reward to anyone who can help them locate Tonka. which led to its discovery.

“After months of searching, Tonka has finally been found and help is on the way,” PETA attorney Jared Goodman said in a statement. “He has endured nearly a year in solitary confinement and is likely in need of urgent care, but if all goes well PETA will soon arrange for him to be moved to a lush sanctuary where he will finally have a chance to live. real life.”

The organization said it is also hiring an “independent veterinarian to assess whether Tonka is healthy enough to travel to an accredited sanctuary.”

But Haddix thinks Tonka won’t survive being transported to a sanctuary, and even if he did, she says a lack of human contact at the rescue facilities would kill him.

“Tonka just can’t tolerate this,” she explains. “If anyone knows Tonka, Tonka is not a normal chimp. He is a popular chimp because he was bred for film shoots and he doesn’t care about other chimps. He doesn’t act like any other chimpanzee, he loves people.

Haddix says she doesn’t know who informed PETA that she was harboring Tonka, saying only a select few knew about it. “I’m sorry for the person who did this and not because I’m threatening them in any way but whatever it is will be made public on all social media to be desecrated under this shape and this way,” she says.

According to a 10-page transcript of the recorded phone call PETA received rolling stone reviewed, Haddix was on the phone with someone who appeared to be part of the documentary crew, discussing potential interviews with family members and updates on Tonka’s health, including the apparent confirmation of Tonka’s euthanasia plans.

“I had [the vet] came out the other day on Mr. T and he has congestive heart failure, again, really bad,” Haddix said. “And [the vet] wanted me to put it down the other day, but I couldn’t. So he made an appointment for the 2 [June].”

“Yeah,” the other person replies. “Maybe we could interview your son and be there at the same time. Let me pass it on to everyone, but it would work.

“Because it’s the end of the legacy,” Haddix said.

While Haddix did not respond to further comments on Friday whether she was indeed planning to euthanize Tonka, she describes the chimp as her “best friend,” saying that if PETA takes her away from her, she will die.

“I won’t do that and that’s fine because if they want it on them, each in turn,” she adds. “At this point, I don’t even care, other than that I want Tonka to be okay. That’s all I care about. And they’re going to kill him, and I’ve already warned all the feds marshals If anything happened to this kid, I feel sorry for them because they will be prosecuted from here to there.

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History organization

Xander Bogaerts sets Red Sox record for shortstop games

OAKLAND — It couldn’t have been more perfect if this was a classic baseball movie.

Xander Bogaerts entered home plate in the top of the fourth inning. He saw two players within four seams of A starter James Kaprielian, one down and inside, the other barely outside. The third pitch, however, was just over the heart of the plate — and Bogaerts squared it, throwing it deep into left field for a solo shot.

Fittingly, Bogaerts drove in the first and final innings of Boston’s 7-2 win over Oakland, going 2-for-5 with three RBIs. The circuit itself wasn’t otherworldly – ​​389ft, 102.8mph at the start – but it perfectly highlighted a historic night for Bogaerts.

With his departure on Friday night, Bogaerts has now played 1,094 career games at shortstop, breaking a franchise record that stood for more than a century. He passed Everett Scott, who played for the Red Sox from 1914 to 1921. Bogaerts and Scott are currently tied for the most career starts.

“It means a lot to us,” manager Alex Cora said. “We will wait for the celebration tomorrow because tomorrow is another big day for him.

“To show up every day means a lot to us, it means a lot to his teammates. It means a lot to the city of Boston.”

Ask around the Red Sox clubhouse, and one word comes up repeatedly to describe what Bogaerts means to this club: consistency.

“What defines him is consistency,” said centre-back Kiké Hernández. “He’s as consistent as it gets, and I would say it’s both on and off the court – at home plate, on defense, at the clubhouse, the same guy every day.”

Bogaerts has long been a Boston staple. He signed with the Red Sox as an amateur free agent from Aruba in 2009 and made his Major League debut four years later, playing 18 games in the 2013 regular season. the magical World Series run from Boston this fall that Bogaerts has become indispensable in the roster — and he hasn’t looked back.

It’s not just the number of games that stands out for Bogaerts’ feat – it’s also that he did it at shortstop. Shortstop is a grueling position, and there was initially doubt that Bogaerts plays it every day at the Majors.

“When I arrived there was a lot of talk, maybe I have to change my position,” Bogaerts said. “I have to give huge credit to the coaching staff and obviously the organization for believing in me and giving me this opportunity.”

Four Silver Sluggers, three All-Star selections and two World Series rings later, Bogaerts is more reliable than ever. In 2022, he leads the American League shortstops with 33 points and is second in extra hits with 20, behind only Toronto’s Bo Bichette. His 62 hits lead all MLB shortstops.

And what does Bogaerts think of his numbers so far?

Probably not much, Cora said. A remarkable quality is that Bogaerts always strives to be better. In 51 games this season, Bogaerts has reduced .325/.394/.492, good for the team’s third-best OPS. He won’t sing his own praises, but Cora is more than happy to do it for him.

“He’s just a humble kid who likes to win games. He did his part – hit the home run, hit the double, played solid defense,” Cora said. “There’s only one man in the big leagues who can say his shortstop is Xander Bogaerts, and that’s me. And I’m proud of that.”

The feeling is shared between Bogaerts teammates. Although he’s only 29, Bogaerts is the longest-serving member of the Red Sox, and teammates — old and new, young and old — say they look up to him on and off the court.

“What you see is what you get,” Bogaerts said. “It’s very cool for these guys to see this and talk like this.”

Christian Vázquez, who has played alongside Bogaerts since they were teammates at the Minors in 2011, summed up the impact of club leaders like Bogaerts in a few simple words.

“When they leave,” he said, “we leave.”

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Canadian army

Military parade, flyover of vintage planes planned for the rededication of Holy Roller – London

London’s iconic Holy Roller will be the center of celebrations this weekend as members of the 1st Hussars, celebrating their 150th anniversary, rededicate the historic chariot after a much-needed year-long restoration.

The events, which will include a downtown D-Day parade and rededication ceremony involving international dignitaries and a flyover of World War II aircraft, come days after the historic tank returned to its long-term home. date in Victoria Park.

“I’m going to invite all Londoners to come to Victoria Park this weekend. We’re going to have a whole bunch of events, including Saturday, but also the rededication of Holy Roller on Sunday at 11 a.m.,” said Bob Buchanan, who led the fundraiser to restore the float.

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“Courage, Strength and Sacrifice”: Holy Roller returns to Victoria Park in London, Ontario.

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Over the past year, volunteers and students from Fanshawe College had worked to restore the tank to its former glory, dismantling, refurbishing and repainting the 80-year-old wartime relic, which stood guard in the center park -city since 1956.

Five years ago, members of the regiment and the city, owner of the tank, opened Holy Roller for the first time in more than 60 years and found that it was rusting from the inside, the hull in danger of cracking. collapse in the tank. decade.

The 33 tonne tank was carefully removed from the park last summer for restoration work, which was carried out at the Fanshawe School of Transport Technology and Learning.

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Photos taken inside the Holy Roller during a technical check in 2017. It was the first time the tank had been opened since it was placed in Victoria Park in 1956.


Courtesy of Holy Roller Memorial Preservation Project


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A look inside the restored Holy Roller Sherman tank, which is much more spacious than it would have been in WWII.


Andrew Graham/Global News


On Monday, those involved in the project were finally able to present their work to the public in a ceremony in which the float came to life for the first time in decades. The next day the tank was placed, using a giant crane, on top of a new platform at its usual location at the north end of Victoria Park.

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The restoration work was completed through a fundraising campaign that Buchanan says achieved its goals through community donations and city funds.

“We have ongoing costs, obviously, with maintaining Holy Roller over time. We don’t want to see it deteriorate to the state it was in before undertaking this,” he said.

Read more:

Holy Roller roars once again at the restoration unveiling in London, Ontario.

Events planned for this weekend, all of which will take place in the park, include a celebration on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with military bands and re-enactments, and military displays that organizers say “will honor our military history. , featuring vehicles that have been and are still in use.

On Sunday, the city center will host a full D-Day military parade, starting at 10:25 a.m. at the Delta London Armories hotel and ending 45 minutes later at the park, with a short stop outside the hotel of town. between.

The planned route will take the parade north on Waterloo Street to Dufferin, west to Wellington Road, north to Central Avenue and west to the float, according to organizers .

After the parade, the Holy Roller will then be rededicated in a ceremony from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. The ceremony, according to organizers, will see the presence of several international dignitaries and feature remarks, among others, from the retired general of the Canadian Army Walter Natynczyk.

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MP Peter Fragiskatos, Belgian diplomat Arnaud Gaspart, Lt. Col. Christopher van dan Berg, commander of the 1st Hussars, and CWO Colin Jenkins, regimental sergeant major of the 1st Hussars, are also expected to speak.

Those in attendance, along with residents of central London, will be treated to a celebratory flyby by the Rumbling Radials, a fleet of World War II-era Harvard aircraft, organizers say.

Read more:

June 6, 2021: Holy Roller leaves Victoria Park for the first time in decades for much-needed restoration

The events will pay homage to both the tank’s legacy and those who served – and mark the 150th anniversary of the 1st Hussars, the regiment that landed Holy Roller on Juno Beach, driving it through northwest Europe until the end of the war.

According to the regiment, the last surviving member of the tank’s original D-Day crew died in 2021.

“The Holy Roller represents the courage, strength and sacrifice of our service men and women. It is an honor to have this incredible artifact forever commemorated in our downtown core,” said the retired Lt. Col. Ian Haley this week when the float returned to downtown.

“We are eternally grateful for the partnerships that allow us to host such an important part of our collective history and we look forward to coming together to commemorate that history.”

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Holy Roller moved to Victoria Park in London, Ontario in May 1956.


Archives and Special Collections, Western University (LFP Collection) via HistoryPin (CC-BY)


Built in Flint, Michigan in 1942, the Holy Roller has survived more than a dozen battles as it traversed terrain in France, the Netherlands and Germany.

Several battles nearly ended the Holy Roller’s bearing, but repairs managed to keep it running until the end of the war. The 1st Hussars chose to take the tank home as a trophy of war rather than have it scrapped.

Returning to Canada in early 1946, Holy Roller spent two years outside the old armories in London, then eight more in Queen’s Park near Western Fair. It was then donated to the city and moved to Victoria Park in 1956, where it has stood ever since.

— with files from Andrew Graham and Amy Simon

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International headquarters

GNC Completes New Global Headquarters as Part of Ongoing Business Transformation | New

Company retains hometown investment with 75,000 square feet at 75 Hopper Place in 3 Crossings development

PITTSBURGH , June 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — When CGN was evaluating potential sites for its new global headquarters, it focused on three key criteria: the location needed to align with GNC’s brand vision and business outlook, reflect its culture of innovation and foster conversation and communication between associates and teammates. And 75 Hopper Place, part of the 3 Crossings development in from Pittsburgh Innovative Strip District, delivered.

“Our real estate and development teams have done an amazing job identifying, reviewing and selecting a space that allows our associates to be creative while supporting our strategic business plan,” said Josh Burris, CEO, GNC. “With the new office, we are leaning towards a hybrid work environment while creating opportunities for growth and innovation that ultimately meet the needs of our people – our consumers, our associates, our partners and our community here in Pittsburgh.”

GNC’s space spans three floors and 75,000 square feet. Located in one of the tallest buildings in the Strip District, the space is anchored by a fully functional GNC campus store where associates can shop, a creative and production studio, and a test kitchen for the product innovation. Additionally, there is a GNC-branded shared gym for all 3 Crossings tenants to support health and wellness as well as convenient on-site parking for associates directly across from the office.

“GNC is an iconic brand and for our new headquarters to be located in one of from Pittsburgh the most iconic neighborhoods – the Strip District – seemed like a perfect fit for our business,” continued Eric Ravotti, director of development, GNC. “We considered multiple locations, but ultimately it was about finding a space that reflected our culture while allowing us the flexibility to grow.”

The office also offers indoor-outdoor workspaces, including a private outdoor terrace aptly named “The ‘Burgh” and accompanying balcony. The well-thought-out layout also includes permanent and hotel offices, cafes, meeting rooms for smaller gatherings and conference space for larger engagements. 75 Hopper Place also offers privacy cabins and wellness rooms to ensure associates can live well.

GNC worked with several companies to bring its new global headquarters to life, recognizing partners like AHK Ventures, Donahue Advisors, LGA Partners, Oxford Development Company, Rycon Construction Inc. and Workscape Inc. as critical to the success of the company’s move. .

“We are fortunate to have incredible partners invested in our success,” Ravotti said. “There are so many people who have contributed time, energy and expertise to our new headquarters and we are grateful for their dedication and continued support.”

To learn more about GNC, visit www.gnc.com.

About GNC

GNC is a leading global health and wellness brand that provides high-quality, science-based products and solutions consumers need to live strong, fit and live well.

The brand reaches consumers around the world by delivering its products and services through company-owned outlets, national and international franchises, digital commerce, and strong wholesale and retail partnerships across the globe. GNC’s diverse, multi-channel business model has global reach and a recognized trusted brand. By combining exceptional innovation, product development capabilities and an extensive global distribution network, GNC manages a best-in-class product portfolio. https://www.gnc.com/

Show original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/gnc-completes-new-global-headquarters-amid-continued-business-transformation-301560803.html

CNG SOURCE

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Non profit living

Non-profit organization helps the public know the signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias

June 2—This June, during Alzheimer’s Disease and Brain Awareness Month, the Alzheimer’s Association reveals insights from people with early-stage dementia and what they would like others to know about living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

Here are six things people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia want you to know:

>> My Alzheimer’s diagnosis does not define me. Although a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is life-changing, many people with the disease say their diagnosis does not change who they are. Many people diagnosed say they want to continue doing the activities they love for as long as possible and stay engaged with family and friends.

>> If you want to know how I’m doing, ask me. The sudden change in how others communicate with someone recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia is a frustrating experience for many people living with the disease. Many people say it can be upsetting when family and friends only verify the person through a spouse or adult child. They say avoiding or avoiding direct communication only makes them feel more isolated and alone.

>> Yes, young people can get dementia. While the vast majority of Americans affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are age 65 and older, the disease can affect younger people. People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease at an early stage (before age 65) say it is important for others to avoid the common misconception that Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias only affect than older people and to take cognitive problems seriously at all ages.

>> Please don’t discuss my diagnosis or tell me that I don’t look like I have Alzheimer’s disease. While family members and friends may be well-meaning in trying to dismiss an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, many people living with the disease say such responses can be offensive. If someone says they’ve been diagnosed with dementia, take them at their word.

>> Understand sometimes that my words and my actions are not me, it is my disease. As Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias progress, individuals may experience a wide range of disease-related behaviors, including anxiety, aggression, and confusion. Those diagnosed say it is important for others to recognize symptoms related to the disease, so they are better prepared to support the person and overcome communication and behavioral issues.

>> A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s does not mean that my life is over. Earlier detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias gives those diagnosed more time to plan for their future and prioritize the things most important to them. Many people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and dementia say they want to continue leading active, fulfilling lives for as long as possible.

“The stigma surrounding Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is due in large part to a lack of understanding of the disease,” David Hernandez, executive director of the West Texas Chapter, said in a press release. “These personal insights from people with early-stage dementia highlight common stigmas associated with the disease and provide valuable tips for improving how Texas residents can support and engage these people.”

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia and how you can support individuals and families affected by dementia, visit alz.org/westtexas.

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Canadian army

Canada accuses Chinese jet pilots of ‘risky behavior’ in international airspace | world news

The Canadian military has accused Chinese air force pilots of unprofessional and risky behavior during their recent encounters in international airspace.

The Canadian planes involved were deployed to Japan as part of a multinational effort to enforce United Nations sanctions against North Korea, which has faced international sanctions over its nuclear weapons and missile program ballistics.


The Canadian Armed Forces said Wednesday that the People’s Liberation Army Air Force “failed to meet international aviation safety standards” on several occasions.

“These interactions are unprofessional and/or endanger the safety of (Royal Canadian Air Force) personnel.”

In some cases, the Canadian crew had to quickly alter their flight path to “avoid a potential collision with the intercepting aircraft,” the statement said.

At times, Chinese planes attempted to divert Canadian planes from their flight path and flew so close that the crew were “very clearly visible,” the statement said.

Read also : Fighter jets from China and Russia flew nearby as PM Modi met Quad: Japanese minister

The statement said such interactions in international airspace during UN-sanctioned missions were becoming more frequent, adding that “these occurrences were also handled through diplomatic channels.”


US intelligence said North Korea appears to be preparing for its first nuclear test since 2017.

The United States forced a vote in the UN Security Council on Thursday on tougher sanctions after North Korea carried out a series of rocket launches, including, according to American and South Korean officials, a missile intercontinental ballistics.

The United States said the test was a brazen violation of a unanimous UN resolution in 2017 that warned of new consequences for testing long-range missiles or nuclear weapons.

But China, North Korea’s main ally, and Russia, whose relations with the West have deteriorated sharply following its invasion of Ukraine, have both vetoed the resolution, saying that new sanctions would be counterproductive and increase tensions.


Read also : An American F-18 plane, in India to show its operational capability, spotted above the skies of Goa

In June 2019, two Canadian Navy ships were “buzzed” by Chinese fighter jets as they crossed the East China Sea.

The ships had been tracked by several Chinese ships and planes as they transited the maritime region.

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International headquarters

Admiral Linda Fagan becomes the 27th Commander of the United States Coast Guard

Adm. Karl L. Schultz was relieved of his duties as commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard by Adm. Linda L. Fagan during a military change of command ceremony presided over by President Biden at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters Wednesday.

With the change of command, Adm. Fagan becomes the first woman to lead a branch of the United States military. “It was about time,” President Biden said at the ceremony.

“Today we are witnessing a long-standing tradition at the USCG. A change of command, as a new admiral assumes the leadership of our nation’s longest-serving continuous sea service. It is both a bond with the earliest days of our nation and a new milestone in our history. We’ve used those phrases lightly, but it’s a big deal,” President Biden said. “Throughout his decades of service, she has demonstrated exceptional skill, integrity and commitment to our country. There is no one better qualified to lead the proud men and women of the Coast Guard. And she will also be the first woman to serve as Commander of the Coast Guard, the first woman to lead a branch of the United States Armed Forces. And it was time.”

“With her trailblazing career, Adm. Fagan shows young people entering the service that we really mean it when we say, ‘There are no closed doors for women,'” the president said.

President Biden appointed Admiral Fagan to become the 27th Commander of the U.S. Coast Guard in April 2021. Previously, she became the first four-star female Admiral in Coast Guard history when she was sworn in as as Vice Commander in July 2021. As Commander, she will lead 55,700 active members, reserves and civilians, and approximately 26,000 auxiliary volunteers.

In keeping with tradition, Adm. Fagan wore the epaulets of Adm. Owen Siler, the 15th commanding officer of the service who opened the doors of the Coast Guard Academy to women in 1975. Although he only met Silor once, Adm. Fagan acknowledged “the outsized impact of this decision.

“If it wasn’t for [Adm.] The courage of Owen Siler, I wouldn’t be here today,” Admiral Fagan said. “I’m wearing his shoulder pads that he wore as a commander, just to recognize the long blue line.”

Addressing her comments to the Coast Guard workforce, Fagan said she was “honoured and honoured” to serve as commanding officer.

“I have always been inspired by the Coast Guard professionals who serve in all of our missions around the world,” she said. “Thank you for your dedication, hard work and service. It is my greatest privilege to work on your behalf.

Schultz became the 26th Commandant of the United States Coast Guard on June 1, 2018. Immediately following the change of command, Schultz retired from the Coast Guard after 39 years of service. He also received the Homeland Security Distinguished Service Medal from Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas of the Department of Homeland Security. Secretary Mayorkas congratulated Adm. Schultz for overseeing a 20% increase in the Coast Guard’s budget and its largest shipbuilding effort since World War II.

“The men and women of the Coast Guard deserve all the credit for what we have accomplished,” Schultz said. “I am honored to have led the best Coast Guard in the world as a Commanding Officer over the past four years, which has presented unique challenges. Our collective resolve, penchant for action, unparalleled devotion to duty, courage and dogged determination have strengthened the Service’s brand and standing, both at home and abroad.

Before becoming vice-commander, Adm. Fagan served as Coast Guard Area Commander Pacific beginning June 2018. Fagan’s professional history also includes commanding New York Area, in addition to operational assignments, including sea service aboard from the USCGC Polar Star and more. more than 15 years as a marine inspector. She has also worked with the International Maritime Organization and the International Labor Organization on flag state and port state issues, including the development of the International Code for the Security of Ships and Ports. (ISPS) and the Consolidated Maritime Labor Convention. Fagan is also the Coast Guard’s first-ever Gold Ancient Trident, as the officer with the longest service history in maritime security.

A graduate of the Coast Guard Academy in 1985, Adm. Fagan holds a bachelor’s degree in marine science, as well as a master’s degree in maritime affairs from the University of Washington and a master’s degree in national resource strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

“The Coast Guard is a more ready, relevant and responsive service thanks to Admiral Schultz’s incredible leadership,” Fagan said. “I thank Admiral Schultz and Mrs. Dawn Schultz for their selfless service over the past four years and wish them fair winds and following seas.”

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